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Hot Rods Unusual engine photos

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by William Thompson, Sep 28, 2018.

  1. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
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    loudbang
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  2. Fordors
    Joined: Sep 22, 2016
    Posts: 2,751

    Fordors
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    The upper one is a 151 Miller marine engine and that eventually evolved into the 200 and 220 cu. in. Millers. I believe the lower photo is a later iteration of the 151, could be a 200 or a 220. Just going by images of Miller/early Offenhauser fours I think Fred O started to use more bolts on the crankcase side covers after he acquired the company and patterns after Miller's bankruptcy.
    Also, the lower photo above is the flip side of the engine in post # 835.
     
  3. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 29,019

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    Dick Harroun in 1941 with an experimental 8 cylinder opposed engine. Only 2 were ever made, one went to the military and this one was installed into a midget racer.

    engine1 Dick Harroun in 1941 wit.jpg

    1918 Chevrolet V-8 Engine

    engine2 1918 Chevrolet V-8 Engine.jpg
     
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  4. Fordors
    Joined: Sep 22, 2016
    Posts: 2,751

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    Another Novi picture. Those working in Bud Winfield's garage are left to right: Pete Clark, Tony Morosco, Bud, Marv Jenkins (son of Ab Jenkins), and Lou Welch. Bud designed it and Lou was the money man. Scan_0188.jpg

    Photo credit to the Marv Jenkins Collection. RIP Marv.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019
  5. XXL__
    Joined: Dec 28, 2009
    Posts: 1,852

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    Allison V-1710 in Art Arfons' Green Monster #5...

    DSC_0036a.JPG
     
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  6. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 29,019

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    Miller 91 Straight Eight, raced in the 1920's

    engine3 Miller 91 Straight Eight, raced in the 1920's.JPG

    Ford 159-cid four-cam turbocharged V-8.

    engine4 ford It was a 159-cid four-cam turbocharged V-8..JPG
     
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  7. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
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    Oldsmobile 215cid aluminum V8, circa 1961-63, fitted with Hilborn fuel injection.

    int2 a This is an Oldsmo.jpg

    int2 b This is an Oldsmo.jpg

    int2 This is an Oldsmobil.jpg
     
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  8. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 29,019

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    Meyer-Drake Offenhauser 255-cid four-cylinder

    engine5  Meyer-Drake Offenhauser 255-cid four-cylinder.JPG

    183-cid Monroe Four 1920 Indy race winner.

    engine6 183-cid Monroe Four 1920indy race winner..JPG
     
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  9. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
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  10. Prototype Ford twin plug small block
    P8040394.JPG
     
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  11. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 4,009

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    That engine also looks like it had some sort of mechanical fuel injection system, with variable timing injection. Any more info?



    Bones
     
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  12. studebakerjoe
    Joined: Jul 7, 2015
    Posts: 691

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    Boneyard, sort of reminds me of the pump setup on my old 6.9 diesel wonder if that influenced it.
     
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  13. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 4,009

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    Could be.. International and Ford were hanging out together back then. Hope we get some more info!



    Bones
     
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  14. studebakerjoe
    Joined: Jul 7, 2015
    Posts: 691

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    Oddly similar looking in ways. ac1c22c9-c515-4b4a-82cc-8df2dccc5adbinlinepump-1.jpg
     
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  15. Unfortunately I do not have any more information on this particular engine. It is in the Museum Of Speed collection in Lincoln, NE. I took this photo when I was there a few years ago but failed to take a photo of the information card. I spoke with the then curator of the museum about several of these unusual Ford engines they had in their collection. He said that Ford had been clearing out some "old inventory" from their museum and Bill Smith had bought several for the Museum of Speed. If you ever get a chance to visit this museum it is well worth the effort.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
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  16. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
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    Miller's 151cid "Marine" engine was also introduced in 1926. Many design features were carried
    over from Miller's 310cid straight eight marine engine. Athough conceived for hydroplane racing,
    car racers discovered and adopted these engine; often stroking them to 183cid or even 221cid.

