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Hot Rods Unusual Leaf Spring Gizmo.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by fiftyv8, Aug 24, 2020.

  1. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,143

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Anybody ever seen one of these before.
    I've never seen one and was wondering how it works exactly.
    Is it of interest to us hot rod guys??? Spring Assembler 106949_n.jpg Spring Assembler 155089_n.jpg
     
  2. MantulaMan
    Joined: Jun 19, 2018
    Posts: 40

    MantulaMan

    Looks like a good way to kill yourself imo.

    Vintage tools are all well and good but when its something like a spring compressor you dont want to muck about.

    Sent from my SM-A105G using Tapatalk
     
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  3. acme30
    Joined: Jun 13, 2011
    Posts: 175

    acme30
    Member
    from Australia

    Hi Russ

    I am wondering if there is a piece missing? I suspect maybe there is a flat bar or I beam that goes in the cradle end that screws / compresses the spring. If the compressor bit went over the spring and then had an i beam parallel to the spring then it would lengthen the spring when the screw handle was turned in
     
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  4. brading
    Joined: Sep 9, 2019
    Posts: 269

    brading
    Member

    That sounds reasonable acme30 as what I can find out about it is for spring spreading.
     

  5. woodiewagon46
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 1,742

    woodiewagon46
    Member
    from New York

    It's a K R Wilson A-321 Rear Spring Assembly Press, for a Model A Ford. There is a picture of it on page 272 of the service bulletins. You have the complete unit and it's not missing any pieces. Model A collectors would love it.
     
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  6. woodiewagon46
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 1,742

    woodiewagon46
    Member
    from New York

    How it works is, the two fingers at the top clamp to the rear crossmember flange. The two rods hang down and the threaded piece with the cradle fit under the banjo. You connect the threaded part to the two rods and clamp away until the rear is up enough to remove the shackles. Yes, it does sound dangerous to me also, but that's how it was done back then.
     
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  7. woodiewagon46
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 1,742

    woodiewagon46
    Member
    from New York

    If you can get a copy of the Model A Ford, service bulletin's for February 1928, there is a picture of it in use on page 226. I stand corrected, it doesn't clamp to the flange on the rear crossmember it goes over the top of the crossmember. They also show two blocks of wood that go between the rear end and the shackles. Still looks dangerous.
     
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  8. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,143

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    ACME 30 was onto something there, just that the beam he is looking for is actually the axle .
    Boy, when wound up it becomes a weapon.
    There can be a lot of energy in a compressed spring of any age or type from what I have seen over the years...
     
  9. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,143

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Here is another I just found says it is for a 1940 Ford. Ford 1940 Spring 61_o.jpg
     
    Jet96 likes this.
  10. That's an overload giz; it is upside down in the picture; clamps to bells around the banjo and ends of the spring push on the frame. Must have been a lot of different overload set-ups made back in olden times.
     
  11. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,143

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    I am just trying to imagine how these two components relate to each other, since a 40 rearend would have the actual spring behind the diff, yet the secondary springs looks to be in line with the diff so to speak?
     
  12. The added spring ends up centered right on top of the banjo. The long leaf is on top and either bears on the stock axle bumpers or there could have be added stops for the spring.

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  13. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,143

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    I see, that will work then.
    I just wonder how many of these types of Gizmo's are out there that have been conceived over the years, especially ones that were commercialised, then of course you probably have a good number of homemade stuff as well...
     
  14. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,310

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    A 'reserved thinker' told me he had a Model A spring that he wanted to disassemble, but was worried (convinced!) that when the center bolt was removed it would shoot the upper leaves into the adjoining county. :eek:
    I suggested an old blanket, and wrapped the spring not too tightly, and buzzed the nut off with a 3/8" drive impact. "Whump"... No nothin', just jumped once like a lazy old Western Diamondback. Unwrapped 3 layers of blanket and picked up the leaves. Didn't even have to sweep the driveway...
     
  15. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,143

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Ha, that sound about right.
    Knowledge is king, which usually comes with experience or good advice.

    I took a rear spring out of a 36 Coupe years ago with a buddy who had a lot of experience with that kind of stuff.
    The spring was loaded and ready to break loose.
    He got to a point where it was ready to release and said, stand back and he trow a large hammer at some part of it and it sprung out big time.

    Glad I had no hands or fingers any where near that event...
     

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