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Features traditional t bucket

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by merles_garage, Feb 23, 2012.

  1. Paul
    Joined: Aug 29, 2002
    Posts: 13,602

    Paul
    Editor

    ?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. lrs30
    Joined: Jan 30, 2007
    Posts: 2,130

    lrs30
    Member
    from Kentucky

    Man that's gotta be it, or one copied from it. but I think it had way wider wheels and tires and darker color. Not sure why I love that one! That thing had to be a blast to drive. Anybody know the builder of this T or if it's still around? I love how low and wide it is.. Is trade both my shit boxes for one set up like that...


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  3. steel rebel
    Joined: Jun 14, 2006
    Posts: 3,581

    steel rebel
    Member

    Featured in the latest Rodders Journal.
     
  4. lrs30
    Joined: Jan 30, 2007
    Posts: 2,130

    lrs30
    Member
    from Kentucky

    Killer I see my issue rubber banded to the mailbox now! Heading out to grab it


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  5. lrs30
    Joined: Jan 30, 2007
    Posts: 2,130

    lrs30
    Member
    from Kentucky

    I don't think that's it now that I see it in trj but it is built very similar. Quest continues lol


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  6. need louvers ?
    Joined: Nov 20, 2008
    Posts: 12,917

    need louvers ?
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    Cotton built three or four of those chassis for guys about forty years ago. There actually is a huge picture of one on this thread back at about page 30 or so. It's black with flames and has just recently got it's Ardun after running a flathead for about forty years. That particular car was featured in American Rodder about twenty years ago wearing a set of dark centered American mags and then current radials, but I remember seeing pictures of the car from the early seventies wearing the same Americans and wider Goodyear Blue streaks. Might just be the car you are referring to.
     
  7. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,146

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    The black and flamed version was Bob Knaack's car.
    Heres a pic...and I'll see can I round up that thread on Cotton's car for ya...

    Ok...here it is...but most pics are gone! :(
    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=53748&highlight=cotton+werksman

    BTW...Bob's car always had a sweet flatty in it and it looked fantastic. Now I'm NOT putting an ARDUN down as undesirable :D but I really did like the proportions with the flathead more!

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2014
  8. I did a quick test fit of my weed burner headers that I got when I BOUGHT MY 1917 RPU. Kind of like the look

    [​IMG]
     
  9. robber
    Joined: Nov 25, 2011
    Posts: 1,541

    robber
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    from NoCo

    I dig that hrm2k... looks trick and the tones through 8 separate ports will be sweet ;) Are the individual pipes tacked together on the bottom side?
     
  10. the center 2 are together. It is just a 3 piece deal for each side. Each pipe will have it's own baffle that came with the headers. I figure I will make some kind of attachment for all 4 pipes. Just really like the way they look
     
  11. a boner
    Joined: Dec 25, 2004
    Posts: 3,820

    a boner
    Member

    image.jpg What magazine was this "T" featured in?....not really mainstream, but it sure is a slick "T"!
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2014
  12. Seth Hammond's right hand drive T was on the cover and featured in the February 1973 issue of Street Rod magazine. Seth and family are still going fast at Bonneville.

    Mick
     
  13. found a detail today on my RPU that I am building. The chassis was done 20 years or so ago. I had never seen friction shocks mounted this way. The main mount is below the spring mount. The end attaches to the spring shackle frontend.jpg
     
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  14. Limey Kid
    Joined: Mar 5, 2006
    Posts: 818

    Limey Kid
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    I think those friction shocks and mounts might be Total Performance. Seem to remember seeing them in their catalogue and wondering how they would fit/look.
    Cheers,
    Stewart.
     
  15. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,146

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    Mine are like that. When Fitz owned it she broke a spring hanger and he blamed it on bind from the shocks being direct mounted to the shackles. After bolting in new perches, he made some shock links from Heim joints to get rid of the bind and now the front axle moves smoothly over bumps and the stiffness is way less.
     
  16. need louvers ?
    Joined: Nov 20, 2008
    Posts: 12,917

    need louvers ?
    Member

    A company on the west coast called Specialty Cars did that type of system as well. I agree 100% Hackerbuilt with needing some kind of link rather than just solid mounting them to the shackles. A male and female heim joint screwed together with a simple jamb nut would be enough.
     
  17. good to know guys......thanks. I will look in to doing a change before it hits the road
     
  18. a couple from today.........got a smoking deal on some head lights..........and I got my gauges in my tunnel dash..............moving forward
    first picture shows the front shock mounts

    frontend.jpg mock up.jpg dash and column.jpg
     
  19. Changed the lights on my RPU........like the look a lot

    new lights combined.jpg
     
  20. need louvers ?
    Joined: Nov 20, 2008
    Posts: 12,917

    need louvers ?
    Member

    Like them too! That looks like it might be an entire Specialty Cars chassis. They were on of the first to do four bars on T-Bucket frames when that was all the rage for everything else.
     
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  21. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,506

    falcongeorge
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    from BC

    And hugely famous, rightfully so.
     