    engine9  email.jpg

    Miller engines traditionally featured barrel crankcases. Crankshafts are removed by pulling them
    out through the rear. Cylinder heads and cylinders were cast as one integral component. (No head
    gasket to fail!) This particular model was designed by Leo Goossen in late 1930 and early 1931.
    It features dual overhead camshafts and twin downdraft carbs.

    engine10 email.jpg
     
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  17. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 4,009

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    Well don’t I feel silly now. I visited that Museum two years ago. They had to drag me out of there! Most awesome! But I guess I missed that one. It would be easy as there are tons of things to look at. We got there several hours before closing time... but that wasn’t enough time for me. My friends and the guards had to literally remove me.. with me hollaring “ I’m not done! “ lol.
    I highly recommend this museum to any gearhead! I’m going back and have my wife just drop me off in the morning and come get me at closing.



    Bones
     
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  18. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
    Posts: 3,034

    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
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    from FRENCHTOWN

    I think that is a ProCo engine. That stands for Programmed Combustion. It was an early predecessor to some of the more modern EFI engines with fast burn combustion chamber characteristics and variable injection timing. It was a joint effort by the Ford Scientific Research Lab and Advanced Engine Engineering, never intended to be a "performance package" engine per se. I did not work on that program (I was a Ford Engine Development engineer for 31 years) and although it never made it to production it did help advance the technology of more efficient, cleaner engines we have today. One of its features was the use of "stratified charge" where the fuel/air mixture was not homogeneously mixed in the combustion chamber but had a pre-chamber of one fuel/air mixture and a larger chamber with a leaner mixture.
     
  19. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 4,009

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    Thanks, that’s kinda what I thought based on my observation. ( the injection part) .
    I can imagine working on engine development for Ford! That would be my dream job.


    Bones
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
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  20. Cosmo50
    Joined: Sep 8, 2011
    Posts: 195

    Cosmo50
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    from California

    Here are two that I saw at car shows.
    1) Seagrave Firetruck "Batmobile"
    16 Liter 6 Cylinder of pure awesomeness
    CAR SHOWS 096.JPG CAR SHOWS 120.JPG CAR SHOWS 121.JPG CAR SHOWS 142.JPG CAR SHOWS 147.JPG CAR SHOWS 148.JPG CAR SHOWS 149.JPG CAR SHOWS 150.JPG
    2) 1936 Cord - My dream car
    Lycoming V8
    IMG_6917.JPG IMG_6918.JPG IMG_6919.JPG IMG_6924.JPG IMG_6925.JPG IMG_6927.JPG IMG_6928.JPG
     
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  21. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 29,019

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    Also designed for Miller by Leo Goossen, Miller's V16 design debuted at Indy in 1931. This is
    the second Miller V16 built, it was used in 1947's Indy 500. 2.625" bore. 3.125 stroke.

    engine11 email.jpg


    Miller's 308cid DOHC V8 was specifically designed for use in Miller's (two) 1932 four wheel drive
    Indy Cars. One of these cars won the 1936 AAA Championship. The other traveled to Europe to
    contest international races. This may be the first V8 to feature dual overhead camshafts. Cylinder
    banks are arranged in a 45° V, and a flat (180°) crankshaft is used. New to Miller, its split aluminum
    crankcase features babbitted bearings in removable caps. Heads/cylinders are cast iron.

    engine12 email.jpg
     
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  22. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 6,458

    seb fontana
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    from ct

    Just thinking that a 45° v block and 180° crank would make an odd firing order?
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
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  23. jimdillon
    Joined: Dec 6, 2005
    Posts: 2,900

    jimdillon
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    LB some cool Miller stuff there. I am not sure that the Miller V8 was the first DOHC V8 (I had thought Peugeot had developed one in the teens for aero although I cannot locate a photo of it at this moment). I wrote an article a few years ago on Miller's first engine (the 289 four SOHC) and I believe this was pretty much the last engine he developed before he went bankrupt. It may not have been the engine itself but the whole car which were two four wheel drive cars-expensive-too much for the balance sheet. The idea was a great one in the mind of Harry Miller but with the depression and Miller's shortcomings let's say on the ledger side of business, he could not stave off bankruptcy and one car went to the Four Wheel Drive Auto Co. of Wisconsin and the other car he kept bringing peanuts at the bankruptcy hearing.

