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Torque straps

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by lukey, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. lukey
    Joined: May 27, 2009
    Posts: 668

    lukey
    Member

    Lets see how you guys made your torque straps...I'm debating between a torque strap on my car or a solid motor mount on the drivers side. I have alot of obstacles in the way of a standard torque strap (oil filter, fuel filter, oil pressure line...) so lets see some pics please. My car is a 58 ford custom 300 with a 300 hp 302 and a three speed on the column. Nothing wild, just a driver that I plan to race once or twice a year.


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    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013
  2. cmyhtrod
    Joined: Nov 29, 2008
    Posts: 360

    cmyhtrod
    Member
    from ct

    I take it that a 3/8 chain doesn't count?
     
  3. lukey
    Joined: May 27, 2009
    Posts: 668

    lukey
    Member

    If it stop the motor from torquing, it does. That's actually what I was going to do, but having room issues.


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  4. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,796

    tfeverfred
    Member

    I just put a solid mount on the drivers side. I didn't get any vibrations like people said I would. My cars a T Bucket with a 350 SBC.
     
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  5. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    Early SBC sidemount type mounts and probably many others can be made into torque limiters...from memory, basically you drill right through the metal-rubber-metal sandwich.
    A bolt is threaded into one of the metals and backed up with a thin nut, hole through other two layers is drilled out very slightly for a free fit on bolt shank. I don't remember direction, which is controlled by where there is enough room...
    Head of bolt gets enough air gap to allow normal mount function li light driving, bottoms out immediately when serious torque happens. Normal vibration control remains.
     
  6. SimonSez
    Joined: Jul 1, 2001
    Posts: 1,632

    SimonSez
    Member

    Yep, did this years ago on a SBC and it worked good. There is a core plug right behind the engine mount which gives room for the bolt (or was that the nut - it was that long ago I can't remember which way round I put it).



     
  7. SinisterCustom
    Joined: Feb 18, 2004
    Posts: 8,268

    SinisterCustom
    Member

    I used a turnbuckle with a few links of chain on either side.....it's not adjusted tight....just a tad of slack. Just enough to keep the engine from tearing up driver's side motor mount. Big blocks in heavy cars tend to eat mounts....lol.
     
  8. mastergun1980
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 1,095

    mastergun1980
    Member
    from Alva OK

    Ummm..Be carefull when I was a kid I kept breaking motor mounts on mu 67 mustang , so I made a3/8 log chain " torque limiter " and had it tight.... I ended up twisting the subframe up pretty bad, so make sure you have plenty of meat and chassis rigidity before you limit the torque...
     
  9. CutawayAl
    Joined: Aug 3, 2009
    Posts: 2,144

    CutawayAl
    Member
    from MI

    The average street car, and especially older ones, twist and flex a lot. With solid mounts that can break things, even the block. On top of that, having one solid mount where the others are flexible can cause problems too.
     
  10. lukey
    Joined: May 27, 2009
    Posts: 668

    lukey
    Member

    It's a 302 in a 58 ford custom 300. The motor is not wild, just a basic 280-300hp/325 ft-lb I'm guessing, maybe a tad more...I'm using 84 mustang frame mounts. The only reason I need to limit the torque, is because I want to keep the three on the tree shifter. The problem, is when I wind it out I can't hit 2nd gear...the shift rods bind up. I can granny shift it, but that sucks! Because its not a wild motor I figured the solid mount on 1 side would be ok, but not sure. Thanks guys!



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    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  11. yellow dog
    Joined: Oct 15, 2011
    Posts: 416

    yellow dog
    Member
    from san diego

    My first thought is that you are asking a lot from your column shifters long thin rods and bushings (old or new)
     
  12. lukey
    Joined: May 27, 2009
    Posts: 668

    lukey
    Member

    I think they will be ok, especially since it won't be driven very hard very often.


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  13. SimonSez
    Joined: Jul 1, 2001
    Posts: 1,632

    SimonSez
    Member

    If you are using Mustang mounts chances are you can get a urethane version.
    Maybe that will limit the movement enough without being too harsh?

