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History Vintage Bonneville car pictures

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dean Lowe, Aug 16, 2008.

  1. Smokey2
    Joined: Jan 11, 2011
    Posts: 920

    Smokey2
    Member

    Awesome don't come close,
    So much History on The SALT.............Thanks to all who posted on this Thread.........Great !!
    Great !
    Great!
    :cool:
    :cool:
    :cool:
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  2. gyronaut
    Joined: Dec 16, 2010
    Posts: 197

    gyronaut
    Member

    And the pieces keep falling into place (thanks, again!). It sure helps to know who/what to look for. Here's the press release for the McGrath/Lufkin engine reunited again with the engine photo after 40ish years...

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  3. drofrockology
    Joined: Sep 17, 2008
    Posts: 238

    drofrockology
    Member
    from Reno, NV

    this was about a year before i got to know jack.

    he never spoke to me of bob driving his car... even after lattin bought the redhead.

    i love being educated!
     
  4. I thought I knew all the drivers who drove Lufkin's car. I did not know Mc Grath drove it. You learn something new everyday!
     
  5. Photos of jet cars may not be as exciting as piston engine cars, but these pictures of the Spirit of America were too good to pass on ..............


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  6. Continued .........

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    Hmmmm .... there are always skeptics.
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  7. gyronaut
    Joined: Dec 16, 2010
    Posts: 197

    gyronaut
    Member

    I seem to keep learning new connections every day, as well.

    So then just to wrap up a few more loose ends on the McGrath-Lufkin connection, here's some more: The engine's press release says that the McGrath runs in Lufkin's modified sports car were part of a test program for the Olympian's attempt at the ultimate piston-powered record then held by Goldenrod. So here's a couple press releases on the Olympian from the end of 1969 and early 1970:

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    And Bob McGrath at Alex Tremulis' house with the scale model of the Olympian:

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    If Alex did indeed work on streamlining the canopy design for Lufkin's sports car, I'm sure he had a few suggestions for the Olympian as well. And this all finally makes sense, only because of you guys filling in the blanks...

    So what ever happened to the Olympian effort???
     
  8. gyronaut
    Joined: Dec 16, 2010
    Posts: 197

    gyronaut
    Member

    There are actually two different Immerso streamliners shown in the photos. One is the original Thunderbird from the 1960's and '70's (I'm not so sure where this one is - but in Googling, it looks like the body at least has been found) and the other is the Thunderbird II from the 1980's (at the Fergusons). I've got a few pics of both.

    Here's the Thunderbird II as it was in 1983. I'll try some better scans of it, but for now...

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  9. rick finch
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 2,003

    rick finch
    Member

    ....pretty much sums up my attitude about the jet car efforts.

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  10. rick finch
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 2,003

    rick finch
    Member

    Back to our regularly scheduled program....

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  11. There was a car referred to as the "streetliner" that had an injected Hemi in it. Ran in 1961 I believe. It looked more like a sports racer (i.e. Scarab or Cunningham) than a hot rod. Absolutely GORGEOUS design. I've seen a picture of it being worked on at a Wendover hotel, but no pics or info on how it did on the salt. Anyone remember it?
     
  12. squigy
    Joined: Nov 30, 2003
    Posts: 3,915

    squigy
    Member
    from SO.FLO.

    correct me if i am wrong but that is a twin turbo charged motor isnt it?
    anyways that is bad ass.
     

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  13. drofrockology
    Joined: Sep 17, 2008
    Posts: 238

    drofrockology
    Member
    from Reno, NV

    it is, indeed.
     
  14. That's a "Kodak Moment", of a lifetime! Thanks for the good laugh Mr Finch.

    D. Finch
     
  15. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,831

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    MacAbee Sports Racing car from Texas as I remember Streetliner
     
  16. rick finch
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 2,003

    rick finch
    Member

    I stole that from Toby he posted it first, but it really is funny.:D
     
  17. Justin B
    Joined: Oct 11, 2003
    Posts: 2,188

    Justin B
    Member

  18. That's Big Stan Johnson in the pith helmet. Stan passed away a few months ago. RIP old friend.



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  19. gyronaut
    Joined: Dec 16, 2010
    Posts: 197

    gyronaut
    Member

    Ab Jenkins' Duesenberg Special at speed...

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    ...and here's a first-hand account of what is was like to take a road trip with Ab Jenkins behind the wheel. This was written for the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club newsletter many, many years ago.

