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Trans oil cooler line question

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 55yak, Apr 6, 2013.

  1. 55yak
    Joined: Nov 5, 2011
    Posts: 41

    55yak
    Member

    I was wondering if anyone out there can help me with a cooler line question? I just installed a 700R4 in my 1955 Pontiac and I'm at the point where I need to install a cooler before I add trans oil. My old B&M Hydro didn't have a cooler but I was told the 700R4 won't live long without one. I don't have an internal cooler in my aluminum radiator so I want to use a small trans cooler like Hayden, B&M and others make. These coolers as you know are meant to use clamped on rubber hoses at the ports. I'm too lazy (or not skilled enough) to build solid metal lines for the rubber hoses to attach to, so I want to use the flexible stainless hoses like Advance Adapters make all the way from the front where the cooler is located next to my radiator to the transmission inlet and outlet fittings. No problem attaching the transmission side of these lines, but how do you attach these to the non threaded open ports of a small cooler? I would sure appreciate any advice or opinions from anyone that has done this before I purchase these stainless braided hoses. I have a feeling it will be embarrassingly simple but I don't have a clue.Thanks in advance to anyone who cares to opine.
    55yak
     
  2. phat rat
    Joined: Mar 18, 2001
    Posts: 4,393

    phat rat
    Member

    A small cooler may not cool it. I'm of the opinion that a cooler can't be too large only too small.
     
  3. If the cooler you are looking at has no threaded fittings you'll have to get a threaded/ barb fitting. Then add a short hose from cooler to fitting with two clamps and carry on . Adapt your stainless line to the threaded barb.
    Some coolers have threaded inlet and outlets, maybe look for a different cooler.

    Trans lines are a fun easy project.
    Out of the trans, around the starter, along oil pan, up to front.
    An hour tops.
     
  4. Dane
    Joined: May 6, 2010
    Posts: 1,352

    Dane
    Member
    from Soquel, CA


  5. woodiewagon46
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 1,713

    woodiewagon46
    Member
    from New York

    55yak, I did exactly what you did in my Deuce roadster. I purchased everything from Godman Performance, 800-456-2369. I mounted it horizontally on the pass. side of the frame rails and fabricated a scoop to direct air across the coils. Godman has about two dozen sizes to choose from. I agree with dane and use A-N fittings and braided hose.
     
  6. 55yak
    Joined: Nov 5, 2011
    Posts: 41

    55yak
    Member

    Thanks Phat Rat, I thought a small 4"x11" would be big enough but I guess I had better reconsider and install the largest I can fit without blocking my radiator.
    55yak
     
  7. 55yak
    Joined: Nov 5, 2011
    Posts: 41

    55yak
    Member

    I haven't seen any auxilliary coolers with threaded fittings but if you think they make them, I will keep looking. Thanks or advice.
    55yak
     
  8. 55yak
    Joined: Nov 5, 2011
    Posts: 41

    55yak
    Member

    Dane and Woodiewagon46, thanks for input, I will call Godman Performance and see what they have. I love this site because people share info with each other.
    55yak
     
  9. chasracer54
    Joined: Dec 30, 2012
    Posts: 17

    chasracer54
    Member

    You want a stacked type cooler not the fin and tube type. Cools a lot better and you can use a smaller size cooler for the same cooling ability. B&M makes a bunch of different sizes with the threaded bungs on them along with their cooling ratings. http://bmracing.com/?page_id=1046

    Jegs, Summit and I am sure others are good sources for them.
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  10. Rookie1
    Joined: Apr 5, 2009
    Posts: 63

    Rookie1
    Member

    You can cut the hose barb off and use a compression fitting . Earl's has them to AN or just about any combination.
     
  11. 45_70Sharps
    Joined: May 19, 2010
    Posts: 331

    45_70Sharps
    Member

    You know, I was searching for someplace that sells the metal lines, tools and fittings to run new lines for my car and can't find them. I would rather have metal lines. I think it would look better to start with.
    Where do you get your stuff?
    I got a cooler and depending on the radiator that I end up using I will either use just that or that and the transmission.



    Check Summit. They have them.
     
  12. Engine man
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,476

    Engine man
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    Some auto parts stores make them or hydraulics suppliers can also make them. You can use brake lines in 5/16" or 3/8".
     
