Register now to get rid of these ads!

Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. DJCruiser
    Joined: Jan 15, 2012
    Posts: 316

    DJCruiser
    Member
    from CT

  2. And the CT-33 Silver Star . I can still hear the sound of the Rolls-Royce engine. :)

    [​IMG][/QUOTE]My dad worked on the American version of these little birds at McChord afb{now called "Joint base Lewis/McChord} From the time they were new{1955-56?} till he retired at the same time they did. T-33 trainers were used for damn near any kind of non-combat mission you could think of. Pulling target drones,v.i.p. and inter-base shuttles,bringing Coors beer back from mountain home afb 'cause you couldnt get it here at the time...kind of an airborn version of a jeep.
     
  3. 327-365hp
    Joined: Feb 5, 2006
    Posts: 5,418

    327-365hp
    Member
    from Mass

    Looks like it says Fairchild on the cowl.

    [​IMG]

    Found this on the UTA Facebook page

    AR317-19-24

    Love is in the Air

    Credit: Basil Clemons Photograph Collection

    In 1929, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Reeding celebrated their “60th honeymoon anniversary” with a flight from their hometown of Breckenridge to neighboring Abilene. The two stepped aboard the Braniff Fairchild aircraft wearing their Sunday best. The radiant couple belie their age – he in his 88th year, she a mere 80 years young. Pioneer commercial photographer, Basil Clemons (1887-1964), recorded the event with a warmth and naturalness that is typical of his work. The Basil Clemons Photograph Collection is comprised of some 18,000 images that document the oil boom town of Breckenridge from 1919 to 1948. Other subjects of his lens include the circus, fairs, Wild West shows, store interiors, street scenes, ranches, sporting events, fires, floods, and the oil field.

    The University of Texas at Arlington Library offers a diverse collection of materials on the history of Texas and the Southwest. Each week, readers get a glimpse of the past with an image from Special Collections. 817-272-3393, www.uta.edu/library/spco
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  4. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member


    As the story goes......in 1929, the Boeing Company was soo big the Gov. is forcing it to split up, much like it did with ATT 20 years ago.

    Bill Boeing had surveyors in Los Angeles to pursue land to build an Airport.
    The Lockheed brothers had just moved from Santa Monica to Hollywood and Bill was having lunch the the Lockheed Bros. foreman, a guy named John "Jack" Northrop.
    Jack is telling Bill about his ideas of stretching aluminum skins on forms to fit on wings. Bill says....Wow.....I like that thought.......I'm building an Airport over the hill at Rancho Providencia Burbank and I will build you a foundry were you can test this idea.

    United airport opened May 1st 1930, Boeing had split into 3 companies, Boeing, United and Hamilton.
    Jack opened his first company Avion Corp. and below is a photo of Jack flying the plane he built in his foundry, his first Wing, flying over Hanger 1 at United (Burbank) Airport, the small building to the top is Al Menasco's engine shop and the long corrugated steel shed is the foundry that Bill built for Jack.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. 327-365hp
    Joined: Feb 5, 2006
    Posts: 5,418

    327-365hp
    Member
    from Mass

    Fairchild 71C from Wiki. This one is fitted with pontoons.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    :DALTERNATE CAPTION - "While
    experimenting with new and
    exotic fuel mixe
    s for his brand
    new AA/Fuel dragster, Bert suddenly
    - and tragically, one second too
    late (!:eek:) - discovered *precisely*
    why the NHRA had banned
    Hydrazine!!!
    "
    :eek::eek::eek::D
     
  7. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

    This one is a Fokker Tri-motor, built in the USA, not sure what the first one is..
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  8. Curly Hand
    Joined: Mar 24, 2009
    Posts: 324

    Curly Hand
    Member
    from Tucson

    These combat photographers are made out of solid iron! Can you imagine being dropped into a war zone and the only thing you have to shoot is a camera? That takes some stones brother...
     
  9. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,936

    leon renaud
    Member
    from N.E. Ct.

    Japanese Americans born here didn't either! And Neither did Japan! Hawaii was a U.S. territory it did not become a state until 1959 and has never been a part of the U.S. "Mainland" When asked why they did not take advantage of their attack and follow up with direct assault of the Mainland U.S. the head of the Imperial Army replied"Because we know every other house in the U.S. has privately owned guns readily accessible to any citizen we knew we could not win a war fought on U.S. soil "
     
  10. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

    Hi leon, Thanks for answering, when I came to the US I had never heard of the interment camps and was really surprised at what the Gov. forced them to do.
    I have since met a few people who were in the camps, who lost businesses, homes and all their money in the bank.
    What I do know is that the German Nazi (National Socialist ) Party was very strong in the US with some big time supporters here.

    So, why were German-Americans not interned......
     
  11. Novadude55
    Joined: Nov 10, 2009
    Posts: 2,352

    Novadude55
    Member
    from CA

    Manufactured by Northrup Aircraft, El Segundo,
    my father was part of the QA on that bird.
    He retired in 86 after 35 yrs at Northrup
     
  12. rainhater1
    Joined: Oct 5, 2009
    Posts: 1,147

    rainhater1
    BANNED
    from az

    I am not saying that it was right, but I lived in El Segundo during the war and dad worked in the air ind. He told me that they had a Japanese couple next door tha was caught using a short wave radio and were picked up and never seen again. yes it was not a state but it was owned by the usa
     
  13. TiredIronGRB
    Joined: Feb 22, 2009
    Posts: 554

    TiredIronGRB
    Member

    They didn't attack Pearl Harbor...


