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Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

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  1. George Klass
    Joined: Dec 31, 2007
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    Gasoline. All the engines in the LAFD "back in the day" were gasoline engines. Actually, I don't remember just how long they could run before running out of fuel, although I have seen them pumping for 3 or 4 hours at a time. FS017_1950-000c_EngineCompany17_1500.jpg
    A 7-man engine company plus a captain. Today,, you are lucky to get 4 guys on an engine company in L.A.

    sn001073-1937ALF-DuplexPump-2-1250gpm_Magee-0000-0000_E17-open_1000.gif

    sn001073-1937ALF-DuplexPump-2-1250gpm_ga-1949-1211_E17_850.gif

    sn001074-1937ALF-DuplesPump-2-1250gpm_uk_0000-0000_E3_1000.gif
    At a big fire on a chilly night, I used to stand pretty close to these things (with my fingers in my ears), they put out a lot of heat.
     
  2. swi66
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  3. George Klass
    Joined: Dec 31, 2007
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    sn001079-1938ALF-Manifold_Magee_0000-0000_E9-comp_1000.gif
    These are the cross-lay bays on the Hose Wagons, all for 2 1/2-inch lines.

    sn001079-1938ALF-ManifoldWagon-75-80_dm-0000-0000_E27_850.gif
    The process was pretty simple. Both the Hose Wagon and the Pumper would stop at a hydrant. The Hose Wagon would lay a pair of 3 1/2-inch supply lines down the block from the hydrant to the building on fire. The Duplex Pumper would hook up to one or two hydrants and pump water to the Hose Wagon. The two hoses entering the rear of the Hose Wagon were the supply lines. The guys on the Hose Wagon would hook up as many of the 2 1/2-inch lines as they needed to fight the fire. In this photo, they have 6 or 7 lines hooked up (on the drivers side) going into whatever is burning. That is alot of water. The LAFD had about 6 or 7 of these Duplex pumper/Hose Wagon combination engine companes located in various parts of the city, typically in the high value areas (as in movie studios, lumber yards, etc.), and they served into the late 1960's.
     
  4. blueprint2002
    Joined: Dec 25, 2018
    Posts: 230

    blueprint2002

    Thanks George. More wonderful pics of the LAFD guys and their machinery.
    I had guessed the V12s you mentioned could have been Detroit Diesel 12V71, but you've already said they were gasoline. Who was the maker then? V12s have never been made by too many companies.
    Back to the pumper. If it did run out of fuel, and was still needed at the fire, was there some SOP: return to station to refuel? Or replace with another pumper? Not an easy decision: both options have their built-in problems.
     
  5. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 3,289

    jnaki




    upload_2019-3-4_3-29-25.png
    Hello,

    Nice historic post of the coastal Santa Monica/Malibu area. Having driven down this portion of the Coast Highway from 1953 (countless times), up to the most recent in November 2018, gives thought to how much it has changed during our driving history. This portion of the PCH Highway 1 through the Santa Monica area leading into Malibu is quite changed. The road is wider and consequently the lanes are less curvy. Back in these early photo days, the drive was more hectic as the road curved around those tall cliffs that ran along the highway.


    Even in the early 1960s, the road was still curvy and one slight blink at the wrong time caused a non friendly accident. (single line divider=6 inches, double yellow 15” wide between oncoming traffic) Back then, there were quite a few on this stretch of the coastal highway. Since the highway got wider and the curves were made less curvy, a middle lane divider helped with the dangerous corner. (first, double,then a set double lines made it a little safer)

    The fabulous 30s-40s era multi-story house still stands and looks pretty much as it did back then. (The Getty Villa) But, is now surrounded by plenty of ocean view homes. Sometimes a quick glance can spot the house. This corner makes “eyes on the road” mandatory, so the passenger is the only one that could possibly see the historic building.

    Jnaki

    This Coast Highway is part of one great drive, all along the ocean shoreline from the Santa Monica Pier to the giant rock at the edge of Point Mugu. It is a 35+ mile drive that is the quintessential, So Cal scenery. It is a “must do” for every traveler in the area, as it makes one feel at ease with nature. Be warned, it is not a sleepy eyed drive, by any means. Paying attention while driving, is the utmost in importance, especially on this highway.


     
  6. jeepster
    Joined: Nov 17, 2005
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    from wisconsin

  7. jeepsterhemi
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    Here is that DeDion-Bouton car again....

    Cars-165.png
     
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  16. B-26 Marauder ........... Thanks Jeepster!
    [​IMG]
     
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  29. George Klass
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    Although I never saw it in action, the LAFD did have a fuel tanker truck for refuling apparatus (pumpers typically) in the field at large fires.

    As far as the V12 engines, both American LaFrance and Seagrave manufatured their own gasoline V12 engines. This eventually led the LAFD to remove ALF from recieveing bids for new LAFD apparatus for many years. LAFD's bids in the late 1960's up until they went with diesel engines required that all new apparatus be equipped with Hall Scott straight-6 gasoline engines. These were huge displacement engines and were very reliable. ALF refused to use them, they wanted to only install their own engines. Seagrave also refused at first, but finally agreed to use the Hall Scott engines. Mack was another fire engine company that only wanted to install their own engines, and to my knowledge, the LAFD never ordered another Mack fire engine after the 1960's. The City of Los Angeles is 500 square miles in size, and more than 25% of it is in the foothills. Apparently, nothing climbed those hills better than the Hall Scott engines.

    Eventually, the LAFD went almost exclusively with a local Los Angeles company called Crown Fire Coach, a company that had been building busses since the horse drawn days. The Crown Fire Coach was not only an advance design, they were located in downtown L.A. (no shipping charge), offered completely customized equipment, and would install anything (engines, pumps, etc.) that the LAFD wanted. They started ordering from Crown in 1953 in small quantities until eventually, the Department was almost completely Crown equipped.
    54Crown_BenRay.jpg
    This is a 1954 Crown. Shorter wheelbase (important for the Hollywood Hills) and seating for a 4-man crew with nobody on the tailboard.

    fire1_zpsabzywteu.jpg
    Here is a photo of the Pumper/Hose Wagon combination built for the LAFD by Crown Fire Coach in the early 1960's. The Hose Wagon is almost exactly the same design only more compact than the old ones, and the Pumper had only a single pump, but it was 3000 Gal/minute, which duplicated what the old Duplex Pumpers could put out, and it could also be used as a normal triple combination fire engine (it had a water tank, ladders, and carried hose).
     
  30. sliceddeuce
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