    I believe though that the FWD car (driven by Brisko) removed the "troublesome" V8 and installed a 255 four. The engine bought at bankruptcy ran at race in Italy (driven by De Paolo) without spectacular result. I believe both engines survive which is kind of cool though.
     
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  24. sliceddeuce
    Joined: Aug 15, 2017
    Posts: 2,982

    sliceddeuce
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  25. sliceddeuce
    Joined: Aug 15, 2017
    Posts: 2,982

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    Note even # of cylinders. 1 mar.jpg
     
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  26. 28dreyer
    Joined: Jan 23, 2008
    Posts: 1,128

    28dreyer
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    from Minnesota

    Pictured is the Marchetti engine of 1927 which only one was built. It's called a "Cam Engine" because it has no crankshaft. The reason it can be a radial with an even number of cylinders is because while being a four stroke cycle, the cylinders fire once every revolution.

    A similar 4 cylinder engine was patented by Harold Caminez in the same era and he was bought out by Fairchild Aircraft. That engine was certified and used for a short while in their aircraft but abandoned in 1929.

    [​IMG]
    Fairchild then developed the Ranger air cooled 6 cylinder in-line SOHC Hemispherical head engine which ran inverted with the cylinders down. Over 20,000 of these engines were built for WWII training aircraft.

    While Caminez worked for Fairchild and may have developed the Ranger, he is credited for being the chief engineer for Allison in the early 30's and the development of the Allison V1710, also a SOHC, but water cooled V12 used extensively in WWII fighter planes and more lately in dragsters, speed boats, and pulling tractors.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
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  27. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 29,019

    loudbang
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    Fred Offenhauser bought out Miller's engine production business in 1934, and began producing
    engines for Midget racecars. This series of engines started at 98cid, but was soon increased to
    102cid. (The later version is shown here.) The design was remarkably stable for nearly four
    decades. Basic specifications: aluminum crankcase with cast nickel iron heads/cylinders,
    two-valves-per-cylinder, 3.0" bore by 3.6125" stroke.

    engine13 email.jpg


    Dale Drake and Lou Meyer bought the Offenhauser engine company in 1946. In 1947, Offenhauser
    started production of the "high tower" 270cid four cylinder engine. It featured dual overhead cams,
    four valves per cylinder, five main bearings, 4.3125" bore by 4.625" stroke, and a compression
    ratio of about 13:1. These engines produced ~415hp and easily revved to 6000rpm.

    engine14 email.jpg
     
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  28. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 29,019

    loudbang
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    Didn't anyone compete with Offenhauser? J.C. Agajanian paid $225,000 to commission this
    274cid V8 racing engine. He hired Leo Goossen to design it around a production Studebaker V8
    engine block, with special machined-steel DOHC heads. A racecar with this engine arrived at the
    1953 Indy 500, but its team withdrew after their high-torque starter damaged their crankshaft.

    engine15 email.jpg


    The history of the 500 includes many obscure engines. Charles Voelker of Detroit built this
    273cid DOHC V12 - an impressive but ill-fated one-off. Although entered in every Indy 500
    from 1937 through 1949, it only qualified for the big race once. In 1938, Henry Banks started
    in 31st position and completed 109 of 200 laps before suffering a rod bearing failure.


    engine16 email.jpg
     
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  29. Someone that lives about 120 miles from me is selling a "Briscoe" V8 engine. Do not know the condition, year is 1916-? Not much info out there on it. From what I could gather they were around 215ci, 3" bore, 3-1/2" stroke. If the price is right I thought it would be a cool engine to have on a stand in the shop. Clean and dress it up! First 3 pics are of the motor that is for sale. o_bd41b5b6fdbe779d8aa59d512df79b1b.jpg o_a82b836eb2921ebd0a5624e69982aca6.jpg o_1043f6dee90597bf701f6298d4bd061c.jpg 5441509047_d1dd052ded_b.jpg 191112.jpg 191113.jpg 191111.jpg
     
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