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Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

  1. jungle_josh
    Joined: May 12, 2008
    Posts: 33

    jungle_josh
    Member

    Is that Hunter s Thompson?
     
  2. In Wisconsin this was our grave digger!

    <table class="infobox vcard" style="border-spacing: 3px; width:22em;" cellspacing="3"> <tbody><tr> <th colspan="2" class="fn" style="text-align:center; font-size:125%; font-weight:bold;">Ed Gein</th> </tr> <tr class=""> <td colspan="2" class="" style="text-align:center;">[​IMG]
    Ed Gein circa 1957</td> </tr> <tr> <th colspan="2" class="" style="text-align:center;">Background information</th> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">Also known as</th> <td class="nickname" style="">The Plainfield Ghoul, The Mad Butcher</td> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">Born</th> <td class="" style="">August 27, 1906
    La Crosse, Wisconsin</td> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">Died</th> <td class="" style="">July 26, 1984 (aged 77)
    Madison, Wisconsin</td> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">Cause of death</th> <td class="" style="">Respiratory and heart failure</td> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">Conviction</th> <td class="" style="">Guilty</td> </tr> <tr> <th colspan="2" class="" style="text-align:center;">Killings</th> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">Number of victims</th> <td class="" style="">Two (known)</td> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">Country</th> <td class="" style="">United States</td> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">State(s)</th> <td class="" style="">Wisconsin</td> </tr> <tr class=""> <th scope="row" style="text-align:left;">Date apprehended</th> <td class="" style="">November 16, 1957</td> </tr> </tbody></table> Edward Theodore "Ed" Gein (<small>pron.:</small> /&#712;&#609;i&#720;n/; August 27, 1906<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference">[1]</sup> – July 26, 1984) was an American murderer and body snatcher. His crimes, committed around his hometown of Plainfield, Wisconsin, gathered widespread notoriety after authorities discovered Gein had exhumed corpses from local graveyards and fashioned trophies and keepsakes from their bones and skin. After police found body parts in his house in 1957, Gein confessed to killing two women—tavern owner Mary Hogan in 1954, and a Plainfield hardware store owner, Bernice Worden, in 1957.
    Initially found unfit to stand trial, following confinement in a mental health facility he was tried in 1968 for the murder of Worden and sentenced to life imprisonment, which he spent in a mental hospital. The body of Bernice Worden was found in Gein's shed; her head and the head of Mary Hogan were found inside his house. Robert H. Gollmar, the judge in the Gein case, wrote: "Due to prohibitive costs, Gein was tried for only one murder—that of Mrs. Worden."<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference">[2]</sup> With fewer than three murders attributed to him, Gein does not meet the traditional definition of a serial killer.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup> His case influenced the creation of several fictional serial killers, including Norman Bates from Psycho, Leatherface from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and Jame Gumb from The Silence of the Lambs.
     
  3. twin6
    Joined: Feb 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,156

    twin6
    Member
    from Vermont

    1920 Stanley, sold new in New Zealand and still there!
     
  4. 1stGrumpy
    Joined: Jan 1, 2008
    Posts: 4,150

    1stGrumpy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Her name was Dorthy Provine, a popular actress in the 50's and 60's. She passed away a few years ago.
     

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  5. DiggerODell
    Joined: Jan 4, 2013
    Posts: 32

    DiggerODell
    Member

    Mr. Gein really looks like he should be a character in the movie "Wisconsin Death Trip (1999)" . . . a very very eeeeiry flick about murders in and around Wisconsin in the early part of last century. Heck? Perhaps he was . . . am gonna have to watch it again . . .
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2013
  6. 40two
    Joined: Feb 19, 2012
    Posts: 1,416

    40two
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    this shot alone makes it completely up, Eddie! this is one of the magic shots i'm looking at for minutes, thinkin' and dreamin'! it says: look at the good times gone by .. . ..(i know, i know, the time's weren't always as good as it seems ...)

    Thanks, Eddie,

    Carsten
     
  7. geotek
    Joined: Mar 9, 2012
    Posts: 29

    geotek
    Member
    from troy, ny

    Looks just like my 36 Plymouth. The hood ornament is difficult to see but looks like it could be the plymouth.

     
  8. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,140

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    It's a 1935 or 36 Pontiac. Note the distinctive strip down the hood and grille. That's Pontiac Only. Attached is a picture of actress Helen Twelvetrees and her '35 Pontiac. '35 had front suicide doors. '36 did not. Maybe someone can enlarge the photo.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 16, 2013
  9. Model T1
    Joined: May 11, 2012
    Posts: 3,310

    Model T1
    Member

    This photo post 61505 and 61516 was also posted earlier. Had my wife get some photos out of her when she was 16, about when we met. Of course this is not her. But she agrees those photos of ours and this are identical. In fact she wanted to know where I found that old picture of her!;)
    They say we all have a twin. Hopefully my twin is not worn out like me.
    I often see something here that reminds me of better times and it's amazing that some are actually from places we've been.
    This thread has gotten addictive and I again thank everyone who posts here.
     
  10. Silhouettes 57
    Joined: Dec 9, 2006
    Posts: 2,795

    Silhouettes 57
    Member

    What the heck nobodies backed into their spot!!! TEE HEE!
     
  11. Model T1
    Joined: May 11, 2012
    Posts: 3,310

    Model T1
    Member

    As far as I remember nobody ever backed in at drive -in diners. I could get a full meal and rootbeer for under $1.00 for me and my girlfriend.
     
  12. DrJ
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 9,431

    DrJ
    Member

    Or about an hour's pay... Same as today. (close anyway)

    I don't back in now... The new power-parking is drive straight in!
     
