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History We ALL Love a DARE! PIX of TRULY Extinct Makes?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by jimi'shemi291, Sep 12, 2009.

  1. Ghost of ElMirage
    Joined: Mar 18, 2007
    Posts: 757

    Ghost of ElMirage
    Member

    wow
     
  2. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    I stumbled across this picture of a most interesting 1934 Chevrolet Convertible that looks to have a German Glaser Body but can't find any more information on it. :confused:
     

    Attached Files:


  3. <TABLE class="details fullwidth" sizset="2" sizcache="0"><TBODY sizset="2" sizcache="0"><TR><TD>1934 Packard Eight Convertible Sedan </TD><TD align=right></TD></TR><TR><TD style="POSITION: relative; DISPLAY: block" width=562 align=left>[​IMG]

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    <TABLE class="details fullwidth" sizset="2" sizcache="0"><TBODY sizset="2" sizcache="0"><TR><TD colSpan=2>Specifications: 120hp, 392.2 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed selective synchromesh transmission, semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel mechanical brakes. Wheelbase: 136.25"

    In an attack of unparalleled destruction, the Allied Bomber Command virtually leveled the historic city of Dresden in its February 1945 firebombing campaign. Among the various leveled factories was that of Karrosserie Gläser, a coachbuilding firm that emerged in the mid to late 19th century as a respected builder of carriages and sedan chairs for Dresden’s elite and the Royal Court of Saxony. After braving the Depression of the 1930s, Gläser had reemerged with great success, continuing its established automobile coachworks and specializing in cabriolet bodies built upon both German and American chassis, including those of Chevrolet, Ford, Buick, and Packard. Unfortunately, absorption into the German wartime production effort and subsequent nationalization under East Germany, spelled the end for a company that in the late 1930s ranked alongside Karmann as one of Germany’s most successful coachbuilders.

    While Gläser was recovering from the cancellation of a large order by Chevrolet in the early 1930s, Packard was preparing the introduction of its Eleventh Series of autos. For 1934, the Packard Eight received various detail changes, including slotted bumpers and an oil temperature regulator. Most importantly, the three new model numbers (1100, 1101, and 1102) reflected three new wheelbase lengths. At 136 1/4 inches, Model 1101 was offered in ten different body styles that included Coupe Roadster, Phaeton, Sedan, and Convertible Sedan, among other offerings.

    The Packard Convertible Sedan offered here was originally built for Ferdinand Thun, German-born cofounder of a textile empire in Pennsylvania that included Berkshire Knitting Mills, which revolutionized affordable women’s silk stockings during the 1920s. Mr. Thun frequently visited his homeland and undoubtedly ordered this custom Gläser-bodied car on one of his trips. While much of his car’s subsequent history is unknown, the car remained unrestored until 1997, when it was restored by its owner, Mr. Jeff Geraci of Michigan. Its present owner bought the car not long thereafter and has proudly displayed it at various gatherings, winning a Second in Class award at the 1999 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Other distinctions between 1997 and 1998 have included honors from the CCCA, Cuneo Museum, and the Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance. The car has also been featured in Hugo Pfau’s The Coachbuilt Packard and was a featured car for Fall 2004 in the CCCA’s publication, The Classic Car.

    Finished in handsome blue and silver with grey pin striping and a lined and well-padded dark blue top, the car generally remains in excellent condition and retains its original body panels and running boards. The luxurious interior is trimmed in German walnut and light grey leather and is likewise very presentable. The car is in good driving condition and has been exercised periodically. Befitting its coachbuilt German heritage, the interior and body lines are highlighted by Mercedes-type styling cues, including three Bosch windshield wipers, large Bosch headlamps, Waltham instruments, Sekurit glass, and two emergency brakes, one for the driver and one for the passenger. Additional options include dual side-mounted spare tires, tire-mounted rearview mirrors, and a Cormorant hood ornament. Various pieces of documentation accompany the car and include written correspondence and information detailing Gläser’s history.

    As an unusual, surviving relic of the Gläser coachworks, this Packard Eight is truly quite rare and unique. In a curious reflection of its original owner, its design and appointments are very American yet distinctively German, forming a harmonious balance of style and luxury. </TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>Addendum

    Documented one-off body
    Coach work by Glaser of Dresden, Germany
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
     
  4. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    Thanks for the GREAT information HJ. I wonder how many makes had one-offs with Glaser Bodywork. Somebody should write a book on Glaser if they haven't already.
     
