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Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

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  1. Bullet Nose
    Joined: Nov 20, 2001
    Posts: 2,071

    Bullet Nose
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    I studied that photo and thought it may have been taken west of Needles at the turn off for US 95 (to Searchlight) from the not yet completed I-40.
     
  2. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
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    [​IMG]

    Hey! Not bad. Sort of looks like Exner and Teague teamed up,
    doesn't it? Chrysler meets Packard! :eek:
    [​IMG]

    Wild to think that Exner & crew considered going THAT far with
    the fins (which were STILL pretty wild on the production '57 300)!
    Fascinating, even in clay and even without the benefit of chrome
    and stainless trim. :cool: Front fenders seem close to the way they
    wound up, though the roofline seems to be similar to that of
    the Norseman -- must have been a touch Exner fell in love with.
     
  3. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
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  4. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
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  5. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
    Member

  6. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
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  7. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
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  8. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
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    [​IMG]

    I doubt this looks like this today.
     
  9. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
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  10. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
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    Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles

    1938
    [​IMG]

    1940
    [​IMG]
     
  11. sixdogs
    Joined: Oct 11, 2007
    Posts: 635

    sixdogs
    BANNED
    from C

    May, 1940, St Louis
     
  12. bluemoose
    Joined: Dec 21, 2008
    Posts: 305

    bluemoose
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    Van Nuys Blvd,
    1911
    [​IMG]

    1926
    [​IMG]

    1927
    [​IMG]

    1946
    [​IMG]

    1940' / 1950's
    [​IMG]

    1952
    [​IMG]

    1960's
    [​IMG]

    late 1960's
    [​IMG]
     
  13. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
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    Who doesn't LOVE concept cars??? (Somebody shout out if this is a repost, okay?)

    [​IMG]
    This GM "Car of the Future," was as envisioned in 1962 for the Seattle World's Fair. Thanks for this visual retrospective go to a pretty fantastic site called Paleo-Future!
     
  14. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
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    [​IMG]
    <!-- End Description -->
    [​IMG]
    <!-- End Description -->
    Two keen 1949 photos showing a V-8 being played with at Kaiser-Frazer. I'd read some time back that a Graham-Paige engineer named Potter had drawn up a V-8 design at the time the final Graham models were flopping in the market place. Since the company was near collapse, the design went onto the shelf, and Potter popped up after the war at K-F, joining his old boss, Joe Frazer. Seems too much of a coincidence to assume that the above engine was not of Potter's input, IMO. But again, a company was unable to muster the money to mass-produce a V-8. Still, all signs add up that this G-P/K-F design is Potter's same essential design which FINALLY found its way into AMC engine compartments, giving AMC a horsepower package to go with its already well-known economy models. I need to thank Walter Miller of AutoLit.com without whom I never would have laid eyes on an engine I could not previously be SURE had ever actually been cast and machined! As far as I knew previously, there was no hard evidence that the G-P (K-F) design ever made it off the shelf! FYI, if any HAMB collector finds these two pix exciting, Walter offers NEW prints of both on eBay, at reasonable cost. Just search: "1949 Kaiser Frazer Engine Factory Photo." THANKS again, Walter!
     
  15. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
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    [​IMG]

    This full-size clay model is what Packard designers had intended

    to be the 1957 Caribbean convertible. Styling would have carried
    over to a two-door hardtop, but a four-door hardtop was also in
    the plans - as was a limousine version. Sincere THANKS to
    PackardInfo.com.
     
  16. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
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    [​IMG]

    This full-size clay model is what Packard designers had
    intended to be the 1957 Four Hundred, continuing in two-
    door hardtop form. The styling would have likely carried
    over to a Patrician four-door sedan, but a Patrician/Four
    Hundred four-door hardtop was also in the plans.


    [​IMG]

    This full-size clay model is what Packard designers had intended
    to be the 1957 Clipper, in two-door hardtop form. Four-door Clippers
    in both hardtop and sedan styles were also in the plans.
     
  17. #22411
    This station was on the SW corner of SE Oak Grove Blvd. & SE McGloughlin Blvd. in Milwaukie Oregon. (15 miles S of Portland) It was a gearhead hangout in the early 70's. Laid a few "patches" of rubber there myself.

    Later it became a Shell station. Then closed in the early 1990's for years, now it's gone and there's a Jack-in-the-Box on the same spot.
     
  18. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
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    [​IMG]


    He may be the BEST pro fighter whom most people never even heard of, as he died suddenly, tragically in his prime in 1933.

    William Lawrence "Young" Stribling, Jr., was admired as much as a technical fighter by Jim Corbett and Jim Jeffries as "Strib" admired them as his own boxing heroes. He preferred to triumph on points, not brute tactics. At the risk of stretching an analogy, Young Stribling probably had all the talent and physical tools of Jack Dempsey but not the killer instinct. He trained constantly, read the Bible, prayed before fights, never drank and loved his parents, family and Georgia community.

