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Projects What!!? another 27 on 32 chassis!??. Scratch build body.

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by Mindover, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. daddio211
    Joined: Aug 26, 2008
    Posts: 5,998

    daddio211
    Member

    Hey Junkman, do you have a copy of that issue that you can scan for us?
     
  2. Fired the T up at the weekend - still here if you want to borrow the tub.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Cheers Mate! I will come and get it soon.

    David
     
  4. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Nice to know that someone is reading! ( apart from my friends and fellow car club members) A bit of a slow start but I hope to pick the pace up soon. I have had a lot going on lately.

    David
     
  5. I've been away for a few weeks on holidays - any more progress???
     
  6. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Never enough time! I got hold of a model A front crossmember (thanks Marcus) It needed all the usual repairs...


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I chamfered the edges of the cracks and I welded them up with the mig.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    After this was all ground and cleaned up with a sander its as sound as a bell. I may reinforce the top of the center later.

    [​IMG]

    Cleaning up the penetration on the inside was a chore.
    David
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  7. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    As Dennis said in order to get the car to sit 'right' and have some suspension the back of the frame needs to be modified. My car is going to sit a little lower than Dennis's rod. I decided not to 'z' the frame but to reshape the original metal so that I could get more drop ( a larger kick up) at the back of the chassis. I re- shaped the chassis so that instead of the original 6" drop I now have 10" this should allow the car to sit quite low but the chassis looks sort of stock and there is little evidence of it having been modified.

    Below is a photo of one side done and the other still stock. (The grey rail is modified)

    [​IMG]

    David
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  8. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  9. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,257

    oj
    Member

    Love your work David and would you mind detailing how you 'modified' the rail for another 4". It doesn't look as if it were cut and welded so if you have a choice little trick you can share we would appreciate it, thanks oj
     
  10. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  11. Woah, loving that rail ... good to see you didn run straight for the grinder, i really like that. think i'll follow along with this one..

    MS Aaron
     
  12. weldtoride
    Joined: Jun 14, 2008
    Posts: 259

    weldtoride
    Member

    Subscribed!

    Is there some way, you, as the originator of the thread could check at least # of subscribers? I am not the guy who knows, but I am sure there are those who do. Anybody?
     
  13. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Thanks for subscribing guys! I will be doing the same thing to the other chassis rail tomorrow. I really have to pull my finger out with this or I will not get it done in time.

    David
     
  14. Jeem
    Joined: Sep 12, 2002
    Posts: 5,885

    Jeem
    Alliance Vendor

    Reshape? Dang, I'd be impressed if you moved that much around in sheetmetal but heavy frame material? Dangggg! Are you using heat AND jedi mind tricks?!
    VERY nice work!
     
  15. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  16. Geez david, Thats Art.. i want to get my a model tudor which is on 32 rails lower but in Australia, without having extensive engineering done and tests we aren't able to cut between the suspension mounts of our frames, Can i have your permission to have an engineer look at your work here on this thread to see if i'd be able to try monouver my frame up like yours?.... i figure i might get away with it seeing it isn't cut.
    Thanks Aaron MS
     
  17. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Aaron I have sent you a PM.

    David
     
  18. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,257

    oj
    Member

    And what is that 'slapper' sitting on the bench for? You messing with us David? Probably telling John to toss out some crazy tools and scatter them around just to see what we make of that, right? I can see the order desk at Eastwood right now..'you want a frame slapper? yuh sure bud, we got just the thing' You Brits have a sense of humor for sure.
    Keep up teh good work, oj
    btw/ why are you in a hurry, you've mentioned it a couple times and that seems out of character for you.
     
  19. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Your Lucky you can see the bench, its often buried in tools!. I am trying to get this built for my youngest daughters prom at the end of May so I need to aim to get it done for the beginning of May. I will have help with some of the other work but I have to get the chassis and body made. I am so busy at work I am having difficulty finding time. I am working on my house as well and also filming for another DVD. I will knock the house on the head soon so I can get more time on this.