    Operation Ash Tray

    by Alex Tremulis

    Bert McInnis called me down to his office and told me that he didn't like any of the ashtrays we
    had for the custom Berline that we were going to show at the 1937 auto show. He said that there
    were 3 sources and that I should visit Chicago, Grand Rapids and Detroit and buy whatever
    looked good. I told Bert that Augie and I were in the midst of a crash program building the 3 supercharged
    show cars for the New York show and that such a trip would take at least 2 or 3 days.
    Well don't worry about the supercharged jobs as we are not committed to them and probably
    won't finish them in time anyway and that the Berline show car was a must. As far as time, he had
    talked to Ab Jenkins who would chauffeur me and that we could get the job done in one day. Ab
    chose a stock Cord for the trip.

    All told, I have ridden with Ab for at least 8 to 10 thousand miles, 6 to 7 hundred miles at the Indianapolis
    Speedway. I've ridden at least 150 miles in which we blew out 8 or 9 tires with dynamite
    caps at speeds of 100 to 110 MPH and get this - on narrow 2 lane highways without ever putting
    the tires off the pavement. At this time Ab had driven over one million miles without an accident.
    Ab told me it was safer to be going 90 MPH under the right conditions than 9 MPH under the
    wrong conditions.

    In the next 20 hours we were to cover 1005 miles, visit four major cities looking and buying ashtrays,
    at least 6 stops for fuel, three quick meals on the road at nice restaurants and maybe 2 coffee
    breaks. Add a 10 minute stop for a left rear tire that started throwing rubber at 100 and then
    blew itself apart at about 90. One complete light failure and a 15 minute pit stop to repair the shifting
    linkage which had come apart.

    I have in my career ridden with some of the world's greatest race car drivers. I really don't know
    how Ab would have fared as a race car driver in competition but this I do know - there has never
    been a driver on the road that could cope with any emergency condition with Ab's precise skill. His
    judgement in passing slower cars with oncoming traffic on two lane roads could only be equaled
    with a sophisticated computerized space age guidance system. His reflexes were utterly instantaneous.
    He was a part of the dynamics of any wheeled machine that he ever drove - be it the 65
    MPH Allis Chalmers tractor he drove to a world's record as well as the mighty Mormon Meteor
    whose long distance accomplishments are still legendary.

    We had left Connorsville at 3 o'clock in the morning. At about 3:30 that morning it happened.
    Imagine the setting - a dark night, no moon in sight with only stars hanging from the heavens (B.
    S. - before smog). Outside of Richmond on a three lane highway Ab had gone, into a nice long
    sweeping curve at 90 when all of a sudden our headlights and instrument lights went out. Absolute
    black, black, blackness. He started slowing gently. At about 85 I struck a match at least to light up
    the interior. "Blow it out I can't see". The guy must be nuts, everything is jet black. Why doesn't he
    at least slam on the brakes. It's better to get killed at 40 instead of 85. Well I guess there is nothing
    to do except start singing I'm Coming Home to Jesus. 70 - 60 - 50 - 40 and we are still on the
    road. At 10 he said he was going off the road. Our right wheels went Katunk, Katunk and then the
    left wheels went Katunk, Katunk and we safely stopped on the soft shoulder.
    Ab said let me have your cigarettes. Well la de da - the great Mormon had finally broken down
    and in terror was going to smoke his first cigarette. He just simply had to be as terrified as I was.
    As I lit matches he tore out a piece of silver foil from the cigarette package, pulled out the offending
    fuse and wrapped it in foil and Voila, our lights went on again. As we accelerated away I asked
    Ab, how on earth did you see where we were going? Very simple, Alex, celestial navigation. See
    that bright star - it just happened that as the lights went out it was lined up perfectly with the
    straight-away. Here, I'll show you – he flicked off the lights again at 75 to 80 and started counting
    to 10. It was the longest 10 count ever. Everyone should know how to do this - it just might save
    your life some dark night. However he cautioned start out at 50 and then work up to where you
    know what you're doing. This was my first exposure as to the great man's capabilities under emergency
    conditions.

