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Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

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  1. 1952, Tallahassee Florida:
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  2. Early Tele-tubbies? :eek: Nope. They are Russian Cosmonaut 'action figures' from about 1960:
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  3. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Posted by SWI
    [​IMG]


    Gary, haven't seen this pic before of Brynner, Bronson, McQueen and Vaughan
    in an off-duty moment while filming "The Magnificent Seven." We all know that
    in his salad days Steve worked straight scale wages to pay his rent and eat by
    starring in the surprise 1958 moneymaker "The Blob.":rolleyes:

    But what was Robert Vaughan doing in '58:confused:, long before "Seven" or Napoleon Solo?
    ANS: "Teenage Caveman" :eek: for Roger Corman's AIP (American International Pictures),
    created by Corman solely for making B-movies, well suited to the drive-in theater
    audience! Doesn't Bob look right at home as a caveman? :p Styled hair, no tan ... NO
    DIRT? And look at that bow and arrow he's battling the awful prehistoric beast with!
    Suppose he borrowed it from his little cavebrother? :D

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    Teenage Caveman poster art thanks to (from top) SilkPoster.com, FlickRiver and WaffyJohn
    on FlickR.
     
  4. pitbullgirl
    Joined: Oct 27, 2012
    Posts: 3

    pitbullgirl
    Member

    House address behind her is 241 found it on google earth. post#67500
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  5. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,935

    leon renaud
    Member
    from N.E. Ct.

    Periwinkle, "Winkles" Can't remember who did the tune "Somebody pinched me winkles"an edible sea snail found all along the New England coast north to Canada. Not native to North America it was introduced from Great Britainan it is thought they were introduced from stone ballast used in the days of sailing ships. Stones would be put in the bilge of ships to balance or offset cargo loads. as the ship picked up more and more cargo the ballast stone would simply be tossed overboard.the common rat was introduced to North America in the same way from shipping. If you look close at old pictures of docked ships you often see "funnels" on the mooring lines these are "rat baffles" used to stop them from running the lines and getting aboard ship.
     
  6. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][/FONT]
    Guess I can relax. :rolleyes: Did some scratching, and there was no Buick hardtop in any of the three lines for 1949. And even in '50,
    the only hardtop, apparently was the 2DH Riviera. So, apparently, Shotgun Granny in Post # 67,526 was standing in front of
    the 4DS door posts. Still, though, beautiful Buick!:)



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  7. Ester Eddie
    Joined: Feb 26, 2012
    Posts: 3,988

    Ester Eddie
    Member
    from Alaska

  8. Ester Eddie
    Joined: Feb 26, 2012
    Posts: 3,988

    Ester Eddie
    Member
    from Alaska

  9. Ester Eddie
    Joined: Feb 26, 2012
    Posts: 3,988

    Ester Eddie
    Member
    from Alaska

  10. Ester Eddie
    Joined: Feb 26, 2012
    Posts: 3,988

    Ester Eddie
    Member
    from Alaska

  11. Ester Eddie
    Joined: Feb 26, 2012
    Posts: 3,988

    Ester Eddie
    Member
    from Alaska

  12. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,935

    leon renaud
    Member
    from N.E. Ct.

    The Arrow Shirt originated in my home town of Thompson Ct. the original factory still stands about a mile from my house.Cotton mills built the villages of Grosvenordale and North Grosvenordale. The original Arrow Shirt was created by a blacksmiths wife tired of having to scrub the soot covered collar and cuffs of his shirts. She designed the removeable cuffs and collar that buttoned to the shirt body, If soiled to badly or just worn through the cuffs or collar could be thrown away without loosing the entire shirt.While several mills existed in town every building belonged to the same company and the towns were built and owned by the company. One 3 story brick building had so many looms (at the time the biggest weave shop in the country) that they had to brace the walls of the brick mill because the action of the shuttles in the looms were literally shaking the building apart !
     
  13. Ester Eddie
    Joined: Feb 26, 2012
    Posts: 3,988

    Ester Eddie
    Member
    from Alaska

    [FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Police Squad Cars with Two-way Radio Capability circa 1940s



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    [/FONT]
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  14. Ester Eddie
    Joined: Feb 26, 2012
    Posts: 3,988

    Ester Eddie
    Member
    from Alaska

    [​IMG]


    The Peugeot 402 is a family car produced in Sochaux, France from 1935 to 1942 by Peugeot. -
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  15. Rolf Harris, here's some of the word's.

    The Cockney tribes in Britain were meeting for the games
    Held annually, once a year, along the River Thames,
    The scene was quiet and peaceful, the snow lay on the ground
    The Cockneys by their cooking pots were huddled all around.
    The chief was in his tepee his face all lined with wrinkles
    When up the river came the cry
    "someone's pinched me winkles!"
    Me winkles have been pinched (oobie dooby) me winkles have been pinched,
    Now some people say it's a load of old nonsense but a winkle's got a lot of vitamin contents
     
  16. Ester Eddie
    Joined: Feb 26, 2012
    Posts: 3,988

    Ester Eddie
    Member
    from Alaska

  17. janbuick
    Joined: Feb 13, 2011
    Posts: 308

    janbuick
    Member

    I dont think it's a 1949
    look at the hood ornament it's 1951 or 1952

    [​IMG]
     
  18. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][/FONT]
    [​IMG]


    Impressive rail station view from Torrington in the Naugatuck River Valley, western Connecticut.
    It's from a picture postcard mailed in 1907 (Teddy Roosevelt was still president!). The station
    was of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, which had subsumed the old Nauga-
    tuck Railroad in 1887. Photo thanks to Wikipedia.