  13. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    You can learn all about steam-powered logging in a post on TheOldMotor.com filled with photos and a video all about the Lombard Steam Log Hauler.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,933

    leon renaud
    Member
    from N.E. Ct.

    I don't know the bullet weight but this was the biggest cannon ever built in WWII on anything and it was just about useless because there was no way other than moving the gun on the tracks to aim it! they had elevation but no windage the only thing the could do was use a turn in the railbed to move the muzzle left or right !
     
  15. 31 B'ville
    Joined: Feb 7, 2009
    Posts: 212

    31 B'ville
    Member
    from SE Pa

    The car in post #61570 is a 1936 Pontiac. The hood ornament is '36 and the headlight mounts are '36 also. 1935 Pontiac headlights mount on the fenders, not the grill shell.
     
  16. six pack to go
    Joined: Aug 2, 2008
    Posts: 1,938

    six pack to go
    Member
    from new jersey

    Joan Crawford...
     

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  17. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,140

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    Thanks. I knew there had to be a difference between '35 and '36 besides the doors but I couldn't put my finger on it.
     
  18. flthead
    Joined: Jan 13, 2013
    Posts: 43

    flthead
    BANNED
    from Midwest


    Thats a great shot.
     
  19. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,500

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Leon, right you are.;) Hard to maneuver (and Doc said that it was not very practical and, in fact, outmoded by WWII). Of course the "bullets" were referred to in artillery as "shells," but that's a minor point.

    Just as in WWI, the logistics guys' big challenge: They had to construct roadbeds and lay down rails, pretty much aligning the gun with pre-chosen target(s). It's not as though they could wheel in on existing railroads and let off a round or two, then move on.

    Not being critical at all here. The "Big Bertha" type of rifled cannon were task-built; and those behind the projects knew what a logistical challenge would be involved, getting them into the battlefield and getting (accurate) shots off.:p

    THANKS, Leon, and everybody who gave input on these strange (BUT VERY SCARY) weapons of a bygone age! Practical aerial bombardment (and, later, guided missiles) made these guns scrap, or military curios.
     
  20. 327-365hp
    Joined: Feb 5, 2006
    Posts: 5,317

    327-365hp
    Member
    from Mass

    January 16, 1919: U.S. Ratifies the 18th Amendment

    On this day in 1919, anti-alcohol activists proclaimed success when the Eighteenth Amendment was ratified. Taking effect the following year, it banned the consumption and sale of alcohol.

    [​IMG]
    Alcohol, discovered by Prohibition agents during a raid on an illegal distillery, pours out of upper windows of three-story storefront in Detroit during Prohibition.


    [​IMG]
    Flappers drink bootleg alcohol in unison, ca. 1925 Photograph via Corbis.

    [​IMG]
    Cow shoes,&#8221; made from cow hooves or wood, were used by moonshiners during Prohibition to hide their tracks and evade customs officials. Photograph Courtesy of Library of Congress.

    [​IMG]
    Men pour whiskey into the sewer. Photograph via Corbis.

    [​IMG]
    Prohibition agents examine some of the three thousand bottles of liquor hidden in a coal steamer in New York Harbor. Photograph via AP Images.

    [​IMG]
    What appeared to be an innocent truckload of lumber, turned out to be a bootlegger&#8217;s vehicle loaded with prime scotch when the Los Angeles Federal Prohibition Agents smelled the odor of a broken bottle. Investigation disclosed a cleverly concealed trapdoor of board ends leading to the interior, from which 70 cases of liquor were taken. The device is said to be the most ingenious ever caught here. October 23, 1926

    [​IMG]
    The aftermath of the Saint Valentine&#8217;s Day Massacre of February 14, 1929. Seven members of the North Side Gang were trapped in a garage, lined up against the wall, and shot with sawed-off shotguns. According to the Chicago police, the cause of the murders was illicit gangster-controlled liquor traffic. Photograph via Corbis.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2013
  21. 327-365hp
    Joined: Feb 5, 2006
    Posts: 5,317

    327-365hp
    Member
    from Mass

    This must have been crazy!

    [​IMG]

    September 3rd, 1967, Stockholm, Sweden: The day Sweden changed from driving on the left to driving on the right.
     
  22. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,500

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    <TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=6 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD style="BORDER-BOTTOM: 1px inset; BORDER-LEFT: 1px inset; BORDER-TOP: 1px inset; BORDER-RIGHT: 1px inset" class=alt2>Originally Posted by T-Head [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    You can learn all about steam-powered logging in a post on TheOldMotor.com filled with photos and a video all about the Lombard Steam Log Hauler.

    [​IMG]

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    Thats a great shot.

    You can say THAT again!:D The cool thing about this HAMB thread (and member Dave/T-Head who has "THE OLD MOTOR" website:cool:) is that these AWESOME sights and technologies would be totally unknown to 99 percent of even the folk interested in VINTAGE practical engineering;), were it not for Dog's thread. (There'll be those who disagree with me; but I say that Dog's thread tends to put all this in common terms -- and permits helpful conversation -- such that even a dumbass like ME can understand and get excited about it!:D)

    KEEP IT UP, in addition to the VINTAGE shots of rods & customs:cool:, which are the anchor of this thread! [/QUOTE]
     
  23. My understanding is that they would build a circular rail bed and move it around the circle to aim it in a different direction.
     
  24. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,500

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Thanks, John!:) I didn't know the specifics to that extent.
     
  25. dad-bud
    Joined: Aug 22, 2009
    Posts: 3,888

    dad-bud
    Member

    You are absolutely right there 327-365, why the hell would they want to change so they're driving on the wrong side of the road????
    (Hey, it's been a quiet day, and I just decided we all needed a little excitement in our lives).
    (Haha) ;);) :rolleyes::rolleyes:
     

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