    On another note my father joined the Navy on Dec 8, 1941.
     
  14. Jess87
    Joined: Aug 25, 2011
    Posts: 136

    Jess87
    Member





    Say, why don't you give credit to the original poster i.e creator ?? :mad:


    http://vintagegal.tumblr.com/




    .
     
  15. Ray Kroc sold malt machines until he had a bright idea.... thanks ray!
     
  16. fbi9c1
    Joined: Sep 29, 2010
    Posts: 1,265

    fbi9c1
    Member

    If you want an interesting take on the Ray Kroc/McDonald Bros. story, listen to Mark Knopfler's "Boom, Like That"
     

  17. Here's a little tip for those who seem to have trouble telling the difference between a diesel loco and a steamer; look at the drive wheels. Works every time.
     
  18. The infamous Japanese/American internment in operation. In a nutshell.
     
  19. 11E
    Joined: Jan 22, 2012
    Posts: 190

    11E
    Member
    from USA

    Because they generally had longer standing business and community relations here in German-American enclaves, were ethnically "less foreign" by appearance and culture, and unsullied by what was perceived as the more egregious behaviour of the "sneak attack' as attributed to those of Japanese descent. IOW, it was easier to demonize the Japanese Americans than the German ones based on Judeao-Christian values and other cultural characteristics.Poorly said, they were more easily idendtified and marginalized to less outcry based on the degree to which they'd been assimilated. Fair?, no. Understandable?, yes. Japanese-American's became the last iterations of native American peoples to be forced on to reservations in the interests of "national security." It was the greatest failure of the protections of the U.S. Constitution as applied to a single group in nearly one hundred years and one for which there is no justifiable reason under the law other than our own xenophobia. A very dark chapter in American history, indeed.
     
  20. spooky30a
    Joined: Jan 4, 2012
    Posts: 84

    spooky30a
    Member

    this is my favorite thread of all time out of all the forums I'm part of! it never gets lame and down played and there is always good stuff in hear


    good work!
    [​IMG]
     
  21. Bob W
    Joined: Sep 14, 2008
    Posts: 687

    Bob W
    Member
    from Here


    1956
     
  22. Bob W
    Joined: Sep 14, 2008
    Posts: 687

    Bob W
    Member
    from Here

     
  23. old rat
    Joined: Oct 22, 2009
    Posts: 87

    old rat
    Member

  24. Beach Bum
    Joined: May 7, 2006
    Posts: 573

    Beach Bum
    Member

    Your Dad probably knew my wife's Dad. He worked at Northrop for 39 years, retired on 1988. Started out in the Maintenance Dept and ended up the lead engineer for environmental control systems on the B2. One note, Northrop was based at Northrop Field, now Hawthorne Municipal Airport, in Hawthorne, Ca. That's where the flying wings were built. The current Northrop-Grumman facility in El Segundo was originally a Douglas facility in WW2. They built Dauntless dive bombers there.

    Kurt O.
     
  25. old rat
    Joined: Oct 22, 2009
    Posts: 87

    old rat
    Member

  26. old rat
    Joined: Oct 22, 2009
    Posts: 87

    old rat
    Member

  27. fbi9c1
    Joined: Sep 29, 2010
    Posts: 1,265

    fbi9c1
    Member

     
  28. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    -----------
    Probably none. The fact that the
    283 fuelie engine was listed as
    an "available option" doesn't
    necessarily mean that anyone
    actually ordered a car equipped
    that way. To further back up the
    hypothesis that no '58 Canadian
    Pontiacs were actually built with
    Rochester fuel injections units, I
    read somewhere on the net that
    someone obtained records from
    GM's Rochester Products Division
    that show no fuel injections units
    at all being shipped to Canada that
    year. If that's correct, then that
    also means that no Canadian-built
    Chevrolets came of the assembly
    line equipped with a 283 fuelie
    engine either - although in both
    cases, if someone had the bucks
    and had wanted one badly enough
    that year, it would have been
    possible to order a car with one.
    Likely though, the 500-plus-dollar
    cost of the fuel injection option
    - which was a LOT of money in
    1958 - especially on a car with
    a base price of about $2500 -
    scared any potential buyers off.

    Mart3406
    --------------
    P.S. *(Note to self - hurry up and
    finish time machine and go back
    to 1958 and order at least a dozen
    brand new 283hp/283 - 4 speed
    Pontiac Laurention hardtops and
    station wagons to bring back to
    2012 and list for sale on the
    H.A.M.B.!!!
    ):D:D
    :D
    =================
     
  29. bbdeuce
    Joined: Mar 4, 2007
    Posts: 14

    bbdeuce
    Member
    from GA

    We should have "interned" some folks after 9-11 but America's balls have withered!
     
  30. Deuce Daddy Don
    Joined: Apr 27, 2008
    Posts: 5,222

    Deuce Daddy Don
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    "Watched that one take off" from Northrop in Hawthorne,Ca.in 1947, they wern't sure of total distance needed for take off, so at end of runway(Crenshaw blvd.) they removed the chain link fence just in case!
    Both my parents worked at Northrop during WWII.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.