  22. YOu are correct Chip, it is a specialty car chassis. I finally asked and wrote it down so I could transfer that info
     
  23. hotrodscott2003
    Joined: Jul 1, 2008
    Posts: 339

    hotrodscott2003
    Member

    20140312_182831.jpg 20140411_180626.jpg 20140411_180549.jpg 20140518_154204.jpg

    My little hotrod...324 Olds, Hydromatic, originally built in 1959. FUN car, and was a total mess when we got it.
     
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  24. need louvers ?
    Joined: Nov 20, 2008
    Posts: 12,917

    need louvers ?
    Member

  25. rodney woolnough
    Joined: Mar 11, 2008
    Posts: 131

    rodney woolnough
    Member
    from tasmania

    any one know of the history of the twister T that Barris had , did he by it or did he actually build it
     
  26. denis4x4
    Joined: Apr 23, 2005
    Posts: 2,725

    denis4x4
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Colorado

    Believe it or not, the original car was a trade in at a local Rambler dealer in San Diego where I was working. I called Barris and he bought it sight on seen for next to nothing. It was originally candy apple red and was powered by a small block DeSoto hemi with open exhausts. I drove it from San Diego to Barris's house at night with a friend following me. The only changes were a new paint job, new headlights, interior and those silly headrests. This was probably late 1960 or early '61. Can't remember if there were 3 or 4 Strombergs, but itwould load up at idle. There was a border patrol check point at the north end of Camp Pendleton and when it was my turn to go, I blipped the throttle and blew soot all over the agent!
     
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  27. porknbeaner
    Joined: Sep 12, 2003
    Posts: 38,757

    porknbeaner
    Member

    Anything without a belly button is a monster.:eek::rolleyes:o_O

    Sorry I just couldn't resist. I am probably way off base here but it seems to me that if someone wanted to build a glass rod of any type and keep it traditional then a race theme would be in order. Although if memory serves me (pretty scratchy at best sometimes) there were some glass bodies on the market in the very late '50s to early '60s.

    Nice car by the way. I like the look of it and if you go through the trouble to make the pass door open it becomes less "kind of 1970's plastic;) witha belly button" esc. :D

    I think that Tommy has hit on a very important point here. Over the counter side pipes and things like spring car style headers were not readily available in the era that we normally shoot for.
    I do have a tendency to build most of my stuff with headers and more often then not they are custom fit to the vehicle, but as a rule, cars that you would see even into the middle '60s were running manifolds and pipes and not headers, not even lakes style headers.

    Good point Tommy.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2014
  28. need louvers ?
    Joined: Nov 20, 2008
    Posts: 12,917

    need louvers ?
    Member

    I have to agree with you 'Beaner. The handmade details are a large part of what separates an early sixties build from a later build when it comes to T-Buckets. By about '65 or so, the hey day of the T-Bucket kit really began.

    That is when a bunch of things started to happen style wise, but most significant was the availability of the cars as "Tab A, Slot B" kits using predominately the same components. Gone was the need to build a set of headers... Why bother when the "sprint" headers from the ad in the back of Hot Rod looked better than what you could probably fabricate, and were pretty outrageous right out of the box?

    When I was putting together my car last year, I had a pair of commercially built "sprint" type headers that I was contented to use... Sorta. Blast them, paint them VHT white and call it a deal... Until! I happened to walk into a friends back yard and spied a rusty, nasty, cut up pair of home made headers that had an interesting history stretching back to the early sixties. BINGO! For 5.00 I was in love. The flanges were all cut off, as they were bought at some to harvest for just that purpose. I took them home, had them blasted, made new flanges, straightened some of the more crooked tubes out, fixed some of the sloppiest welds and painted them VHT white, then called it a deal! That pair of somewhat crooked, home built headers are a major character point of my car today, and I wouldn't have it any other way, even if it took 6 times as long to get the job done. SAM_4106.JPG

    The other significant thing about earlier builds was yes, you are correct, Speedway and Almquist both started offering 'glass bodies to the masses via ads in HRM in the fall of '59. this not only EXPLODED the popularity of these cars, but led to another phenomenon I have read frequently. Removing the beat up steel body from an existing older built car for a dent free, lighter weight, "high tech" 'glass body!

    See, 'glass can be "vintage"! And it can have history, too.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2014
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  29. porknbeaner
    Joined: Sep 12, 2003
    Posts: 38,757

    porknbeaner
    Member

    A little off topic but it seems to me that I have seen or read about some glass bodied model As from the mid '50s. Maybe there was a thread on the HAMB about them. I don't think that they were a "manufactured" body as in mass produced though.

    It seems to me that there were kits to build your own Kookie T. I could be wrong. As exhaust goes that one was interesting and no one could say that it was not "trad". At least one rendition of it had 4 pipes per side running back below the bucket on each side.
     
  30. need louvers ?
    Joined: Nov 20, 2008
    Posts: 12,917

    need louvers ?
    Member

    You could buy a frame and body from Speedway, but that was about as close as you could get to a kit. Racemaster, Speed and Sport, and a couple of others came up with the "kit car" concept as it applies to T-Buckets in about '62 or '63 as far as I have been able to research. After '65 it seemed everybody had their own version of a T-Bucket kit.
     

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