Register now to get rid of these ads!

Hot Rods Tranny cooler question

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by rbelgum, Oct 6, 2015.

  1. rbelgum
    Joined: Aug 28, 2015
    Posts: 7

    rbelgum

    Thanks for the ideas guys, I will try to post some picks this week.
     
  2. LWEL9226
    Joined: Jul 7, 2012
    Posts: 298

    LWEL9226
    Member
    from So. Oregon

    Is it possible to run too much cooler on a transmission ???

    Lynn W
     
  3. lucas doolin
    Joined: Feb 7, 2013
    Posts: 425

    lucas doolin
    Member

    A separate trans cooler is the way to go. OEMs use a serpentine coil in the radiator because it's cheap but they are prone to developing cracks and the result is AT fluid that looks like chocolate milk. Coolant system pressure is greater than trans, coolant finds its way into the trans. Very expensive trans rebuild follows. We see cases several times a year, usually on the same OT brands. Worse case scenario with separate air cooled trans cooler is ATF leak that will grab your attention.
     
  4. Yes especially if you live where it gets cold. That is why I usually end up blocking or partially blocking mine when it turns off cold.
     
  5. krylon32
    Joined: Jan 29, 2006
    Posts: 7,090

    krylon32
    Alliance Vendor
    from Nebraska

    On my automatic transmission hotrods I use the B&M street rod cooler mounted on the frame rail along with the Derale cooler trans pan. Never had a failure yet. I've never been a fan of plumbing the trans thru the radiator on a car that already has marginal cooling capacity. JMO
     
  6. flatheadpete
    Joined: Oct 29, 2003
    Posts: 10,107

    flatheadpete
    Member
    from Burton, MI

    I use a power steering cooler out of a late model Trailblazer. It's mounted on the outside of the framerail (plenty of airflow) on the passenger side of my '50 Ford with a 302/C4 combo. Easy, small and efficient. I haven't had any problems at all.
     
  7. rdemilt
    Joined: Jan 12, 2009
    Posts: 135

    rdemilt
    Member
    from so florida

    Im looking to remount a aftermarket transmission cooler that the PO did a poor job of doing. Im thinking of mounting it on the outside of the frame rail spaced off 2" or so to allow some movement of air around all sides, between frame and running board . its currently mounted on the bottom of the body close to the exhaust system, its not very secure and has too much rubber line to suit my taste. I know there are hundreds of options but Im asking for opinions as to will this work.
    1951 ford F1 AOD is the application.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2015
  8. dan c
    Joined: Jan 30, 2012
    Posts: 2,184

    dan c
    Member

    i had a buddy back in the '70s that worked at a cooler plant. needless to say, lots of cars in the st. louis area ran cooler condensers back then. but, i found a good selection at jeg's.
     
  9. Ice man
    Joined: Mar 12, 2008
    Posts: 980

    Ice man
    Member

    Being and old refrigerant guy, I needed one for my Van and I used an old commercial refrigerator condenser and it worker well. So I did the same on my 29 roadster with an AOD and I live in the Islands. Never even showed a sign of heat. Iceman
     
  10. stimpy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,547

    stimpy

    most of the newer OEM radiators with the plastic radiator tanks have plate style coolers in them ( GM use stainless coolers w/ metric fittings we talked about here ) , my salvage yard is happy to let me have them if I remove the tanks off the radiator as they want the aluminum center sections for the scrap . all I have to do is make brackets to hold them ( and the inlets have external threads for the rad nuts ) . I also snag the oil coolers on the HD pick up trucks ..
     
  11. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,608

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thats right...and dont you forget it.
     
    porknbeaner and czuch like this.
  12. trollst
    Joined: Jan 27, 2012
    Posts: 1,958

    trollst
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    My 36 ford pickup has a built 327 with a turbo 350 that's cooled with a lone hayden cooler. It's mounted on brackets spaced 1 inch in front of the lower rad tank, fed with steel lines, has run seventeen years in 110 degree temps to -20 temps, all with no hassle. My truck weighs 2770 pounds, tranny never works hard enough to get hot enough to damage it. Change tranny oil every couple years depending on your mileage, mine has close to 100,000 on it now, been trouble free.
     
  13. Dan Timberlake
    Joined: Apr 28, 2010
    Posts: 1,302

    Dan Timberlake
    Member

    There are plenty of "sources" that talk about the maximum recommended ATF temperature, but I don't recall any info about what the minimum should be ( or of there even is a minimum.).

    Many early auto transmissions were air cooled, with no external cooler at all.

    Ending up too cool would be one of the things on my mind if adding an external cooler.
    I'd probably install a temp gage first.
     
  14. yruhot
    Joined: Dec 17, 2009
    Posts: 564

    yruhot
    Member

    I run on in my 55 chevy like this also with a strong 454 and a loose converter here in vegas, gets hot here. Not my daily driver though but it works good no problems.
     
  15. Running it through the radiator actually heats up the fluid. I've run a few vehicles with a stand alone cooler in front with no issues
     
  16. Dan I would not have any idea what a min temp would be. I know from experience that you don't want to run your equipment too cold. I would think that proper operating temp would be in the same range hot or cold, if you want it to run @ 180 in the summer for example you would want it to be pretty close to that in the winter. Certainly within 15 or 20 degrees of that.

