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vintage 235 chevy speed equipment

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by hotrodlolita, May 29, 2008.

  1. Road Runner
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,257

    Road Runner
    Member

    2x 216 carbs for a street/freeway 235/261, especially with dual exhaust headers.

    2x 235 carbs for engines with a bigger cam and above 3500 rpm.
    3x 216 would be even better in that case.
     
  2. 6narow
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 518

    6narow
    Member

    Road Runner,

    Your '48 is a true piece of art.
    Congrats on owning such a sweet little ride.
    Who's cam is in the 261, or was that ground by a local shop?
    All I saw stated was that it was 254 duration.
    Love the covers on that engine, too.



    6narow
     
  3. Road Runner
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,257

    Road Runner
    Member

    Thanks - It was a dream of many years, I finally realized a couple of years ago. - The only car I ever owned.
    Chevy with Fisher bodies made some beautiful and very functional and long lasting cars and engines back in the day.
    I merely restored it all to new with some power upgrades and really enjoy driving it almost every day and what was once standard and available to everyday folks from their local dealerships. Times sure have changed after the last big war. There is just something special about pre-war cars. And to me the 42-48 chevs are like the best in tech and design from that time, before things started to change forever.

    Delta cams in WA has reground my original 261 cam with more lift and duration. It's their RV cam grind.
    I really like their cam grind patterns, which are quiet different from the vintage type grinds that had asymmetrical duration for intake and exhaust and a lot of overlap, giving good HP at high rpm, but less torque than the stock cam for the street.
    Delta 254 adv. dur. grind is symmetrical with very little overlap, giving higher than stock torque up to 3000 rpm, yet still has good HP at higher rpm.
    They also have a slightly asymmetrical 254/264 grind with even less overlap, which adds another 5 HP at high rpm. It's their popular 'Bullldog' grind, also distributed by Patrick's and Tom Langdon.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2009
  4. 6narow
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 518

    6narow
    Member

    Thanks for the additional insight into your car, Road Runner, and you're right, fat fenders are definately where its "at".

    ...and talk about a small world!

    I don't know if you noticed, but I live in Washington and am quite familiar with Delta Cams.
    Heck, I remember when they called themselves "Pacific Cam"!
    All of the parts houses around here get their "regrinds" from Delta, and I had to replace the cam in my Mazda, when I rebuilt the engine back in '95, so I run a Delta regrind, too.
    Good to know their reputation extends past the border.



    6narow
     
  5. MFRANCOIII
    Joined: Jun 11, 2009
    Posts: 5

    MFRANCOIII
    Member

    Im installing a 60-61 235 trk engine into my '51 chevy fleetline, and was wondering if anybody knew where i can get side engine mounts to adapt it to my car?
     
  6. Camm
    Joined: Sep 22, 2005
    Posts: 592

    Camm
    Member

    I'm looking at a 1950 Chevy with a 235 and a powerglide. The motor has duel carbs and split Fenton exhaust. Will i be able to cruise down the California freeways at a good speed with this set up? I know the motor is babbit bearings. Thanks
     
  7. Camm
    Joined: Sep 22, 2005
    Posts: 592

    Camm
    Member

    No body ??
     
  8. jcmarz
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 4,633

    jcmarz
    Member
    from Chino, Ca

    Since you are a lady in distress, I may as well jump on the band wagon with all these other guys and rush to your aide! There are two reproduced books from the 50s by California Bill that talks about hopping up chevy 216/235. There is a lot of info about "then" new speed equipment and how to hopup those motors. There is a photo in one book of a fuel injection unit for the 216/235.
    You can find the book at the car and truck shop of orange. Or maybe Chevs of the 40s or Brothers chevy trucks. Break a leg
     
    inliner54 likes this.
  9. Cosmo49
    Joined: Jan 15, 2007
    Posts: 1,231

    Cosmo49
    Member




    Go to the inline motors social group here on the HAMB.
     
  10. 6narow
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 518

    6narow
    Member

    Camm,

    One reason why no one's ventured a guess could be because you haven't given us enough information to determine an answer.

    If the engine has a stock idle (or close to it), then try this...

    Measure the height of the rear tires, then get a calculator and input that measurement into this formula...

    2000 / 1.065 * height of the tire / 336 / 65 =

    The number you end up with will be the rear axle ratio you'll need to be using, in order to cruise a car with an automatic transmission on the freeway at 65mph, with the engine only turning about 2000 rpm (which is a nice cruising rpm for this motor).


    6narow
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2015
  11. MistGreen50
    Joined: Dec 29, 2005
    Posts: 228

    MistGreen50
    Member
    from Belen,NM

    Still running like a top 3 years later.......
     
