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what are model-a steering arms made of?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by budd, Oct 16, 2007.

  1. budd
    Joined: Oct 31, 2006
    Posts: 3,478

    budd
    Member

    i'm replacing my model-a steering balls and i'm not 100% sure if there cast or forged, anyone know? what have you used for a rod?, i feel better about useing a stick welder for this.
     
  2. budd
    Joined: Oct 31, 2006
    Posts: 3,478

    budd
    Member

    i'm sure someone has installed new balls.
     
  3. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,086

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    They are forged from Ford. Not so sure about the repro balls though.
     
  4. nexxussian
    Joined: Mar 14, 2007
    Posts: 3,240

    nexxussian
    Member

    Are the balls that are there welded on? Or are they an integral part of the original component? I still have mine (been thinking about a speedster project, so I really would like to know).
     

  5. pasadenahotrod
    Joined: Feb 13, 2007
    Posts: 11,776

    pasadenahotrod
    Member
    from Texas

    The steering arm and pitman arm balls are integral with the forged steel steering arms and pitman on a Model A.
    There are 2 ways to replace them.
    Cut them off and drill an appropriate size hole for the straight shank replacement ball, then weld in place.
    Cut them off and drill and ream a tapered hole for the original 32-34 bolt in balls (part number B3311) and bolt them in place.
    Both styles of balls should be available at your favorite Model A parts house!
     
  6. nexxussian
    Joined: Mar 14, 2007
    Posts: 3,240

    nexxussian
    Member

    Sweet, thanks.
     
  7. Fe26
    Joined: Dec 25, 2006
    Posts: 543

    Fe26
    Member

    Uh Oh you've got a problem if you want to weld new balls, or.... you've got big balls if you get away with it.
    I'm not sure about the Model A's but early Fords used high tensile forged steel.
    101 on steel here, sorry to be a bore, but here's how it goes. High Tensile steel is many many times stronger than mild steel, and because of it's increased Carbon and other Alloying elements or mineral levels it is able to be strengthend even further by Forging (refining the grain) and Heat Treating (getting the optimum strength from the different elements and minerals combined within the steel).

    Cast Iron or Steel cannot achieve the same strength as a Forging.
    Many are seduced buy the low cost of Cast verses Forged, however you get what you pay for.

    Also, if you wish to weld on such critical (safety) components you must be aware of the pitfalls.
    1. Welding dissimilar metals is best left to someone who knows....:confused:
    2. Can the finished part be successfully Heat Treated?:rolleyes:
    3. Will the welder and heat treater guarantee their work for an automotive application?:eek:
    4. Of course they won't, so you must have plenty of insurance.:(
    5. If you disclose to an Insurer what you have done, they will decline to insure you..... and rightly so.:D

    Please remember it's not just you're life you're gambling with out there.
    As far as I know Hambers are'nt posting from six feet under.
     
  8. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    The way many Model A people fix worn balls is to turn the ball down to a straight pin, spot anneal a ball bearing, drillit, and press on...weld at ends to secure, trying for minimal collateral damage from heat.
    Ford used forgings very liberally, and was generally well ahead of state of the art in metallurgy and heat treating. Most Ford steels were special Ford-controlled alloys and highly heat treated for desirable strength characteristics. Search out earlier post on axle alloys!

    Most integral ball Ford parts are formed in ways that make drilling for a new separate ball difficult, and the available '33-4 repro balls are of unfortunate quality.
     
  9. budd
    Joined: Oct 31, 2006
    Posts: 3,478

    budd
    Member

    thanks for the advice eveyone, i'm going to give it a go, the real strenght is in the shear strength on the replacement ball stud, i'm going to use arctec # 264 for the rod, drill my hole just slightly off center so as to not remove to much material from where the arm meets the ball stud base, i'll then weld on both sides, i have done toyota 4x4 balls in trucks that have been lifted and run as mod-boggers and rock climbing with no problems, and i have been a welder for 30 years and have alot of critical parts on big rigs, so i feel good about doing this, and it is a stock ccpu that wonts see 45 maybe ever. something funny i have been following on here this morning is the thread about welding on front axles which everyone seems fine with and i chose not to.
     
  10. pasadenahotrod
    Joined: Feb 13, 2007
    Posts: 11,776

    pasadenahotrod
    Member
    from Texas

    That's good, because there are thousands of As out there which have balls welded on by little old Grandpas with a torch or a good old Lincoln 225.
    Unless that truck has a 4.11 rearend you should be able to do 55-60mph all day long.
     
  11. 1knuckle
    Joined: Nov 15, 2011
    Posts: 11

    1knuckle
    Member
    from arizona

    I'm not sure why the insurance company would ask or why you would even mention the steering arms but alot of model a and hot rods here in the great US of A have homemade parts made right in our garages. You can't go thru life scared of everything.
     
    Phil55Kratz likes this.
  12. BamaMav
    Joined: Jun 19, 2011
    Posts: 5,039

    BamaMav
    Member
    from Berry, AL


    True!:D
     
  13. They are forged, use 7018 LoHy or 8018 to be on the safe side.

    V 'em out and stack your welds. be sure and pean the hell out of them.
     

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