    I have a couple of trans temp gauges floating around here, I can never find one when I want one. :eek: A good indication of over heating if you don't have a gauge is that it blows fluid out the vent pipe. LOL :D :D
     
    czuch likes this.
  17. hudson48
    Joined: Oct 16, 2007
    Posts: 2,772

    hudson48
    Member

    With the separate trans cooler there are some schools of thought about the fluid running back into the trans when it is sitting and overfilling depending on the height of the cooler relative to the trans. To prevent that can you install a one way valve in one of the lines so that it doesn't run back? I would think the return line??
     
  18. Blues4U
    Joined: Oct 1, 2015
    Posts: 5,299

    Blues4U
    Member
    from So Cal

    The main danger to the trans oil from heat is oxidation. Atmospheric oxygen starts to attack the hydrocarbons in the base oil and in some additives, leading to the development of acidic and corrosive compounds that start to attack the metals in the trans, soft metals (brass, bronze, copper, aluminum, lead, etc) are especially vulnerable. The oxidized hydrocarbons also increase in weight and develop lacquers and varnishes that are polar and are attracted to the metal surfaces and they will plate out on the surfaces, which can cause valves and pistons to stick, leading to slippage of clutch packs and bands. Which of course causes additional heat, and the cycle gets worse. The rate of oxidation doubles for every 10 degrees C increase in temperature. You'll see this as the oil getting darker, it also increases in viscosity. If you can keep the oil cooler it will last much longer and keep the trans much cleaner. Allow the oil to get hot and the service life degrades exponentially. At extreme temperatures the hydrocarbons can crack forming new and corrosive compounds. The color will darken even more and the oil can develop an odor (it smells burnt). If your trans oil gets like this you need to get it out ASAP! ATF's are heavily fortified with detergents, so if you've let the oil go too long once, change it more frequently a few times and it may clean itself up. Synthetic fluids are naturally resistant to oxidation and will last far longer than mineral oils, they are also more thermally stable and will degrade much slower in the presence of heat.
     
  19. Morrisman
    Joined: Dec 9, 2003
    Posts: 1,600

    Morrisman
    Member
    from England

    Am I overdoing it with a tranny cooler this big:

    [​IMG]

    Is it overkill, or should I stick with the one I had before I swapped to an aluminum rad? That one is pretty much half the size. Temps around here are over 100f for a good few months of the year, but it never gets cold as such. I never measured my tranny temp though, just don't want to block my rad cooling air for no good reason..

    [​IMG]
     
  20. That cooler is insanely large. At least you can't see the aluminium rad I guess. Wow
     
  21. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,608

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

     
  22. I have never had one overfill from the cooler syphoning. I would think that it would want it on supply and not suction. If it is on the return line it will normally operate open and will not close when not under pressure. On supply it will normally operate open and close when not under pressure.

    At any rate unless your lines are a mile long and your cooler holds a few liters it should not be a problem.
     
  23. elba
    Joined: Feb 9, 2013
    Posts: 623

    elba
    Member

    You are going to say I am nuts but you do not need a cooler on your car. I have built many T350's. I have built two 38 Chevy sedans wthT350 and did not use a cooler. Put many miles on them. I installed a T400 convertor which holds about 1 qt more fluid. Just make a line from out port to in port. I put many miles on both of them without one problem. Some P/G did not use a cooler and the Corvairs ( very reliable tranny ) did not use a cooler. But I would recommend a cooler with a high stall convertor .
     
  24. Morrisman
    Joined: Dec 9, 2003
    Posts: 1,600

    Morrisman
    Member
    from England

    Yes, it is kind bigger than I expected when I ordered it. I might go back to the old one and check temp at the oil pan with my infra red heat gun thing, after a hot drive. Someone told me all I'm doing is shutting off air supply to the rad with this huge cooler..

    I ran a traditional type rad for three years, and no matter how much fan or shroud I used it still overheated on a hot day in traffic.

    [​IMG]
     
  25. haileyp1014
    Joined: Feb 15, 2006
    Posts: 930

    haileyp1014
    Member
    from so cal

    Didn't know hot rods had tranny coolers
     
  26. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,904

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    How else is he going to keep his beer cold?
     
    tfeverfred likes this.
  27. blue 49
    Joined: Dec 24, 2006
    Posts: 1,334

    blue 49
    Member
    from Iowa

    [​IMG] I used one like this on the outside of the frame (away from the exhaust) of a '49 Chevy pickup I had with a 305 and turbo 350. It must have worked OK because I never had any tranny trouble.

    Gary
     
    Habitual likes this.
  28. Blues4U
    Joined: Oct 1, 2015
    Posts: 5,299

    Blues4U
    Member
    from So Cal

    I would be concerned about that trans cooler blocking too much air flow to the radiator causing the engine to run hot.
     
  29. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 4,087

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I use two like blue 49 shows-in series-mounted inside framerail with 1 inch spacers for air flow--never had an issue
     
    Habitual likes this.
  30. Morrisman
    Joined: Dec 9, 2003
    Posts: 1,600

    Morrisman
    Member
    from England

    Spoke to my tranny guy today, he says the smaller one is perfectly adequate for my needs, unless I were to run a radical converter, so I've swapped back to the smaller one. Should free up some cool air flow for the rad.
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.