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Tool Tech ? = Wayne air compressor

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Powerband, Nov 10, 2007.

  1. Powerband
    Joined: Nov 10, 2004
    Posts: 542

    Powerband

    I recently acquired a Wayne Air Compressor from a friend whose dad had a garage in the 60's.

    It's a two stage compressor with a continuous duty 220 3HP motor. Vertical 60 gal tank.

    > What type oil should be used in the compressor ?.


    > I replaced the old boiler drain type valves with ball valves, all plumbed 1/2" NPT. the regulator has the small 3/8 fittings and may not be original . Are bigger fitting/CFM regulators used generally?. I want to plumb in a 3/4 or 1/2 air line into my shop from the compressor in the attached shed and it doesn't seem to make sense to throttle down the air at the tanks regulator . Am I missing something? .



    > The compressor crank has a small 1/4" tubing setup with a pressure switch or something pressurized from the air tank one way valve. There is a pin in the valve/switch goes straight into the compressor crank bearing support. It tees with a short drain tube. Any clue what this does?, it was disconnected to move it and seems adjustable.


    Thanks
    Powerband:cool:
     
  2. Go to a place that sells compressors, and buy compressor oil. Ordinary motor oil as in the type you would use in your car, has silicone in it. If you use it in your compressor, a certain ammount of oil always migrates past the piston rings and into the compressed air tanks and lines. Then when you try to use the compressor to paint something with, the silicone contamination of the system will cause fish eyes, cratering, and a whole host of problems. Compressor oil has no silicone in it.
     
  3. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,890

    squirrel
    Member

    if there's a 3/8" regulator on it you can remove that and plumb with the size you want, and put the size of regulator you want, where you want it. I don't have a regulator on my air system, the compressor switch is set to 125 or something. I do have a regulator/gage on a quick connect fitting that I can plug in before an air hose if I need to cut the pressure down for whatever reason.

    pictures would help
     
  4. MEDDLER1
    Joined: Jun 1, 2006
    Posts: 1,590

    MEDDLER1
    Member

    Use Only 30 Weight Non Detergent Oil In The Pump,as For The Regulator You Shouldnt Need It Unless You Are Operating A Tool Thats Needs A Really Low Pressure Like Say 65-80 Psi As For The Lines On The Pump It Probably Had A Valve Set Up For Continuous Run Alot Of Old Units Had These Features.you Could Probably Omit It Altogether And Run A Straight Pressure Switch With A Blow Down.just Make Sure Those Lines Are Not For A Pressurized Oiling System Because They Had Those As Well.one Clue Is An External Oil Filter And Oil Pressure Gauge.if Those Are Not There You Should Be Fine.i Install Compressed Air Systems For A Living,depending On How Old I May Be Able To Get You More Info On The Unit If You Have A Pump Model And Serial.hope This Helps.
     

  5. Powerband
    Joined: Nov 10, 2004
    Posts: 542

    Powerband

    So now I get that I can just install the regulator at a drop I want to be able to lower . Like the bicycle tire / pool toy filler area...


    I noticed that the sweated copper lines in a truck tire garage I was in, was using 1/2" throughout..

    I opened the 2" bung to shop vac a layer of crud in the bottom and to eyeball tank condition. Appears solid but I was a little nervous first time I let it go to full pressure valve shut-off. Switch is -ON @ 150 - OFF @ 175. Guage reads @ 180 at full pressure.



    Here's a few pics:





    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Storage overhang closed in with pine fencing. My garage is on inside:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Still wondering purpose of the pressurized small line to head
     
  6. 30# non-detergent oil and use the good stuff from napa it does make a difference.
     
  7. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,748

    stealthcruiser
    Member

    I think that plumbing stuff to the crankcase/end of the crankshaft area you asked about is part of an "unloader" system.

    As in when it shuts down,relieves the pressure on top of and below the piston,so it will not start under a load.
     
