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Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

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  1. sixdogs
    Joined: Oct 11, 2007
    Posts: 635

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    **Assuming you mean the hot babes, I keep telling you they sure are still available to modern man. They are just older, as the photo below indicates. These ladies today are the young women we oogle at from 40 years ago.
    Pay attention on this . Older babes that are still presentable are still relatively hot.

     
  2. Rod Zombie
    Joined: Apr 28, 2010
    Posts: 142

    Rod Zombie
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    from Florida

    Cigarettes must be good for you. How can Santa, The Duke, The Gipper, Lucy, Jack Webb, Kirk Douglas, Tyrone Power, and Bing Crosby all be wrong about cigarette smoking?
     
  3. hotrd32
    Joined: May 16, 2007
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    From the Seattle Times ....thought it was cool
    [​IMG]
     
  4. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
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    I can think of at least three that died of cancer, don't know about santa but he quit coming to my house a bunch of years ago.
     
  5. Andy
    Joined: Nov 17, 2002
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    I know the Duke died of lung cancer. I think Jack Webb also.
     
  6. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
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    Of course, Rod was making a tongue-in-cheek observation about how times and perceptions have changed. It's almost hilarious to see people we TRUSTED shilling for cigs. :p Smoking used to be the cool thing to do and even seen as a rite of passage to adulthood.

    As a kid, when ya see pix of Doug Mac Arthur, the Duke, Bogey, a world-class female skier, the Marlboro Man, and even Fred and Wilma Flintstone smoking, what do you want to do? Nothing political here at all. Those heroes died (except Fred/Wilma who stopped before they became extinct!), at least partly from the pulmonary effects of smoking. It doesn't mean that the old ads aren't hilarious to see. Puts it in perspective, part of the reason this thread is so cool. It's reality, old and new. :cool:


    [​IMG]

    Old ad just makes ya feel secure ALL over, eh?
     
  7. Hot Rod Elvis
    Joined: Jan 24, 2011
    Posts: 606

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    Haha, Jack Webb says smoking two packs a day makes him feel Feel good! I can't believe how companies used to advertise by saying they'll make you look and feel younger. Just one reason I'll never smoke.
     
  8. Back in the day, smoking was as routine as houses with lead based paint, asbestos wrapped heat ducts, and science teachers letting kids play with mercury and hold it in their bare hands - been there, done all of that.

    I suppose many of us when in our early teens were considered a sissy if we didn't sneak a smoke in shop class, or light one up in the back of the bus on the way home from school.

    In basic training the DIs didn't let us "light up" for nearly 2 weeks into boot camp - thought we were gonna die! And C-rations contained a small box of cigs in 'em. Later on, I remember living in the barracks, every pay day my roomie & I would each buy a carton of cigs for $2 a CARTON! They would last us till next pay day (2 weeks away).

    Like many of the great memories in this thread - That's Just the Way it Was. The Good Old Days!
     
  9. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
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    Yea I'm still pissed about doing police calls, picking up other people's cigs and having to put them in my pocket.
     
  10. Johnny99
    Joined: Nov 5, 2006
    Posts: 871

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    Man am I old! Remember Curious George [the monkey] childrens books? George's friend the man with the yellow hat is enjoying a smoke in one of my old books. Never to young to light up:rolleyes:
    John
     
  11. MrFire
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    MrFire
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    MrFire
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  25. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
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    Things sure were different back then.
    Can you imagine marketing this today?
    <TABLE border=0 cellPadding=0 width=700 height=1><TBODY><TR><TD height=16 vAlign=top width=700 colSpan=2>
    [​IMG]
    </TD></TR><TR><TD height=16 vAlign=top width=700 colSpan=2>
    This was the most elaborate Atomic Energy educational set ever produced, but it was only only available from 1951 to 1952. Its relatively high price for the time ($50.00) and its sophistication were the explanation Gilbert gave for the set's short lifespan. Today, it is so highly prized by collectors that a complete set can go for more than 100 times the original price.​
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


    Instead, they market dolls to young girls that are all "tarted" up!

    And boys can't get enough video games.
     
  26. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 15,598

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    And the Gilbert kit was far from the only "Atomic toy"
    http://www.orau.org/ptp/collection/atomictoys/atomictoys.htm


    <TABLE border=0 cellPadding=0 width=700 height=26><TBODY><TR><TD height=28 vAlign=top width=700 colSpan=2>
    <BIG><BIG>Porter Atomic Energy Kit (late 1940s, 1950s)</BIG></BIG>
    </TD></TR><TR><TD height=16 vAlign=top width=700 colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD height=16 vAlign=top width=700 colSpan=2>
    [​IMG]
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
     
  27. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
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    [​IMG]

    Orangeport bridge collapse, 1992
     
  28. John F
    Joined: Sep 9, 2010
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    Gilbert had a lot of cool educational toys!
     
  29. sixdogs
    Joined: Oct 11, 2007
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    In the '50's and '60's, every kid either had a chemistry set or wanted one.
    Replacement chemicals could usually be bought at the drug store and many an hour was spent in the basement or attic working with them.
     
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