    [​IMG]

    Engineer Bob Lyon and Fireman Rich Edling are the proud crew, posing here in October
    1972 with their pride and joy, Steam Locomotive #103, a 38-year veteran of the Valley Rail-
    road. According to the Rail Preservation News, the photo was snapped just north of Essex,
    CT, prior to moving to its new home in Waterford on the old Naugatuck Railroad. The "Naugy,"
    as it's fondly known by rail buffs, is the operating heritage railroad of the Railroad Museum of
    New England (RMNE). 103 was built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in November 1925, for
    the Sumter & Choctaw Railroad, a small logging railway in northern Alabama. It has a 2-6-2
    wheel arrangement. To read more about the old workhorse, the Naugatuck Railroad and the
    museum, search Naugatuck Railroad. There are plenty of links, pix and videos that'll take
    you back!
     
  19. DrJ
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 9,418

    DrJ
    Member

    White Walls on a Locomotive! :cool:

     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  20. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Right you are, Jan! '51 or '52 and NOT a hardtop. The four Roadmaster fender vents seem same as the [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]photo, and the hood ornament is virtually the same. But we got it narrowed down to those two years! [/FONT]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    <!-- / message -->
     
  21. 63 Safari
    Joined: Feb 26, 2011
    Posts: 179

    63 Safari
    Member
    from Central VA

    What's the 'over-under' on that?
     
  22. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,935

    leon renaud
    Member
    from N.E. Ct.

    no white wheels the tires are bare steel not whitewalls and yes trains have tiresin fact one of the "Super trains" had a severe wreck caused basically by a tire "blow out" that went through the undercarriage and car body like a spear! occasionally in old photographs of towns you'll see a large ring hanging in a frame outside the fire station or on the town green someplace it was common to use train tires no longer fit for service as warning gongs/bells just like the steel triangles you often see in western movies used as the "lunch bell" The junk tire would be heated and split in one spot to remove it from the wheel.When working at a train museum try explaining that a visitors favorite engine is in the shop getting "new tires"!
     


  23. Wow :eek: :eek: :eek: - I like the local or regional vernacular which to some is very acceptable while others - me included - get a hoot out of it. Why, the only time I'd ever heard of this before was when reference was made to Rocky's friend Bull-winkle :p

    So now, if anyone
    tries to pinch me winkles at least I will know what they mean.

    Oh and how's 'bout some bangers & mash,or vinegar for me chips? :) Thanks for the replies & clarification.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  24. StukaBomber55
    Joined: Jul 26, 2012
    Posts: 115

    StukaBomber55
    Member

    Grandma destroyed some family heirlooms by cutting them up and writing on them. She is entering dementia and is attempting to preserve her memory making notes on everything. She shared these with me today. I promptly stole them for framing :)

    First car the family owned.

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    [​IMG]

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    Apparently grandpa Von fritsch changed his name during ww2. But grandma can't remember what he changed it to......
     
  25. sylvian
    Joined: Oct 11, 2009
    Posts: 1,042

    sylvian
    Member Emeritus
    from Burbank

    tiny tiny font.
    .
     
  26. I wish... Nowadays everyone has 40' Motor homes with Flat screen TV's in every room and a washer and dryer. :eek:
     
  27. Fixed - I think. It looked okay to me but changed it I hope. LMK. ron
     
  28. indybigjohn
    Joined: May 22, 2008
    Posts: 1,713

    indybigjohn
    Member Emeritus

    I can read the word Rustem, but my military Russian from 50 years ago isn't up to par. What does it mean?
     
  29. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,935

    leon renaud
    Member
    from N.E. Ct.

    Ah yes "vernacular" While working at EDAVille Rail Road a steam train museum I had to teach a youngun about vernacular I was at the resturaunt getting my lunch when the young lady behind the counter who was always friendly and would always smile and go out of her way for a customer looked totally exasperated!She stood there with several bags of potato chips on the counter infront of her and a family stood there equally perplexed. I asked what was going on and she told me the family was asking for potato chips but she had showed them every brand they had to no availe with that the woman standing with the family started explaining how had this young lady was trying to please them but couldn't find what they wanted 3 large sacks of chips! Just hearing the lady speak solved all their problems ( very heavy British accent). I told the young lady behind the counter "bring them 3 large orders of french fries and bring vinegar" I got "But they want potato chips!" Being from New England I simply asked her do you order"fish and french fries? or Fish and chips?" that's the "Sack of CHIPS they mean"Now I had to expain to all how I could translate "English to English" and further knew the secret of the vinegar too! It was easy My maternal line started with moms grandparents who came her from northern England and Ireland. Same reason I got all the otherwise useless information of Winkles I've eaten plenty!
     
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