Register now to get rid of these ads!

Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. MrModelT
    Joined: Nov 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,723

    MrModelT
    Member

    This article is a great source of history. The date mentioned marks the SCTA's official formation in 1937, but need for an organized governing body to accurately manage timing and safety on the dry lakes goes back as early as 1935 if memory serves....and some of the earliest un-sanctioned runs go back as far as 1932 or 33.

    I have seen some "Gowjob" era cars in some of the very early photos....but this was more in the "Supejob" period for sure.
     
  2. Love the Hot Rod history! Thanks to all who posted.
     
  3. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Sorry, the paragraphing got lost when posting!

    Before I forget, I need to mention that a LOT of those early terms (even including hotrod) could be, and were, spelled and/or pronounced two or more ways. I thinks it's just because they were newly invented terms for new trends and situations.:rolleyes:

    Gow-job is one. :p If one source states that it's pronounced GO-job, there is another -- seriously -- that says other car guys would say GOW-job (rhyming with PLOW), stating that the term derived in some roundabout way from an old Chinese word regarding opium and its effects, SOMEhow being applied to these home- or small-garage-built cars. On superficial exam, sounds a tad far-fetched. But, I can honestly see the terms being pronounced, or used, different places, in different contexts. So, who the hell knows for sure?:eek:

    Another one is supe-job, sometimes used in the context of a "souped-up" car. I suppose that one is a little more obvious -- or, maybe, totally unrelated! LOL.:D

    So, where did the early guys come up with "hopped up"?:rolleyes:
     
  4. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

  5. MrModelT
    Joined: Nov 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,723

    MrModelT
    Member


    I believe it is pronounced "Gow" (rhyming with Plow). I know I have posted it wrong before...
     
  6. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

    [​IMG]

    Marlene Dietrich and Louis Armstrong in Las Vegas (1962)
     
  7. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

  8. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

  9. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

    [​IMG]

    The Ronettes ( LIVE ) - 1960s
     
  10. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

    [​IMG]

    train diesel ooops ......1940s
     
  11. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Since it's winter and the post flow is down, awaiting the West Coast shift, we are reduced to talking about CARS instead of Marilyn Monroe.:D LOL. So, before we leave the somewhat academic discussions around the early birth and evolution of what we now call hotrods, I'd like to share a few thoughtful and analytical paragraphs penned by our Capetown fellow HAMBer Ned Ludd (Dawie). He has obviously been a car freak, like us, all his life:cool:, though with a way better vocab than I ever developed! :p He doesn't claim to have all the answers, BUT his world perspective on speed and hotrodding are something special, IMHO. When I read this, I was impressed. Then, I started over, and I appreciated all of the nuance. BTW, Dawie posted this on my thread, "For Debate: When Did Hotrodding Take Root?(Hot Rods)" a couple of weeks back. If any regular feels this is OT, I'll just delete it.:rolleyes:

    See what you think.


    Allow me [ ] to throw in some ideas. I'm subscribing in the hope that some further debate ensues.

    The first is merely by way of introduction. The non-American perception of the hot rod phenomenon, arising out of a lack of familiarity with a continuous prior tradition, is of something that developed in the mid to late '60s. To that perception the archetypal hot rod is a T-bucket and, ironically to some minds, it is associated very much with '60s psychedelia. A lot of non-Americans first became aware of hot-rodding through music at the time, for instance due to the motoring choices of certain musicians. The resulting vision had a large element of humorous irony arising from what seemed a perversely eccentric decision to base a performance-modified car on a historic vehicle. To this day there is the idea that a hot rod ought to be garish, outlandish, and whimsical.