  13. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,793

    tfeverfred
    Member

    What's simpler than using rubber hose from the transmission to the cooler? Am I missing something?
     
  14. 45_70Sharps
    Joined: May 19, 2010
    Posts: 331

    45_70Sharps
    Member

    3/8 Brake line might be a good idea. The problem with having them made is that it would be nice to lay down there and figure the routing rather than having to come up with a template and bring it to them.
    Besides, I wouldn't mind doing it myself and having the stuff. This isn't the last car and even when I just buy them to do a little work and then sell them, it would be nice to be able to do lines if I needed to.

    Rubber is simple and I may go that route but the metal lasts well and I think it's going to have a better finished look to it, especially if I use the cooler and run it to the radiator.
     
  15. langy
    Joined: Apr 27, 2006
    Posts: 5,735

    langy
    Member Emeritus

    The rubber tends to get eaten by the trans fluid.
     
  16. I find that it looks like ass, doesn't last, and its not cool at all.
    Of course it's simple.
     
  17. 45_70Sharps
    Joined: May 19, 2010
    Posts: 331

    45_70Sharps
    Member

    They have new metal braided lines that are a rubber like core, Teflon coated and supposed to last like metal.
    Maybe they do, maybe they don't. I do prefer the look of the metal lines though.
    I don't like things that look half ass, cheap and easy way, even it they were done on the cheap and easy! Besides, metal braided lines are about as likely to be seen on my car as a billet steering wheel.
     
  18. JonF
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 169

    JonF
    Member

    How much trans fluid pressure are we talking about here?
     
  19. 45_70Sharps
    Joined: May 19, 2010
    Posts: 331

    45_70Sharps
    Member

    I don't know how much pressure a turbo 350 or the 700R4 runs at. I would think that any of the line options would hold up to the stock transmission fluid pressure though since Summit and the aftermarket cooler manufacturers say use the rubber lines.

    I still want solid lines for my car though.
     
  20. Bert Kollar
    Joined: Jan 10, 2007
    Posts: 967

    Bert Kollar
    Member

    Theres nothing wrong with the extruded finned coolers. I have used them to cool engine oil on race cars and I have two 727's with them now on street rods and everything is fine. I have an extra one I'll sell you for $25 plus the ride . It has fittings already on it and it is brand new
     

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  21. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,508

    gatz
    Member

    If the OP passes on the finned cooler, I may be interested.
    BTW, do you know what pressure the lines to/from the 727 are subject to?

    I'm going to do the initial start-up & run-in of my 331/727 on a home made stand. If a simple loop of tubing would suffice for short runs, I may do that.
    In any case I'll need a cooler eventually.
     
  22. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,793

    tfeverfred
    Member

    I had an OT car that used rubber lines and they were still on the car when I sold it. I've never heard of trans fluid eating a rubber hose. Routed neatly, rubber hose won't look like ass, unless you normally work that way.

    I'd think a hard metal line would flex a little, but to each his own.
     
  23. 45_70Sharps
    Joined: May 19, 2010
    Posts: 331

    45_70Sharps
    Member

    That's a better deal than I just got through Summit.



    I'm sure that the proper rubber lines, designed for transmission fluid would hold up.
    Yes metal lines would be able to flex. They've been using them for many decades in factory cars and without being able to flex they would break.
     
  24. On a plow truck rubber lines look great !
    Especially when that truck needs to get back to work ASAP and you get him back on the road in 30 minutes.

    Or in a cluttered busy engine compartment that nobody can see anything any way. On a sanitary, detailed engine compartment or a open hotrod engine compartment is different.

    Rubber lines, designed specifically for auto trans coolers will last for about 20,000 miles or so under tough all season conditions. A bit more or less depending on exact circumstances. 20k miles might take 20 years or more on some pleasure drive cars but that rubber will be disintegrated long before 20 (about 5ish) years used or not.
     
  25. G'day, Your typical parts stores will generally have more than one type of rubber hose. Most will carry a rubber hose that is specifically designed to use with atf and will hold up to age and pressure. It is a bit more that power steering hose or fuel hose but it does a good job. Also, if you buy the Hayden cooler kit (available at Oreilly's) it will have hose, clamps, and fittings.

    ms
     

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