  5. e.rodz
    Joined: Feb 18, 2013
    Posts: 3

    e.rodz
    Member

    signed up today learned there might be some info or people that could help me on my quest for any information on this car it is a 1909 Laverne made in Laverne MN. I have been doing some research and I can find no info on it any help would be greatly appreciated. Thats me sitting in the front seat sporting a Daniel boon jacket and this car has alot of memories for me.[​IMG]
     
  6. http://www.american-automobiles.com/Luverne.html

    The Luverne Automobile & The Luverne Automobile Co.

    Luverne
    The Luverne Automobile Co.
    Luverne, MN
    1903-1917
    The Luverne Automobile Co. produced an American Automobile called the Luverne. The Luverne was named after a town in Minnesota by the same name and attracted buyers in all parts of the northwest. In 1893 Fenton A. and Ed L Leicher, under the firm name of Leicher Brothers, established a wagon making business and then branched out to supply Automobiles based on local demand.

    <CENTER>[​IMG]
    1903 Luverne </CENTER>
    The first Luverne, built in 1903, was a complete assembled car manufactured by The St. Louis Motor Carriage Co. of St. Louis, MO. All of the parts were purchased from A. L. Dyke Automobile Supply Co. and the car assembled by The Luverne Automobile Company and branded as a Luverne. It had a one cylinder Buick engine and a three speed planetary transmission. It's success led the Leicher Brothers to design and built their own American Automobile.
    <CENTER>[​IMG]
    1905 Luverne Surrey </CENTER>
    The 1905 Luverne shown above had a 16 horsepower two cylinder motor mounted underneath the body. This car was a highwheeler with solid tires and no fenders. In addition The Luverne Automobile Co. built Runabouts and Delivery Wagons. In Minnesota and surrounding states farmers, ranchers, lawyers and doctors owned Luverne.
    <CENTER>[​IMG]
    1906 Luverne Model A Touring Car </CENTER>
    This $1250.00 5 passenger 1906 Model A Luverne Touring Car was equipped with a 20 horsepower two cylinder engine also mounted beneath the body. The engine had a 5 inch bore and 5 inch stroke. The same three speed planetary transmission with chain drive was also used.
    <CENTER>[​IMG]
    1907 Luverne Model C Runabout </CENTER>
    By 1908 the Luverne was equipped with four cylinder engines and in 1909 more advanced vehicles with six cylinder engines were produced. Their automobiles were uniform in color inside and out and were known as "The Big Brown Luverne".
    <CENTER>[​IMG]
    1911 Luverne Montana Special</CENTER>
    Some Luverne's were built for Montana buyers with special attention to the needs of that state. The 1911 Montana Special was equipped with six cylinder engines that developed 50 horsepower. It's features included a wheelbase of 126 inches, 36 x 4 1/2 inch wheels and tires, special springs and a heavy frame.
    <CENTER>[​IMG]
    1912 Luverne Specifications </CENTER>
    In 1912 Luverne came out with several new American Automobiles. The Luverne Sixty Model 760 5 to 7 passenger Touring Car priced at $2,850.00 equipped with a six cylinder Rutenber engine on 130 inch wheelbase. The Luverne Roadster Model 260 2 passenger priced at $2,750.00 equipped with a six cylinder Rutenber engine on 130 inch wheelbase. The Luverne Fifty Model 750 5 to 7 passenger priced at $2,600.00 equipped with a four cylinder Rutenber engine on 128 inch wheelbase. The Luverne Forty Model 545 5 passenger priced at $2,000.00 equipped with a four cylinder Beaver engine on 124 inch wheelbase. The Luverne Little Forty Model 540 5 passenger priced at $1,850.00 equipped with a four cylinder Beaver engine on 124 inch wheelbase.
    The Luverne Six was a large, high powered, luxuriously finished and equipped car of the very latest design in every detail. It was easy riding, quiet running and dependable. Major specifications on the 1912 Luverne included Mohair top, curtains, windshield, speedometer, clock, self starter, electric horn and trunk.
    <CENTER>[​IMG]
    1914 Luverne </CENTER>
    The Leicher Bros. made no attempt at quantity production as each automobile was hand built including the 1914 Luverne featured above. By 1916 it was apparent closed cars were in demand. Only 2 Luverne's were built in 1917. The Luverne Automobile Co. made trucks and fire trucks for many years thereafter.
    <CENTER>[​IMG]
    [B]1915 Luverne Special Speed Roadster[/B] </CENTER>Legend has it that this "Big Brown Luverne" Special Speed Roadster was built to race at the Indianapolis Speedway but various problems arose and the car never made the race. It was produced as seen above as a sports roadster.
     
  7. [​IMG]

    1908 Luverne Automobile Company Factory Photo
     
  8. [​IMG]

    1932 Luverne Open Cab, 40 gal tank,
     
  9. Video same car?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bwPg969bAA

    Published on Mar 11, 2012
    A manufacturer that you probably never heard of as Luverne was a car company from Minnesota in the early 1900s. This is 1 of 2 that exist today.
     