    Conversely, being aware of a continuous (if nebulous) tradition, the idea of a serious hot rod has never been problematic to American hot-rodders: which brings me to my second idea. This is a somewhat fine distinction to be drawn in how we propose to define hot-rodding. Do we consider the relationship of any given instance with a socially cohesive phenomenon, that is, do we define hot rodding in terms of continuity with a single historical growth? Or do we regard anything that possesses the essential properties of hot rodding, regardless of provenance, to be hot rodding? (assuming that we do not regard the aforementioned continuity to be an essential property of hot rodding). Both views have merit, and have been debated at greater length than one might imagine. It really comes down to how we understand the idea of linguistic meaning. Is it eidetic or discursive?

    My third idea does seem to support the idea of a cohesive growth, without denying the possibility (indeed the probability) of external inspiration. I should propose understanding hot rodding as a socio-political act of subversion, albeit an unself-conscious act. I should argue that hot rodding is at its root rebellious, and that its specifically American character arises firstly from an ongoing Jeffersonian tradition of challenging established concentration of power, and secondly to the unique character of the American motor industry compared to the motor industry in other parts of the world.

    World-wide, the early motor industry comprised primarily the large grey area between independent tinkerers at one end, and established manufacturers at the other. In this context the meaning of "hot rodding" is quite redundant. It is barely distinguishable from what the processes of manufacture are anyway (I would argue that this is how the motor industry ought to be today, but that is another discussion - see
    my blog).

    Beginning with Ford, the nature of the American industry began to change very early. The concomitant phenomenon that the automobile was always promoted in the USA as the primary means of mobility for the entire population should not be understood as a separate development, nor should too much be made of the existence in other countries of established systems of mobility, for they existed and functioned in at least some parts of the USA, too. The American automobile was thus oriented not to a knowledgeable minority of "car people" but specifically to a majority who didn't really care one way or another. The upshot is that, by the era we consider the nascent phase of hot rodding, American motor manufacturers were becoming fewer in number and more powerful in market reach and technical ability.

    The abovementioned "grey middle" survived much longer in Europe, which is why the term "factory" as an adjective describing specifications approaches meaninglessness in the case of many European manufacturers even after World War II. The "factory" was really not so far removed from someone's garage; it was not a different world like the American factory.

    It was not, of course, thought through in quite these terms, but I believe that the origin of hot rodding as a cohesive historical phenomenon lies in an impulse to reclaim automotive technology from an increasingly aloof, impregnable, and essentially hostile motor industry. It must be added that this hostility was always largely subliminal, and industry has gone to great lengths to keep it from becoming patent and overt. Hence our typical mixed feelings about the factory.

    Therefore, I should say that hot rodding is a specific, cohesive growth because it is a specific, cohesive response to a specific, cohesive political/economic/industrial situation. In this sense the mere act of modifying something to improve its performance does not suffice. Similar phenomena, like European sport specials, are separate but parallel developments: though I do not believe the separation is complete. There is enough evidence at least reasonably to conjecture that there was mutual inspiration - and more of it acting westwards than eastwards (though today the opposite might be true).
    <!-- / message --><!-- sig -->__________________
    Dawie
     
  12. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
    Member

  13. Deuce Daddy Don
    Joined: Apr 27, 2008
    Posts: 5,428

    Deuce Daddy Don
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    My mom called this a "BUG" written on the back of pix 1929.

    I think "hopped up" term was initiated just after WWII when I was in hi school, I heard the term around the guys that were milling heads,porting & relieving blocks,grinding cams & welding cranks.---Don
     
  14. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Yo, Don! Is that, maybe one of the "Mercury" bodies that were marketed for the Ford Ts? Kinda puts me in mind of it.

    HUGE thanks for the last paragraph about the term "hopping up" a car. If we don't get the first-hand info down from guys who actually lived it, then all that will be left for future gens will be speculation and just plain WAGs.

    So, THANKS again, HAMB bro!
     
  15. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [​IMG]

    May 1933. Marlene Dietrich, at age 31, never made any pretense about her bisexuality.
    Film audiences disregarded that and made her a superstar in her early career. She was
    a staunch anti-Nazi and left Germany to become a U.S. citizen, in 1937. Photo thanks
    to Wikipedia and the German Federal Archive, to both of whom I am grateful.