    Is this the right style?

    http://www.energysuspensionparts.com/proddetail.asp?prod=4.1122

    If they are that style, looks like you could stop them separating too much by running a bolt through them like Bruce suggested also.



     
  14. Heo2
    Joined: Aug 9, 2011
    Posts: 661

    Heo2
    Member

    when you depress the clutch
    to shift the torque don twist
    the engine what preassure
    plate do you got?maby to
    heavy centrifugal wheights
     
  15. lukey
    Joined: May 27, 2009
    Posts: 668

    lukey
    Member

    If I granny shift, it's not a problem, I can't speed shift it (yes, it can be done on a column shifter) the torque from cranking the motor up doesn't allow the motor to settle fast enough for the shift rods to be in place without binding. The pressure plate is a heavy duty stock replacement for a 72 f100 with a 302 and a 4 speed. It's a diaphragm style. I know I could just go to a floor shifter, but I don't want to. Tomorrow I will get a photo of the driver side of engine bay and it will show why I am having a hard time figuring out placement of a strap. The polyurethane mounts may be what needs done.



    -LUKEY-
     
  16. Thunderroad312
    Joined: Nov 18, 2012
    Posts: 159

    Thunderroad312
    Member

    Two things I have done for this situation. Drill the mount and do the nut and bolt thing. If space is a problem use a countersunk head allen bolt and or tap threads into the actual metal of the mount. Works real well and best of all it's clean looking. Re shift linkage, make some solid bushings to replace the rubber at the top, make sure there is no slop at the bottom. Sometimes the holes in the shift arms need to be resized. Either weld and redrill or ream and put bushings. Hurst floor shift bushings and wire tension clips work well. And last but not least play with the adjustment to favor the 1-2 shift. Sometimes makes getting into reverse a little harder, but you don't have to do that fast.
     
  17. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,005

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    My Morris Minor came out stock with a torque-control device comprising an adjustable rod and some nuts, washers, rubber discs, and brackets. It had all of 49 ft.lbs to deal with, but I'm sure the principle can be put to good use. On the left of the photograph, just ahead of the battery:
    [​IMG]
    (Not my car, this. Mine's a bit rougher around the edges.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  18. Simple, easy thought; 86-93 Mustang Convertible motor mount. Ford made them beefier because the verts were the heaviest fox body platform. Even with a nasty cam, very little vibration transfer to the body. Pretty strong, ran in the high 10's with a coupe with those mounts and no issues. They are a little taller though, about 3/4 inch I think. Make sure that isn't a problem. Draw back is you may have to get them from a dealer if the local shops are only listing one part number.
     
  19. Buzznut
    Joined: May 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,349

    Buzznut
    Member

    One pic out of all of these responses? We need more pics...
     
  20. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    I have broken a few drivers side mounts on sbf engines over the years, they usually separate between the steel and rubber. What I did when I put the 331 in my 27 was that I drilled two holes all the way through the mounts and put two 3/8 bolts and nuts in there. Now the two metal parts are sandwiching the rubber tightly in between them. I used nylock nuts so that I could control how tight I torqued the bolts.

    In 3 years of abusing the 27, even racing it, the mounts are still holding up great.

    Don

    Like so..........

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  21. drptop70ss
    Joined: May 31, 2010
    Posts: 1,148

    drptop70ss
    Member
    from NY

    Solid mount on drivers side only, rubber on the passenger side and the trans, problem solved.
     
  22. Buckster
    Joined: May 3, 2010
    Posts: 228

    Buckster
    Member

    I tied my engine down with a length of cable. The cable does not have to be anything special-the cable used on garage doors will work. I fastened one end to one of the front bolts on the LH cylinder head. Use a long bolt that can be tightened in the tapped hole & leave the shoulder exposed. I went around the bolt's shoulder & connected it with a pair of cable clamps. I was able to connect it the the frame without a turnbuckle. It will work with a little slack.
     

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