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Vintage Chilton's scans

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by aceuh, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. aceuh
    Joined: Apr 17, 2008
    Posts: 1,360

    aceuh
    Member

    My brother and I found an old Chilton's manual while we were cleaning out my dads old shop building. Didn't know if we'd ever use it or not, but we knew it wasn't going to get thrown out. In a recent fit of desperation while trying to get my 64 Impala to run we broke out the Chilton manual. I was overwhelmed by the amount of info contained in these pages. The manual covers ALL U.S. made cars from 64-71 and is about 3.5" thick.

    I went through it yesterday and scanned a few images I thought were cool. You just don't see things like this in manuals when you drop in at the local parts stores these days.

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  2. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 2,167

    RodStRace
    Member

    Here are some reasons that the look has changed.

    The amount of info these days in the OE manuals, TSBs and diagnostics is huge. I don't have exact figures, but an example is that just service manuals for GM vehicles for one year can cover 20+ feet of shelf space.
    There are ~26 manufacturers now to cover.
    You could cover a small block Chevy for 60-70 in two dozen pages, including ID codes. You can't do that for Chevy V8s for 2000-10. The procedure to fit the LS front cover and rear oil seal (the areas that the oil pan bolts to) now requires half a dozen special tools and procedures, for example.
    All of those great graphics were provided by the OE (notice the copyrights?), and they don't use half tone photos anymore. They have all gone to line drawings as the standard, they are cheaper and smaller size files.
    As with any business, they have to do more with less. I have a 1946-50 Chilton's Motor Age Body and Frame manual. Great book, lot's of cool graphics, including body style ID for all the covered models. There are 5 asst. editors one editor and a managing editor. 6 total. 136 pages. They probably published less than a dozen different titles a year.
    I also have the 2008 Chilton Asian Service manual Vol. II of 4 (Hyundai, Infiniti, Kia and Nissan). A LOT of very good OE graphics. 11 editors one mangaing editor. 12 total. Easily 10 times the page count. They have 4 Asian, 2 each for Ford, Chrysler and GM, a European manual, (11 so far) plus all the labor guides, Diagnostics, Electronic Repair, and other titles.
    The Chilton website has double to triple the amount in the book for the same vehicle in most cases.
    Mitchell and Alldata don't even publish books, they only have electronic (web or DVD) files.

    That's why it's important to get a good service manual for your old car. This stuff is valuable, and while there is a lot of info on the web including the old car manual project, a lot of this stuff isn't just out there to grab whenever you get it. A lot of the questions posted here can be answered with those great old manuals.
    I even scanned and posted the Mopar frame data from that first book here:
    http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=5304940&an=0&page=4#Post5304940
    but that doesn't help the Buick or Stude guy.

    BTW, if you can scan in the old stuff and pass it along to the old car manual project
    http://www.tocmp.com/ they would probably appreciate it.
    Guess anyone looking at my profile has a pretty good idea what I do now...;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2009
  3. Insane 1
    Joined: Feb 13, 2005
    Posts: 973

    Insane 1
    Member
    from Ennis TX

    1'st time ever seeing a Chilton's?? Nothing wrong w/that just thought everyone has used one, their pretty common.

    I would suggest also getting a Motors manual, seem to have more info and better detail than a Chilton's.
     
  4. I buy every Chilton,Hollander,Motor manual I find. The half decently priced ones that is....a wealth of knowledge when I need it.Sometimes it,s actually faster to look it up in a manual as opposed to surfing through a thousand websites trying to sell you shit.
     
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  5. aceuh
    Joined: Apr 17, 2008
    Posts: 1,360

    aceuh
    Member

    Not my first time seeing a Chilton's...But it the frst time I've ever used one that was this old. I've also got a motor manual of the same vintage as well as a couple of Hollander books. We saved any and all reference material we found while we were cleaning out the shop.

    Getting that fat book in the scanner was quite a feat! I couldn't quite get it flat enough to scan like it should.
     
  6. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 42,754

    squirrel
    Member

    huh, I've been using that book for over 30 years.
     
  7. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 17,218

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    old manuals have all sorts of cool illustrations. I have several Chevrolet Master Parts Catalogs. I think the earliest is 1929 to 1942, I'm pretty sure the widest range starting in 1929 goes up to 1958. I also have a 1938 to 1963.

    these are great for identifying parts and seeing which part fits what range of years.

    I like the exploded views. like the Hemi you showed.
     
  8. FoMoCoPower
    Joined: Feb 2, 2007
    Posts: 2,490

    FoMoCoPower
    Member

    I think I have enough to cover me from about 1920-1990
     
  9. Swifster
    Joined: Dec 16, 2006
    Posts: 1,449

    Swifster
    Member

    Being in the insurance end, I look more at the collision and body manuals. That is especially true if they have labor times. My collection includes many Motors Manuals and Chilton guides going back to the teens. I have most, if not all of the estimating guides made by Mitchell going back to when they started in the '50's, including foreign cars. I keep looking for older body and frame guides when I can find them.
     
  10. aceuh
    Joined: Apr 17, 2008
    Posts: 1,360

    aceuh
    Member

    We also found a book that is a "how to" for bodywork. It has some series of photos showing several crashed cars being repaired that probably should have been totaled.

    I'll try to drag it out and do a coupe scans.
     
  11. Soreback
    Joined: Nov 25, 2007
    Posts: 223

    Soreback
    Member

    My dad bought his automotive machine shop in the 80's he worked for the original owner when he was a teenager went to Korea got out in 52 went back to work at the machine shop. He has so much of this stuff going back to the teens some of the early repair manuals were like a paperback book. I used to sit and thumb through them for hours. I get a kick out of the flat rate manuals too. Windshield replacement was like $6.80 including the glass in 1949. Man I have a lot of memories having one of those manuals sitting on the fender and me bent over on my knees teetering a radiator.
     

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