    [​IMG]

    Marlene Dietrich with Bobby Seesock 3rd Signal Co Photographer.
    Like Joe E. Brown, committed Dietrich entertained Allied troops in
    forward positions, not just in the rear echelon.
     
    Pauljrestomod97 likes this.
  16. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member


    [​IMG]

    Artful to a tee. From a compositional standpoint, this has to be one of the best
    publicity photos of Dietrich, showing the real feminine side she didn't usually
    give a hoot if anybody saw, or not! Thank you, ListAl for this photo.

    [​IMG]

    Nice gam, but the accordion spoils it for me! Keen Marlene
    photo thanks to FanPix!
     
    Pauljrestomod97 likes this.
  17. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member



    [​IMG]
    Thanks to HollywoodMemorabilia, gunless Sheriff Destry
    tangles with a not-so-defenseless Frenchie in "Destry Rides
    Again." Stewart and Dietrich obviously knew how to have
    fun on camera, though Wikipedia says they kept some off-
    duty company, as well.



    [​IMG]

    Madeline Kahn having a field day ripping off Marlene Dietrich's "Blue Angel" and her
    own self-parody in "Destry Rides Again," 1939 ("See What the Boys in the Backroom Will
    Have") character in Mel's Brooks' spoof, "Blazing Saddles," 1974. Big thanks to Flixter!
    BTW, Kahn's take was "I'm SO Tired!"

    "Come on in, shewiff! Woosen up your buwetts!" LOL :D
     
  18. I love this! "always coming and going and going and coming, and always too soon!" LMAO :D
     
  19. 731132
    Joined: Oct 21, 2009
    Posts: 937

    731132
    Member
    from Sweden

    Not new, but used ones are easy and cheap to find and buy, at least here in Scandinavia. The car is a 1961-64 Ford Taunus 17m, body model P3.
     
  20. Another term that was heard over and over was "full blown" . I won't pretend to know the origin of the term but I will offer my idea. I don't think it referred to superchargers as some have suggested, but instead is a take-off on a nautical term describing the sails in a stiff wind.
     
  21. fulmacett
    Joined: Apr 22, 2009
    Posts: 3

    fulmacett
    Member

    Nice pics, great tour.
    Canada A
     
  22. automaticslim
    Joined: Aug 31, 2010
    Posts: 367

    automaticslim
    Member
    from new jersey

    Being backed here by the Allentown, Pa band "The Cyrkle." This must have been during the Beatles 1966 US tour. The Cyrkle was one of the opening acts on that tour, and probably provided back up for the Ronettes. The Cyrcle had hit records with 'Turn Down Day,' and 'Red Rubber Ball.'
     
  23. WCD
    Joined: Apr 15, 2008
    Posts: 1,712

    WCD
    Member

    Didnt the Ronettes incorporate a lot of the Phil Spector "Wall of sound" technique in their music?
     
  24. Bellytanker
    Joined: Aug 18, 2007
    Posts: 126

    Bellytanker
    Member
    from California

    I raced GoKarts there in 1958 and it was paved at that time. I've been trying to remember who I saw Pombo go after with a LARGE crescent wrench in the pits one Sunday afternoon. (Effin' old brain!!!) Clovis was the local 1/2 mile dirt track.
     
  25. lordairgtar
    Joined: Oct 11, 2009
    Posts: 416

    lordairgtar
    Member

    Yes. Ronnie was married to Phil.
     
  26. Tenney
    Joined: Jan 14, 2010
    Posts: 10

    Tenney
    Member

    Schumacher!
     
  27. Novadude55
    Joined: Nov 10, 2009
    Posts: 2,352

    Novadude55
    Member
    from CA

    phil was one smart dude when it came to music,
    something went wrong along the way tho
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.