  8. Powerband
    Joined: Nov 10, 2004
    Posts: 542

    Powerband

    Thanks,

    I need to figure out how that "unloader" setup works to relieve compression on startup. . The fitting into the compressor was removed for transport and I haven't yet figured out how the compressor fitting with the pin is adjusted.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    The advice on running without the regulator sounds simple, but can the working pressure of 175 PSI be used safely with most airtools?. I just thought the 3/8" regulator fittings would "choke" the supply on this big compressor. The pressure switch is marked 175-OFF / 150-ON, is there adjustment to bring it down if I run unregulated or would I need to replace the switch?.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks again,

    Powerband :cool:
     
  9. putedly
    Joined: Jan 24, 2008
    Posts: 1

    putedly
    Member
    from indiana

    I was wondering if you might be able to help me out with identifying a wayne compressor I have. It looks identical to the one you have pictured. The only number I can find on it is on the crankcase and it is most likely a part number. It is AC-4272. If this is the same as the number on your pump I would greatly appreciate a reply. Thanks!
     
  10. dave lewis
    Joined: Dec 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,373

    dave lewis
    Member
    from Nampa ID

    First of all, the unloader is adjustable. remove the small lines and loosen the jam nut ( right where the "tee" screws into the end of the crankcase).. spin the tee one full turn in , tighten the jam nut,hook the lines back up and test..you may have to go the other direction..depends on where its set at now..
    next, yes ..the pressure switch is adjustable. but..only about 15 or 20 psi up or down from the specs on the switch..
    Truth be told unless you are running your tools right off the tank you will not see 175 psi.. by the time it runs thru your supply plumbing and then the hoses it will be greatly reduced.(line loss).
    check the psi at the end of the line. you might not need to worry about it !
    Dave :)
    P.S. the unloader works on shut down, not start up.. when the pressure switch kills the power and the motor slows to a stop you should hear a small pshoosh.(think semi setting the parking brake)
     
  11. mcthomas
    Joined: Jul 19, 2009
    Posts: 3

    mcthomas
    Member

    I also have this same style compressor..
    Model# 62212-SV
    Serial# ME-48735
    On the Side of the Motor is: AC-4272

    The tube going to the side of the crank case comes from the top of the cylinder head.
    It is a pressure bleed off of some sort. As soon as the compressor cuts out and stops, it releases a breath of pressure, then sits waiting to kick in again.

    Today, when it cut off, it kept releasing air pressure from the tank, until the tank was empty. I tapped on everything, thinking maybe a piece of trash got somewhere it did not belong, but nothing helped.
    I read what you said about loosening the nut, and turning the "T". I am going to try that tomorrow, but it just started doing this, after several years of semi occasional use. At least not every day use.

    I am heart broken.. I love the old thing.
    Any comments?

    Is there some part that breaks, or wears out to cause this?

    What would cause this thing to keep releasing air?

    My compressor is the same as this one, as far as the 1/4" lines, but, the feed lines come from on top of the cylinder head, rather than the one way valve that the picture here shows.

    Thanks.
    Mark Thomas.
     
  12. gas pumper
    Joined: Aug 13, 2007
    Posts: 2,957

    gas pumper
    Member

    There's a check valve where the compressor line enters the storage tank.
    Sometimes it's one with the fitting. This keeps the tank pressure off the head when the compressor unloads. If it leaks back, the valve is bad.

    Common item at Graingers, etc
     
  13. mcthomas
    Joined: Jul 19, 2009
    Posts: 3

    mcthomas
    Member

    You were right. There was a check valve in a 1" to 3/4" reducer. It was being held open by at least one piece of metal that was stuck in the valve. I removed it, and it is working, but I am feeling pretty bad about the metal pieces that I have found. I am sure they do not belong there.
    I did adjust the needle valve back to its original setting. When the motor stops spinning, the lack of centrifugal force releases some part on the side of the compressor housing to push the pin, and release the pressure.
    All is working correctly now, but what in the world are these metal pieces?
    [​IMG]
     
  14. chitbox dodge
    Joined: Apr 25, 2005
    Posts: 598

    chitbox dodge
    Member
    from dunlap tn

    it's an unloader. basically its designed to unload all the cylinder pressure that might be in the pump portion of your compressor while its sitting there. its soul purpose in life is to make start-ups easy. its like an old style compression release mechanism on a tractor or motorbike or something, but only automatic.

    the way it works is:

    at start up when the motor kicks on the compressor spins which builds oil pressure. it spins while the unloader air side uses an operator to hold open the intake valve to each cylinder. this is "usually" accomplished by spring tension in the operator.

    once oil pressure gets to a preset level, say 25 psi or so, its oil side closes. which allows the unloader to close which allows the compressor to build air pressure then.

    if youre having trouble building air pressure its most likey:

    a) if you hear air escaping its likely a blown diaphram .

    b) underneath the diaphram it may be a stuck (like rusty) or busted actuator or intake valve.

    c) if you dont hear air escaping then it may very well be the oil side (sense side) of the unloader. they can get dirty and stick.

    hope that helps.
     