  10. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    I know this car well. I grew up in the AACA. Gordy Sundgaard, the guy driving was a great guy and left us at age 59 in 1982. The Luverne is now in the hands of his son Kip who doesn't really get it out. Just saw Jan Sundgaard not long ago. I believe Gordy bought the car in 1950.

    As far as two Luverne's still existing, there is supposed to be a 1905 in Luverne, Mn. that I
    understand is in pieces and a local AACA member told me that there is one in Nebraska. This is the only one I know for sure that exists.

    We actually have talked about the Luverne before on this thread Here's a link to 2 pages of Luverne postings on this thread;

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/search.php?searchid=5585767

    I also have a book with a very extensive section on the Luverne Automobile.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  11. O.Hove
    Joined: Feb 12, 2006
    Posts: 772

    O.Hove
    Member Emeritus
    from S.D.

    there was also a car by the name Allen. I had at one time a screw on hub cap for one.
     
  12. O.Hove
    Joined: Feb 12, 2006
    Posts: 772

    O.Hove
    Member Emeritus
    from S.D.

    I have 42 Chev. 2-door sedan black out model and it's for sale
     
  13. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

  14. Chesterf
    Joined: Feb 18, 2013
    Posts: 7

    Chesterf
    Member

    Just don't have the time to get through all 295 pages here so I did a site search to see if this manufacturer had been mentioned before. Saw this Armleder at the truck Show in Macungie, Pa. last summer.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. e.rodz
    Joined: Feb 18, 2013
    Posts: 3

    e.rodz
    Member

    wow thak you for that info this is a great help and brings back alot of great memories! I would of helped if my reserch would have had the right spelling. I just new what the car was not how it was spelled. thanks for the info!

    wow what a small world Thank you for the info on this awesome car that inspired me to get into cars in the first place! And your right about Gordy he was a great man everytime I here someone whistling a song I think of him as soon as I would here that I would run over to his house and ask if he needed any help.just crushed me when we got the news of his passing.
     

  16. O. Armleder & Co, Carriage and Wagon M’frs - I'd never heard of the company until now, but I found some interesting sources on the 'Net that mention the company. An online copy of the 1889 Cincinnati phone book shows that the O. Armleder & Co, Carriage and Wagon M’frs, was already in existence back in 1889. A 1999 Cincinnati Enquirer article states that the Armleder carriage company became the Armleder Motor Truck Co. in 1912, and also states that the company was sold in 1922. A webpage about Schacht trucks states that the Schacht company bought Armleder in 1935, and also states that "very little is known about the Armleder company. I couldn't find any specific mention of Armleder hearses.
    A son of German immigrants, Otto Armleder (1862-1935) founded a business that made horse-drawn carriages. In 1912 the carriage company became the Armleder Motor Truck Co., based in Over-the-Rhine. It was sold in 1922. Since Mr. Armleder's death in 1935, the trust has grown into a $27 million fund, which has distributed millions to charitable and civic projects since the 1930s.

    In 1935, Schacht acquired rival truck manufacturer Armleder, also of Cincinnati. Armleder translates lierally from German as "strong leather," so in English this would be the Rawhide Truck Company.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    1921 ArmLeder 2-ton Truck, Red, for sale in Broadway, Virginia, for $3,900.

    [​IMG]

    1922 Armleder Motor Truck Co.
    Model 30 1-1/2 Ton Dump Truck
     
  17. TexasSpeed
    Joined: Nov 2, 2009
    Posts: 4,631

    TexasSpeed
    Member
    from Texas

    I was asked in another thread to post these pictures in here. 1933 Continental Coupe.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]



    Posted from the TJJ App for iPhone & iPad
     
  18. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    That thread appears to be goin' strong! Our OWN Barry (from THIS thread) is the only owner of a RUNNING Continental in the Western Hemisphere, and he's posted new info over there, not previously posted here. Good read! Recommended.
     
  19. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Not the first compressed-air car, of course;), but for 1936 it is interesting.:) It seems this guy, [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]J.M. Custer of Piggott, Arkansas, was a pretty clever home engineer! Back then, 35 mph [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]was the national speed limit, even on the best roads or highways. I wonder if the proto-[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]type was kept, or did Custer just tear it up and use parts on other tinkering projects???:confused::confused:[/FONT]


    [​IMG]
     
  20. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 18,433

    swi66
    Member

    [​IMG]