    As dawn broke a couple of hours later he said: "Alex, one of these days you are going to hit a train
    at a crossing in the country. Don't worry about the locomotive - nine times out of ten it will be a
    string of box cars. If you get panicky and run into them you have had it. (1) The thing to do is
    relax, assuming that you are going too fast to stop. (2) Determine the direction the box cars are
    flying by. (3) Slam on the brakes and lock up all four wheels and keep them locked up and gently
    turn your wheels in the direction of the flying box cars, as long as you are locked up you will be
    sliding in a straight line. (4) At about 2 car lengths, or about 35 feet, release your brakes - the front
    wheels will grab and the rear end will beautifully ricochet off the box cars instead of under the
    wheels. It will bend up the car's rear end a bit but you will be able to tell your grandchildren about
    it".

    On our 15 minute pit stop we had just passed a line of cars in that gorgeous 3:88 third gear. What
    a passing gear - one more car to pass and it would be smooth sailing. Ab had pre-selected fourth
    gear and as he hit the clutch the shifting pin let go and we stayed in neutral as we passed our car
    on the wings of momentum. Imagine our embarrassment having to coast to a stop, holding down
    to a snail's pace all the traffic that we had just passed. You know the ritual - remove the front
    bumper so that you can remove the differential cover. Ab took a pair of pliers and went to a fence,
    removed a long rusty nail and we were off again.

    Ab always said he liked round numbers and that is why he always cruised the Cords at 100 MPH.
    Point A to point B, no matter how many little towns there were, always meant a 75 MPH average.
    In town Ab would always respect the speed laws. The milk run - Connersville to Auburn - that
    meant going through Fort Wayne, was always two hours flat. Three hundred miles was always 4
    hours flat unless you encountered a big city like Toledo, Ohio. He drove every bit of that 1005
    miles that day. I enjoyed the trip immensely, having had several cat naps. The hypnotic effect of
    looking at a needle stuck at 100 MPH, hours on end, just simply put you to sleep no matter what
    the road surface was.
    About an hour out of Connersville the eyes of the eagle showed their first signs of strain after 19
    hrs. Ab suddenly slammed on his brakes as we approached a well lit bridge. As he released his
    brakes I asked Ab what happened. He said he thought it was a truck - it was just like the mirages
    at Bonneville. That's another story I'll tell you about at a later date.

    Well we got home at 11:00 sharp that night, a motoring experience that I shall never forget or ever
    see equaled. We had encountered two hours of rain and snow and about 15 minutes of sleet in
    Toledo.
    About operation ash tray - well I had purchased about a dozen of them. The next morning they all
    looked horrible to me, they were all too ornate. I went to the Auburn parts bin, picked out a few
    stock Auburn ash trays, had them sand blasted, painted them Desert Sand and on the Berline
    show car they looked just beautiful.

    My regards to all Auburn, Cord and Duesenbergers.

    Alex Tremulis.
     
  20. I can't remember if this one has been posted before (i couldn't find where it was).
    Chrisman Roadster & Coupe

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    Last edited: Oct 18, 2011
  21. neverdun
    Joined: Oct 17, 2007
    Posts: 667

    neverdun
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    1. Maryland HAMBers

    Great story.
    Thanks
     
  22. gyronaut
    Joined: Dec 16, 2010
    Posts: 197

    gyronaut
    Member

    Here's a couple more 1965 vs 2011 of Goldenrod's hangar:

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  23. I thought this was a cool photo that some of you might like to see.

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  24. Still_Crazy
    Joined: Sep 30, 2011
    Posts: 351

    Still_Crazy
    Member
    from . .

  25. Still_Crazy
    Joined: Sep 30, 2011
    Posts: 351

    Still_Crazy
    Member
    from . .

  26. Still_Crazy
    Joined: Sep 30, 2011
    Posts: 351

    Still_Crazy
    Member
    from . .

  27. scootermcrad
    Joined: Sep 20, 2005
    Posts: 12,304

    scootermcrad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This is such a bad ass thread!
     
  28. Cub8556
    Joined: May 22, 2011
    Posts: 146

    Cub8556
    Member

    Instead of making a new thread thought I would post here. Anyone have pictures of any interesting cars that pull the Bonneville hot rods? I know most are normal everyday 4 doors, but I figured a few guys had hand painted cars to match their Bonneville rods.
     
  29. drofrockology
    Joined: Sep 17, 2008
    Posts: 238

    drofrockology
    Member
    from Reno, NV

    please, start a new thread!

    i'm so tired of magazines that claim bonneville coverage on the cover and when you open it, 2/3 of the pics are cars that came for the cruise-in.
     

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