  12. 'Mo
    Joined: Sep 26, 2007
    Posts: 7,432

    'Mo
    Member

    Thomas Hi-Lift Mag Rockers:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2011
  13. 6narow
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 518

    6narow
    Member

    MistGreen50,

    That's a really sweet motor you've got there. I'm sure the rest of the car is no less remarkable.
    Thanks for sharing that one with us...again. ;)


    6narow
     
  14. 'Mo
    Joined: Sep 26, 2007
    Posts: 7,432

    'Mo
    Member

    Jahn's 8 1/2:1 pop-ups.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
  15. terryble
    Joined: Sep 25, 2008
    Posts: 541

    terryble
    Member
    from canada

    Truth be told even later 235/261 engines are not really full pressure, they have pressure to rods and mains but still use a sort of bypass system to the filter that reduces pressure. USA 261 motors after about 1958 are true full pressure engines.
    The early 235/261 motors are easily converted and should be if/when you are doing a rebuild.
     
  16. 6narow
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 518

    6narow
    Member

    Terry,

    Don't mean to rain on your parade, but I think you've confused a couple of terms.
    I cannot recall ever hearing or reading the term "Full-Pressure" before, but a "High Pressure" system is an oiling system where the oil is channeled through a series of passages, straight from the oil pump, through the entire engine.
    On the older "Low Pressure" systems, the oil went from the pump to a series a nozzles that lined up with scoops that were part of the rod caps.
    The actual pressure of the oil in these older systems was much lower than in the more modern "High Pressure" system.
    However, the type of oil filter used, or how it receives the oil, does not determine whether its a high or low pressure system.
    It would, however, determine if the system was By-Pass, or, FULL FLOW.
    You've already described a by-pass system. The difference with a Full Flow system is that the oil goes from the pan, through the pump and directly into the filter, before making its journey through the rest of the engine.
    In this way, ALL of the oil is filtered before it sees any moving parts.
    On a by-pass system, some of the oil sees some of the moviing parts, before it sees the filter.
    If your engine had no other provision for filtering the oil during operation, then the by-pass system is a nice stop-gap, as some filtering does occur.
    However, it is inferior to the full flow system, and why all modern engines have used the full flow system for many years now, as standard equipment.
    I remember my father built a very nice little by-pass oil filtering system for his VW Beetle back in the 1970's.
    Later on, when I had a Bug, Dad rigged up a similar system for my engine.
    He used an FL-1 for the filter (truth be told, it was usually a NAPA 1515) and it worked pretty good.
    Can't remember now where he picked the oil up from, but I remember it drained back into the base of the generator tower, which is also the breather for the crankcase on those Type 1's.



    6narow
     
  17. 'Mo
    Joined: Sep 26, 2007
    Posts: 7,432

    'Mo
    Member

    McGurk cam (early, small journal):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
  18. 6narow
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 518

    6narow
    Member

    Very cool pics you guys are posting, but I just had to run that address (13226 Halldale Avenue Gardena, CA 90249-2202).

    Nowadays, that is the home of Trend Tooling.
    They're basically a tool and die manufacturer.
    If you think they can help you, their number is listed as (310) 323-4162.



    6narow
     
  19. Mr Nilsson
    Joined: Apr 10, 2008
    Posts: 104

    Mr Nilsson
    Member
    from Sweden

    Lifting an old thread here...

    Got a 235 standing in a corner of my workshop for a while now and removed the head today, the block is cracked and I thought I would remove what´s worth saving and scrap the remains.
    Got quite a surprise when I saw the combustion chambers!
    Homemade high-comp head...

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  20. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 10,003

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Milled and filled they used to call that.
     
  21. I've got a Hotrod chevy 1931 Sedan with a 235 from -56 and three on the floor and now it's time to hop up the engine. I've got a Howard intake (modified to fit Chevy235) made for 5 carbs but I'm runnin 3 Holley 94's and homemade headers on it. I want a cam that sounds rough at idle and revs good but still got torque at lower revs. I'm thinking of goin with a Bulldog camshaft from Langdons stovebolt.com? Anyone got any experience with a bulldog?
     
  22. JT Apperson
    Joined: Jul 12, 2010
    Posts: 215

    JT Apperson
    Member
    from va

    I'm planning on replacing my 235 in my 56 chevy 210 with a 292. What will I need to do with the motor mounts? Willl a chevy V-8 starter work? Thanks for the help........JT
     
  23. 6narow
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 518

    6narow
    Member

    A small block starter uses two bolts mounted vertically.
    A Nova 6 uses a 3 bolt starter whose bolts mount horizontally.
    The 292 will need the 235's flywheel ring and the front "feet".
    I've heard of this being done before and its always sounded to me like a fairly straight ahead bolt in affair.
    What tranny are you going to use with it? (might be a good excuse for an upgrade in that department)



    6narow
     
  24. JT Apperson
    Joined: Jul 12, 2010
    Posts: 215

    JT Apperson
    Member
    from va

    6narow.......I plan on running a T10 out of a 61 corvette. I've bought the Clifford Intake to run a Holley 4 barrel. I will probably go with Clifford shorty headers. Go out and have fun. Can you tell me what linkage to use w/the holley....Thanks JT
     
  25. 6narow
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 518

    6narow
    Member

    Nope. Sorry, I can't.
     

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