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Update on the making of a cylinder head

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by George Miller, Aug 10, 2010.

  1. kookee
    Joined: Jan 19, 2008
    Posts: 526

    kookee
    Member

    Hats off to you sir. Takes some talent and courage. Keep going and I will keep being amazed!
     
  2. George Miller
    Joined: Dec 26, 2008
    Posts: 413

    George Miller
    Member
    from NC usa

    The cam is from Bill Stipe I think he called it a 320.
     
  3. George Miller
    Joined: Dec 26, 2008
    Posts: 413

    George Miller
    Member
    from NC usa

    I will post the finished head, and one when it is on the engine, with its home made intake and headers.
     
  4. George Miller
    Joined: Dec 26, 2008
    Posts: 413

    George Miller
    Member
    from NC usa

    I have been planing in my mind for a long time. Even when you plan you run into things you over looked. This head with all the water pockets and ports, you really have to go slow so you do not mess up. I do not like putting metal back in. I never made much scrap and I do not want to start now.
     
  5. Ultra cool stuff! Nice work without a DRO, I still do it now and then using the dials. My first job in a shop I went to in 1981 was on an old Van Norman universal mill and the dials were .250, not the usual .200, so counting cranks of the handle was dicey. The buggers did it to me on purpose to see if i could do it.

    Lots of set up there, indicator and edge finder work as well, all forgotten and underappreciated skills, you the man! But its your dojo and you have complete control and no inspector to deal with. In the end, if it works, it works.

    Are you doing any of the design on CAD? That has to be a 150-190 chunk of aluminum you started with, no pressure, no pressure...

    Bob
     
  6. George Miller
    Joined: Dec 26, 2008
    Posts: 413

    George Miller
    Member
    from NC usa

    Here are picture of O ring grooves for head bolts and push rod holes.
    Also for you CNC guys a picture how we put on radius in the old days.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Really coming along. Thanks for the updates!
     
  8. Chuck Most
    Joined: May 8, 2009
    Posts: 175

    Chuck Most
    Member
    from Saskatoon

    Looking better all the time!
     
  9. I know what you're saying George, I started in shops in 1958, countin' turns, dividing heads, rotary tables, turret lathes, all the old way. I got soft tho', got a read out on my B'port now. scrapiron in Virginny
    I did get some MOOG time back about '65,,,,
     
  10. PeteFromTexas
    Joined: Apr 4, 2007
    Posts: 3,837

    PeteFromTexas
    Member

    Looking good! we have a machine like that at work. Gives me a lot of ideas...
     
  11. crapshoot
    Joined: Apr 25, 2005
    Posts: 690

    crapshoot
    Member

    This is rad. I wish i had a mill or even knew how to use one
     
  12. rschilp
    Joined: Sep 17, 2009
    Posts: 677

    rschilp
    Member

    Man I just bought my first mill, very excited to start using it, and this thread just makes me more excited.. although I know I probably won't ever get as good at manual milling as you are.
     
  13. fab32
    Joined: May 14, 2002
    Posts: 13,988

    fab32
    Member Emeritus

    It's been over a year since I've had my Bridgeport used for anything other than cuting stock to size, locating, drilling and/or tapping holes. Time to get something with a challenge bolted to the table. Thanks for the inspiration and I'll definitely be keeping up with your curreent project.

    Frank
     
  14. George Miller
    Joined: Dec 26, 2008
    Posts: 413

    George Miller
    Member
    from NC usa


    One thing to remember if you get blue chips you running the spindle to fast. That will wreck your tool bits.
     
  15. Milhouse
    Joined: Feb 12, 2007
    Posts: 55

    Milhouse
    Member
    from RI

    Nice work!!! How did you make the curved slots for the o-ring groove?
     
  16. robleticia
    Joined: Oct 15, 2007
    Posts: 2,499

    robleticia
    Member

  17. hotrodjeep
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
    Posts: 867

    hotrodjeep
    Member
    from Tama, Iowa

    Wow, Blue chips running aluminum, George your amazing.........

    JK I know blue chips are from Steel... Now I've turned some Copper/Bronze alloys purple... HOT Hot Hot. When they're that hot and you use WD-40 as a cutting fluid it smells like cotton candy.

    George, you make me wish I could go back 10 years and work in the mold shop again. My First job was squaring mold halves on a Horz. Kearny Trecker, No readout and the dials were worn so bad you couldn't trust them. I used a mag base and a 0-1" dial indicator for every thing.

    My next big perchase will be 220 to the garage and a Mill.. I've got some Ideas that need to be put into metal.

    Jeff
     
  18. This is something you learn fast. I have a coolant system on my B'port, so machining steel is not a problem.

    Bob
     
  19. George Miller
    Joined: Dec 26, 2008
    Posts: 413

    George Miller
    Member
    from NC usa

    The grooves around head bolt holes and push rod holes, I used a boring head with a groove tool in it. The long curved slots I use a 1/8 end mill and free hand it. That means turning both handles at the same time.
     
  20. George Miller
    Joined: Dec 26, 2008
    Posts: 413

    George Miller
    Member
    from NC usa

    Yes I use a 1" travel indicator also. For the 220 I use a 5 hp 3 phase motor on 220 single phase. It will phase 3 phase for all your motors if you don't use more than 5 hp at a time. You have to start the motor some how before you turn the power on to it. I get mine turning with a small motor with a belt going form the small one to the big one. At one time I used a pull starter from a small engine. The down side is you loose about 1/3 of your HP with this setup. But I have all the power I need for my lath and mill.
     
  21. George Miller
    Joined: Dec 26, 2008
    Posts: 413

    George Miller
    Member
    from NC usa

    Wow, Blue chips running aluminum, George your amazing........
    _______________________________________________________

    You got me, But when the alum sticks to the cutter you know you are turn to fast, of course with coolant you can run fast. Funny thing I use WD 40 also.
     
  22. 1950ChevySuburban
    Joined: Dec 20, 2006
    Posts: 6,206

    1950ChevySuburban
    Member Emeritus
    from Tucson AZ

    Amazing. Truly amazing.
     
  23. Have you ever considered buying a Variable Frequency drive (VFD)? A 5 hp model will be realtively cheap, and will convert 220 single phase into 3 phase. Plus you get better RPM and Torque control with out the power loss. I use numerous VFD's at work on test fixtures as most of the motors we have are 3 phase, and it is just cheaper and easier to install the VFD then run a new 3 phase line.
     
  24. burl
    Joined: Nov 28, 2007
    Posts: 606

    burl
    Member
    from Minnesota

    George,
    get your hands on some high speed semi finish roughers if you can.You could be taking most of the stock of in one pass.
     
  25. Bib Overalls
    Joined: Aug 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,068

    Bib Overalls
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  26. brg404
    Joined: Nov 10, 2008
    Posts: 139

    brg404
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I couldn't presume to know about George's setup, but my J2 isnt anywhere fast enough to run high speed bits. And watching this project go together is even more amazing if you have done much hand work on a big mill.

    Very impressive!
     

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