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Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

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  1. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 13,552

    swi66
    Member

  2. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 13,552

    swi66
    Member

  3. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 13,552

    swi66
    Member

  4. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 13,552

    swi66
    Member

  5. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 13,552

    swi66
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  6. DJCallaghan
    Joined: Jun 12, 2009
    Posts: 17

    DJCallaghan
    Member
    from Australia

    Now THAT'S different, front driveline, steering and handling would have presented a problem or two!!
     
  7. swi66
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 13,552

    swi66
    Member

    [​IMG]
    Boulder Park, Indian Falls NY
    [​IMG]

    What's left
    [​IMG]
     
  8. That is a lakes car, they were testing it without the body. For the life of me I cant remember who's it was!
    I am sure someone will be able to fill in my failed memory.:eek:

    Doc.
     
  9. Nitro Nick
    Joined: Jun 4, 2008
    Posts: 91

    Nitro Nick
    Member

    We had this happen at a place I worked at. A truck wheel came off the left front hand side and punched its way through a double brick wall of our factory about eight feet up - glad I didn't get hit by it.:D
     
  10. Gettysburg PA 1963
    [​IMG]
     
  11. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    Hoopes Brothers & Darlington were wooden wheel manufacturers in West Chester, Pa. A Smithsonian Institution Film, we have posted on The Old motor shows the interesting craft of wooden wheel making, filmed at the wheel maker before they closed in the early 1970s.

    With the exception of some of the wagon style wooden hubs seen in the film, the process is quite close to what is involved in making an automobile or truck wheel. The first part of the film takes the process from the log and sawing it, to steaming the wood fellows in an autoclave and the fascinating process of fellow bending and finishing.

    The second part starts with making the hubs, it then moves onto assembling the hubs and spokes and next the fellows are installed onto the spokes. The steel fellow band or tire, is then cut to length, formed, welded and installed and compressed to make it tight on the wheel. Take the time to watch both parts as it is quite interesting.

    Much of the machinery that you will see in the film is similar to and some of it may possibly be as old as is seen in the 1903 advertisement (above) for the Defiance Machine Works. This link will take you to the film.
     
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