  15. mcthomas
    Joined: Jul 19, 2009
    Posts: 3

    mcthomas
    Member

    Excellent explanation.. Thanks. I can tell you have been inside a few of these.. Thanks.
    The unloader is working properly now. After I adjusted it back where it should have been.

    Actually, everything works properly. These 4 pieces of the previous picture were all down around this one way valve. One of the pieces held the valve open. It is why the compressor fully leaked down, not just the pressure in the compressor itself.
    When I pulled it out, put it back together, all works fine.

    I am curious about what this metal piece is/was? It had to come out of the second stage, or pass from first to second, then to the tank's one way valve. It is hard to believe that the compressor does not need this, but it works anyway.

    Can you tell what this is? or,, do you know where to buy a kit to rebuild this if it is going to break further? I love this old guy.. He has been with me for a very long time, and I have moved him more than once.. Once with a fork lift, the rest of the times, raw muscle and ingeniuity..
    thanks.
     
  16. Landmyne
    Joined: Jun 14, 2009
    Posts: 4

    Landmyne
    Member

    I was just given a wayne compressor which I will be moving today. I don't know if it runs yet so I'm sure I will be neeeding all of your expertise. What does the pressurized oiling system look like? This has a weird contraption off of one of the hoses that are there that has a cylinder and a regulator on it. Is this for dding oil in the line or something else?
     
  17. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,400

    MP&C
    Member

    For the oil, Mobil Rarus 427.
     
  18. motodg22
    Joined: Mar 9, 2010
    Posts: 2

    motodg22
    Member
    from Tennessee

    I have almost the same compressor. Mine is a 6000 series like this one. Only difference is the brass valve on mine has three connections. Looks like moving the T in and out is how to adjust it. Not sure what adjusting does though. Mine has a second tube that goes in at the intake part of the manifold. I just bought a rebuild kit for mine and replaced all rings, gaskets, seals, and the valves. Cut slots in a socket to get the valves in and out. Know that its all back together when i turn it on it starts blowing air out of the blow off on the intake manifold before it gets pumped up all the way. The blow off is a 115 psi, when tank pressure gets to that level it starts leaking. Anyone know why that is, could i have put the valves in wrong. Tried to use common since when putting them back in, cause a friend took them out and does not remember. Would love to have a diagram.
     
  19. motodg22
    Joined: Mar 9, 2010
    Posts: 2

    motodg22
    Member
    from Tennessee

    Went back to check mine. It has the same tubing as yours, just that the little housing that the tubing is in, mine has a fitting on the top of the housing as well that runs to the intake manifold. Sorry for the confusion. Help would be appreciated.
     
  20. My buddy Louie S. got one of them big old bad-ass compressors, and it is adjusted to shut off at 148#. We plumbed his shop with 3/4" to 1/2" pvc and hooked everything up, first thing that happened is the hose reels started leaking real bad, I guess there's an O-ring where they spin. Anyway they can't take the pressure. So he found a 3/4" regulator that we will install right out of the tank, that and some new reels (or repairs) and we should be fine.

    And as far as line drop goes, this only happens when you are using the air faster than it can come down the line.

    100# is enough, and with more in the tank you should be able to do anything you want and not run out of air.
     
  21. Landmyne
    Joined: Jun 14, 2009
    Posts: 4

    Landmyne
    Member

    I have a wayne 376 2 stage compressor serial # 99858. How long should it take this compressor to to reach 100 psi? There is a pressure switch off of the side which currently not operational. Does anyone know how to hook it back up? I can send pictures if needed. Thank you!
     
  22. Tim95139
    Joined: Nov 20, 2019
    Posts: 1

    Tim95139

    I have a line on a Wayne Compressor that I am picking up this week. Unfortunately the owner knows nothing about it, and I haven't been able to find any manuals online. Anyone know the specs on a Wayne model 398-2V compressor? It looks like the tank has to be around 100 Gallons, and it must weight a freakin ton. Really curious what the PSI, SCFM, and weight of it is so I k ow what to expect.

    Thanks
     
  23. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,748

    stealthcruiser
    Member

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