    But going pro in 1921 while still in high school, Strib amassed 285 pro bouts in his remaining dozen years. He was beaten only 12 times and only knocked out once, by TKO. Yet Strib knocked out 126 opponents (per RING magazine), second only to fellow heavyweight Archie Moore's 130 pro knockouts.

    RING named the Schmeling-Stribling fight of July 1931 THE fight of the year. Dominating the first six rounds, the 26-year-old Strib nearly went the full 15 before being handed a TKO -- the only time he was knocked out in a pro match. With that bell went what is still considered by boxing historians as Strib's best-ever chance at the world boxing championship. There was no rematch, as Young Stribling was killed riding his Harley-Davidson to visit his wife and newborn son at a Macon, GA, hospital in October 1933. His death was tragic both because of the family he left behind (the couple had three sons) but also because Strib was snuffed out in his prime.

    [​IMG]

    Challenger Bill "Young" Stribling, 186 pounds, attempts a left
    on Max Schmeling, 189, in a 15-rounder, July 3, 1931, Cleveland.
    Strib owned the early rounds, but with only 14 seconds remain-
    ing in the final round, referee George Blake called Strib out on
    a TKO, the only time he was knocked out in his career. Schmeling
    retained the world championship. Dying at 28 in 1933, Strib
    never got a rematch with Max. Historical photo is THANKS to
    BoxRec Boxing Encyclopaedia!
     
  19. mrspeedyt
    Joined: Sep 26, 2009
    Posts: 609

    mrspeedyt
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    our '50 ford family car... with fully functioning chopped top and plaque in 1952.
     
  20. v8nutter
    Joined: Dec 23, 2010
    Posts: 110

    v8nutter
    Member

    A Heenan and Froude Dynomometre 1910[​IMG]
     
  21. v8nutter
    Joined: Dec 23, 2010
    Posts: 110

    v8nutter
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  22. jroberts
    Joined: Oct 14, 2008
    Posts: 1,639

    jroberts
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    That looks about like the one I owned in the late '60's. Mine had both headlights, but had its nicks and dings as well. Had an MGA 1522c.c. engine and the rear end was from a Riley as I recall. As light as it was it was pretty quick and handled like it was on rails. Build quality was not so hot. I found the hood unstable at speed, blowing off one time. I kept in on with small leather straps after that. There was soldier here who also had an Elva, but his was red and had been a BMC team backup car at LeMans. I would love to have another one, it was a fun car.
     
  23. jroberts
    Joined: Oct 14, 2008
    Posts: 1,639

    jroberts
    Member

    Like the links about this said, over cultivation left nothing to hold the soil down. A drought and wind and the dust bowl was bound to happen. Much of my Grandmother's family lived in Long Island, Kansas and I remember listening with disbelief and awe to the stories they told of being caught in those "storms." Darker than a cloudy midnight, even with headlights on in the middle of the day you could not see where you were going. The wife of one of my dad's cousins told me that the car they were driving stopped running because the dirt in the air simply choked it off. Her brother tried to get help, but got lost walking down a road he had lived on his whole life. He ended up circling around and came back to the car without know exactly how he got there. Folks would put towels and such in the cracks under and around doors and windows to keep the dust out, but within a short time there would be two inches of the stuff everywhere in the house.

    Bad times indeed.
     
  24. Deuce Daddy Don
    Joined: Apr 27, 2008
    Posts: 5,097

    Deuce Daddy Don
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Best "Companion" in the world!!!!:D:D
     
  25. Deuce Daddy Don
    Joined: Apr 27, 2008
    Posts: 5,097

    Deuce Daddy Don
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    How many of you knew that GENE AUTRY (COWBOY FAME) was the owner of not only LOS ANGELES ANGEL"S baseball team, BUT also ASSOCIATED PETROLEM PRODUCTS??????????
     
  26. vividlyvintage
    Joined: Aug 17, 2010
    Posts: 671

    vividlyvintage
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    It is on NETFLIX I watched it for the first time. It is really awesome!
     
  27. 4tl8ford
    Joined: Sep 1, 2004
    Posts: 1,087

    4tl8ford
    Member
    from Erie, Pa

    Trucks on Pennsylvania Turnpike protesting.
    Location: PA, US
    Date taken: April 1948
    Photographer: Francis Miller
     
  28. South_paw
    Joined: Aug 19, 2010
    Posts: 560

    South_paw
    Member
    from America

  29. I think you would find that he is putting a top dressing on the canvas that was used in the early days to fill in the center of the top. Later cars were built with full size one piece metal tops. In the early days they simply did not have presses large enough to stamp a whole top, called a turret in the vernacular of the day.
     
  30. fbi9c1
    Joined: Sep 29, 2010
    Posts: 1,226

    fbi9c1
    Member

    My dad's medical office occupied a large portion of the 6th Floor of this building from about 1940 to 1962. 3875 Wilshire Blvd. "The Wilshire Professional Bldg." The other tall one is the Wiltern Bldg. which has a famous L.A. theater on the ground level.
     
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