    David
     
  20. weldtoride
    Joined: Jun 14, 2008
    Posts: 259

    weldtoride
    Member


    I don't know how David did this, but heat bending is used to straighten damaged bridge beams. Some posts here on how to straighten bent frame rails with the technique as well.

    If this is what David used, he has indeed taken it to a "Jedi " level as you say.

    Again, I do not know the limits of the technique, nor if this is what David used, but this is how bridge beams are straightened with it, courtesy DOT (http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/bridge/steel/02.cfm)


    2.3.1 Vee Heat

    The vee heat is the most fundamental pattern used to straighten strong axis (category S) bends in steel plate elements. As seen in Figure 6, a typical vee heat starts with a very small spot heat applied at the apex of the vee–shaped area using an oxy–fuel torch. When the desired temperature is reached (usually around 650°C or 1200°F for mild carbon steel), the torch is advanced progressively in a serpentine motion toward the base of the vee. This motion is efficient for progressively heating the vee from top to bottom. The plate will initially move upward (Figure 6a) as a result of longitudinal expansion of material above the neutral axis producing negative bending. The cool material adjacent to the heated area resists the normal thermal expansion of the steel in the longitudinal direction. As a result, the heated material will tend to expand, or upset, to a greater extent through the thickness of the plate, resulting in plastic flow.
    At the completion of the heat, the entire heated area is at a high and relatively uniform temperature. At this point the plate has moved downward (Figure 6b) due to longitudinal expansion of material below the neutral axis producing positive bending. As the steel cools, the material contracts longitudinally to a greater degree than the expansion during heating. Thus, a net contraction occurs. The net upsetting is proportional to the width across the vee, so the amount of upsetting increases from top to bottom of the vee.
    [​IMG]
    Figure 6. Stages of movement during vee heat.
    This variation produces a closure of the vee. Bending is produced in an initially straight member, or straightening occurs (if the plate is bent in the opposite direction to that of the straightening movement, Figure 6c). For many applications, it is most efficient to utilize a vee that extends over the full depth of the plate element but, partial depth vees may be applicable in certain situations. When using partial depth vees, the open end should extend to the edge of the element. The vee depth is varied by placing the apex at a partial depth location. The most typical partial depth vees are the three–quarter and half depth. Applications for partial depth vees will be discussed in later sections.

    If this is what he used, I bet it cost a lot of gas.
     
  21. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    All will be revealed...

    David
     
  22. -Brent-
    Joined: Nov 20, 2006
    Posts: 5,982

    -Brent-
    Member

    What a tease! :D
     
  23. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  24. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Last edited: Oct 21, 2014
  25. Dyce
    Joined: Sep 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,902

    Dyce
    Member

    Frame is looking good David!! Hurry up, I want to see the body come together. LOL
     
  26. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England


    Me too!

    glad ya like it Jeff.

    David
     
  27. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Chassis is in one piece now and got the engine running today! Cheers Glen!

    David
     
  28. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    I got the Flathead running yesterday with help from my good friend Glen and my mechanic Owen. It sounded great. Nothing like a running engine to spure you on!.

    I got the chassis in one piece, its not completely finished but I thought I would have a bit of a brake frome the chassis and do a bit of bodywork today.

    Like I said before I built a buck for the turtle deck twenty years ago but I decided to add a piece in to give me the depth of the wheel well rebate. (rabbit?)

    This is one side of the buck with the new section in place...

    [​IMG]

    David
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2014
  29. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,625

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    After cutting out a blank I began to shape one piece of the turtle deck. this panel will be made from two sections plus the wheelwell. The piece is not quite the finished shape in the photo. Once it is shaped at the top I will put the wheel well shape into it then do the swage (bead).
    ,

    David

    ,
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2014
  30. Yes! Yes! Yes! So, how exactly are you shaping that David? Shrink then planish?
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2011

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