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Technical Welding a crank pulley

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by tubman, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 4,876

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I pulled my '51 Mercury engine out of storage last week in preparation to putting it on my test stand to see if it runs as good as I remember. When I pulled it out, I saw that the crank pulley had a chunk broken out of it. I just missed one on e?ay, so I am wondering ; "Can this be fixed?" Are these cast steel or cast Iron? Could I cut and grind a chunk of metal and weld or braze it in? (I don't have the broken chunk.) Has anyone ever done this? I'm retired, so I have the time, and I kind of like fiddling with stuff like this. Any suggestions or opinions are welcome. I think I may have another one like this in a box somewhere as well. More garage stuff 001.JPG More garage stuff 002.JPG
     
  2. Hot Rods Ta Hell
    Joined: Apr 20, 2008
    Posts: 4,030

    Hot Rods Ta Hell
    Member

    Probably fixable (anything is) but not worth the effort. Keep in mind that once you weld it, the pulley will no longer be balanced which will be bad when the engine is at speed. Easier to replace and put your labor into other places on the engine.
    It's an unusual form of damage. I'd be concerned that the chip was a result of the engine being dropped at one point and possible harm to the crank.
     
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  3. Gene Boul
    Joined: Feb 9, 2006
    Posts: 807

    Gene Boul

    You're kidding, right?
    They are easy to find and relatively inexpensive. Actually you could radius the busted edges and run it if you had to...
     
  4. eBay item number:
    141480240256
    Your pulley is the cast version and would take pre-heating and a special welding rod to repair..
     
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  5. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 4,876

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    $129.99? I'll keep looking, but pre-heating and special rod don't scare me.
     
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  6. 50dodge4x4
    Joined: Aug 7, 2004
    Posts: 3,535

    50dodge4x4
    Member

    After its welded, what are you going to do for the balancing? Last time I checked, the nickel rod was about $10 a stick, they came 3 sticks to a pack, and your probably going to need several sticks if you plan on building that area up with welding rod. There will be a lot of time used up to make that missing section with rod. Then don't forget the grind time to dress it back into shape and its still probably going to be out of balance. I run a welding shop, I'd buy the e bay pulley. Gene
     
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  7. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 4,876

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Can anyone answer my initial question; are these cast iron or cast steel? I have a book that shows how to determine this by hitting the piece with a grinder, but I thought someone might know, because I ain't too good at reading sparks.
     
  8. Raunchy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2007
    Posts: 373

    Raunchy
    Member

  9. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 9,908

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    If you could find another one that is broken then cut the peace out of it and braze it in yours.
     
  10. gary terhaar
    Joined: Jul 23, 2007
    Posts: 655

    gary terhaar
    Member
    from oakdale ny

    I used Ni-99 rod to repair one. Tig welded it withNo issues at all with a light pre heat-post heat. Any machine shop could spin it on their balancer for a few bucks but with the operation range of a flat head and the factory balancing what it is,why bother.
     
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  11. George G
    Joined: Jun 28, 2005
    Posts: 1,273

    George G
    Member

    Pm me, I may have one
     
  12. JonF
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 169

    JonF
    Member

    Put the balancer in a lathe and cut the first sheave off?
     
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  13. Gearhead Graphics
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 3,361

    Gearhead Graphics
    Member
    from Denver Co

    Do you need that rib? spin it in a lathe and cut it off. Id do that before welding it back up.
    Itll take you close to that 130 bucks by the time you count rod and time
     
  14. There's better battles to choose.
     
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  15. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 4,876

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Later car flatheads need it to run both water pumps correctly. My time is free; if rods are 3 for $10, like somebody said above, economics don't really come into play on this.

    Gary, thanks for your post; I'm going to go ahead with this. If I fail, I'll just toss the pulley, and the experience should be worth at least $10.
     
  16. Cast iron or steel you can still cut and weld or braze a piece of mild steel in there. I am going to guess it is cast iron, a simple test take a small drill bit and drill a hole in it, cast iron will come out in charcoal gray dust and your bit will stay cool dry, cast steel is harder and your chips will come out as chips and you'll need to oil it to keep the bit cool.

    if it turns out to be cast iron there is some really neat rod for welding it. let me know and I'll get you the numbers on it. it is way easier than nirod. It is a little pricey and many welding supply houses will sell it by the rod if you can't find it that way I'll try and snipe you a couple of sticks from a friend.

    Note: this is a tubman offer and if you don't know for a fact that we are friends leave me the hell alone.
     
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  17. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 4,876

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thanks Beaner. I'll try not to take you up on your offer, but if I can't find some elsewhere, I may be back. I have spent the last hour watching videos on YouTube on the subject and there is a lot of information out there and more than one way to go about it. The more I learn, the more possible this looks. Thanks for the drill tip.
     
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  18. V8 Bob
    Joined: Feb 6, 2007
    Posts: 2,590

    V8 Bob
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Before you waste any time repairing the pulley, clean it up and check for cracking along the crank snout, as a couple of mine were. These pulleys were on all '50-'53 Ford and Mercury V8 cars, so they are not rare or expensive.
     
  19. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 4,876

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Bob,

    Thanks for the tip; I hadn't considered that. It's getting to the point where "they are not rare or expensive" only if you can find one.

    Tubman
     
  20. Mac VP
    Joined: May 13, 2014
    Posts: 305

    Mac VP
    Member

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  21. 270dodge
    Joined: Feb 11, 2012
    Posts: 733

    270dodge
    Member
    from Ohio

     
  22. 270dodge
    Joined: Feb 11, 2012
    Posts: 733

    270dodge
    Member
    from Ohio

    Way good on you Beaner. I know that I could have clicked that worthless "like" button but this deserves a real like.
     
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  23. flatheadgary
    Joined: Jul 17, 2007
    Posts: 748

    flatheadgary
    Member
    from boron,ca

    i am not picking a fight but, why the hell is it every time someone wants to spend his time and money on something you wouldn't do, you say go buy another one? how in the world did you ever learn how to work on cars?
     
  24. Thanks man. Tubman is good people who wouldn't try and lend him a hand.

    I don't think you are picking a fight at all. Sometimes it is way easier to replace a part then to repair it but you are absolutely correct, sometimes the journey is worth way more then the price of admission and learning a skill that you thought was out of reach is worth a lot.
     
  25. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 4,876

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Even if this doesn't work out (though I think it will), the journey through You-Tube was very rewarding. There are new materials and techniques there that I had no idea existed. Even if I find a reasonably priced pulley, I'm gonna get some of these new rods just to experiment with. Hobart has a new lower-priced cast iron rod that looks particularly promising. Thanks for all the help, fellas!
     
  26. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 9,908

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    You should be fine but just don't stand inline with it when you fire it up.
     
    alchemy likes this.
  27. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 4,864

    pitman
    Member
    from Hampsha

    Hopefully Tubman is the only one winging it! :)
    Determination wins.
     
  28. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,173

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'm all for fixing things, but some things I wouldn't mess with for safety reasons. I wouldn't weld a pulley or a fan. I wouldn't weld up a brake drum or spindle.
     
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  29. ;)hey beaner! I need some FREE stuff also....can you ship to my house?;)

    All joking aside, nice offer
     
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  30. 270dodge
    Joined: Feb 11, 2012
    Posts: 733

    270dodge
    Member
    from Ohio

    Then just shape and braze a piece in there(of mild steel) and have a machinist true it up. I would not be worried about the balance issue as this engine is apparently not a 6 or 7000 rpm application.
     
    volvobrynk likes this.

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