    This 1912 Heitchen, in particular, is a noteworthy bike. It is the only one of this model known to be built by John Heitchen in Buffalo, New York, and one of possibly three bikes Heitchen built using borrowed parts and some hand-made components that are unique to his bike. The four-stroke V-twin engine resembles the Curtiss V-twin of the same time frame; however, the cylinders were made by the builder, presumably at a forge in the Buffalo area. The Heitchen engine has no kick starter or pedals &#8211; it was started by a hand crank &#8211; and the two-speed transmission was custom-made of aluminum, with foot pedals on both footboards to engage and disengage the clutch and apply the brake. The transmission was engaged by a long lever on the left side of the bike. The front suspension uses dual bicycle forks, similar to other bikes of the era, with the rear unit rigid mounted between the handlebars, frame and a lower pivot; the front fork connects to the other end of the pivot and the front axle on the bottom and has a single hydraulic tube at the top to soften the impact of potholes. There is no rear suspension, save the bicycle seat springs. A lockable tool box mounted in the frame just forward of the rear fender. Both fuel and oil are contained in the same in frame tank below the seat. Two handlebar grips controlled throttle and spark advance. The external primary chain turns the front sprocket on the transmission to the rear bicycle chain, and the only brake on the bike was a small band around the rear wheel hub.
    The bike was passed down to Heitchen&#8217;s daughter and was on display at the New York State Museum along with other New York State-built bikes before it was sold and eventually ended up in the private collection of Marv and Deb Moltrup of Genuine Cycle Vintage Parts in LeRoy, New York. For more pictures of the bike, visit GenuineCycle.com.
    Saw this on the Hemming's Blog, as a one of a kind, and a survivor, not extinct. But seeing as it was made in Buffalo NY, I had to share.

     
  21. wrench409
    Joined: Oct 16, 2006
    Posts: 372

    wrench409
    Member Emeritus
    from Here

    Told ya these were some pretty fart smellers over here, uh smart fellers......;)
     
  22. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    We've often discussed ultra-rare prototype or coachbuilt convertibles on this thread:cool:,
    from the Henry J and Hudson Jet, to the Packard Hawk and Barry's Continental Mark II.
    They are IMMENSELY enjoyable to view, mainly because practically everything has a dif-
    ferent "character" when rendered in 'vert form, don't you think?:rolleyes:

    Gorgeous just to eyeball! But WHY do some prototypes NOT get produced, huh?:confused: Photo
    of the one-and-only '63 Riviera 'vert was turned up by "Paul" at Curbside Classics and
    posted on the Hemmings blogs by their prolific Daniel Strohl last September.



    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    And a couple of detail shots of this Bill Mitchell style
    masterpiece, thanks to the GM Heritage Center.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And a nice side view, on the GM Styling Patio,
    thanks to Reynolds Buick/GMC Blogspot.
     
  23. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    Attached Files:

  24. 54fordgasser
    Joined: Apr 18, 2009
    Posts: 136

    54fordgasser
    Member
    from Kansas

    For my senior thesis I am researching the Washington automobile manufactured by the Carter Motor Car Company from 1909 to 1912. Here are some photographs of the car in its current collection. SUNROOFCORD already shared some information on the car manufacturer's history.

    Before I weigh in, I would love to hear if anyone else out there knows anything about the car! I am still looking for information and would be VERY interested in old photographs, literature, parts, or knowledge!
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  25. zaktoo
    Joined: May 11, 2010
    Posts: 23

    zaktoo
    Member

    54fordgasser, I have specs for one of the Washington models in my database. I'll see what else I can dig up.

    BTW, are you interested in the Carter Twin Engined car too or not?
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013

  26. I absolutely agree- the drop-top Riviera SHOULD have happened! GM should have made a '66-'67 Chevy II/Nova convertible as well- I've seen a few nice examples made from '62-'63's.
     
  27. zaktoo
    Joined: May 11, 2010
    Posts: 23

    zaktoo
    Member

    Has the Payne-Modern been mentioned here before? 1908ish, V-4 and V-6 air-cooled motors of 24- and 36 hp respectively. 4 speed transmission, mounted on the steering column, with direct in 4th (clever transmission that by-passed the gearbox to some degree when in direct - I have an article on it that I can unearth if anyone's interested).
     
  28. 54fordgasser
    Joined: Apr 18, 2009
    Posts: 136

    54fordgasser
    Member
    from Kansas

    Zakatoo,
    That would be awesome! Yes I am interested in anything Carter or Washington related!

    Thank you much,
    Casey
     
  29. rittmeister
    Joined: Jun 10, 2010
    Posts: 64

    rittmeister
    Member
    from texas

  30. zaktoo
    Joined: May 11, 2010
    Posts: 23

    zaktoo
    Member

    Here's info on the Carter Twin Engine car, this is from The Motor, June 1908. I managed to find details for the Washington A-1 and B-2 models. They're up on my site.
    [​IMG]
     

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