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Tool idea- powering a bead roller.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by fbama73, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. fbama73
    Joined: Jul 12, 2008
    Posts: 990

    fbama73
    Member

    Well, it's starting to look like another project car seller has flaked out on me, so I may not be getting the 51 Chevy coupe.

    I need to be contributing something useful to this forum. I was reading in the '59 El Camino build thread about needing two people to bead roll panels. My metalshaping buddy and I took a Harbor Fright bead roller and turned it into something a one armed man can operate by himself.

    First, let me say that we did this on the cheap, mainly because my buddy has a wonderful supply of bits and bobs that he gets for next to nothing at an auction. Duplicating this from stuff you have to go out and buy could get kind of pricey.

    But, I'm sharing this because it might trigger something off in someone. Someone will find a way to make it work with stuff they have, others will be keeping an eye out for materials on the cheap, and someone else will take our idea a step or two farther and make it better.

    [​IMG]

    We started with a HF bead roller, and made a frame for it out of thickwall 2x2 square tubing. The frame stiffens the unit a bit, and also eliminates the need to fasten it in a vise. We mounted a 3/4hp DC motor and controller (110V) to a 60:1 gear reduction, and drove the bead roller via sprockets and chain.

    [​IMG]

    Now, if you go to an industrial supplier to buy this stuff new, they're going to bend you over on price. However, at industrial auctions, you can sometimes pick it up for less than scrap price.

    [​IMG]

    The black box toward the middle on top is our directional switch. It's detented in the center (off) position. Because of the detent, you have to push the switch twice to change direction. This way, changing direction, you actually turn it off before you turn it around. The 110V supply is run through a foot switch, allowing you to keep your hands on the work. The controller turns down slow enough that one can follow an intricate pattern.

    I'm sure these ideas have been done before, and I'm sure there are better ideas. But this one works.
     
  2. fitzee
    Joined: Feb 26, 2003
    Posts: 2,863

    fitzee
    Member

    That interesting. Like the idea of running both ways.
     
  3. Dammit
    Joined: Sep 10, 2008
    Posts: 79

    Dammit
    Member
    from Canada

    fbama73, this is a H.F. bead roller that I powered with an electric power steering motor, a S.B.C. flywheel and starter drive, and, a 12 V. battery.
    The stand is maded from a '78 Chev van tank bracket and assorted warehouse racks.
    Direction is changed with 2 starter switces and 4 relays.
     

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  4. fbama73
    Joined: Jul 12, 2008
    Posts: 990

    fbama73
    Member

    ^ NICE!!! I also like the stiffening ribs. I see you ditched the adjustment knob for a crank, too.
     

  5. Dammit
    Joined: Sep 10, 2008
    Posts: 79

    Dammit
    Member
    from Canada

    The whole thing was built on a very tight budget, with a lot of scrounging and adapting of things that were laying in my various goodie piles. The drive gear cover is a '68 Ford breather. That crank is an old ratchet handle, a big washer, and, a 7/16" bolt with a 1/4" ball captured in the end. Glad you like it.
     
  6. fbama73
    Joined: Jul 12, 2008
    Posts: 990

    fbama73
    Member

    ^ When you build something for next to nothing from stuff lying around, that makes it even better!

    Heck, we built a helve hammer out of a industrial box stapler that cost two bucks at an auction, but that's a story for another time. Another time which will come soon if I come across anymore flaky sellers. Two straight cars, I have money i9n hand, and the seller flakes out. Sheesh!
     
  7. frankinplymouth
    Joined: Sep 6, 2008
    Posts: 354

    frankinplymouth
    Member
    from oregon

    My HF power roller from junk parts, works great. Grainger variable speed foot pedal to run it.
     

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    Beau likes this.
  8. Please forgive my naïveté, but what the hell is a bead roller?
     
  9. BudJ63
    Joined: May 3, 2009
    Posts: 69

    BudJ63
    Member
    from Florida

    LOL Most "HAMB'rs would have done a Google search for "Bead Roller". Now you have some "HAMB"rs googling "naivete" :D

    Nice ingenuity on the home made powered rollers.
     
  10. xix32
    Joined: Jun 12, 2008
    Posts: 486

    xix32
    Member

    this seems like a very dangerous "improvement".
    especially with the foot switch version, now it's possible to roll both of your fingers/hands through the rollers.
    pretty unlikely that would happen while turning the feed wheel by hand.
     
  11. raidmagic
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,438

    raidmagic
    Member

    Well you have to use common sense and be careful while using any power tools so this really is no different. Possible to get hurt using it? Sure but it's possible to be hurt when using your car do you still do that?
     

  12. LOL, yeah power tools are dangerous.

    In all my years of operating my own powered bead roller, never once have I had my fingers near the rollers. I'm more concerned about controlling the panel at it's extremities than fondling the beading wheels.

    You should probably steer clear of power hammers and most certainly stay away from those finger snatching "English Wheels"

    ;)
     
    samuelscreech likes this.
  13. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 17,801

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California


    I've noticed the same danger with my table saw. I am going to remove the motor and put a big crank on it instead.:confused:
     
    samuelscreech likes this.
  14. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,237

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yeah,

    If the liberal safety police see this, they'll find a way to make it safe. (and make it ineffectual at the same time!) Trust OSHA. They're here to help you.
     
  15. metalshapes
    Joined: Nov 18, 2002
    Posts: 10,743

    metalshapes
    Tech Editor


    Not sure about that...

    Some people are pretty uncoordinated.

    Its probably best to sit on your hands, and do nothing at all...
     
    Beau likes this.
  16. hugh m
    Joined: Jul 18, 2007
    Posts: 2,142

    hugh m
    Member
    from ct.

    Here's an antique Niagra bead roller set up with a DC Variable speed drive assembly I got from a plating line shaker. Used to have a Pexto 622 on it , but the old stuff is so much nicer...Guess the safety police guy has never worked in a sheet metal shop, or any where else for that matter.
     

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  17. Bead Roller....used to destroy a perfectly good piece of metal....
    or when used properly, adds stiffening ridges in metal
    panels, sometimes just for looks...
     

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  18. Do you know that Guy who pulled the trigger on his mig welder while listening for gas flow and poked a hole in his ear drum? Sounds like lots in common.

    You could get really fucked up in the kitchen too.
     
  19. i wear a face shield, helmet, approved resperator, chest protecter, chaps, and knights gloves with full gauntlet...and then i farm the job out. can't be too careful.
     
  20. 60 GASSER
    Joined: Sep 26, 2007
    Posts: 530

    60 GASSER
    Member

    old sewing machine motor with foot control works great! second hand store here we come.
     
  21. HotRod33
    Joined: Oct 5, 2008
    Posts: 2,340

    HotRod33
    Member
    from MO

    I am always careful with my bead roller I have a buddy hold the panel and I run the switch that way I can mash his fingers and not mine......
     
    68Dodge likes this.

  22. CRIPES...... I just about shot yogurt out of my nose..... cut that out!!!
     
  23. UnIOnViLLEHauNT
    Joined: Jun 22, 2004
    Posts: 4,824

    UnIOnViLLEHauNT
    Member

    Hahaha, that made me lol crazy amounts.

    So...I have a few electric motors I have moved from shop to shop, now to our new house. I think they were originally polisher motors, fasty spinny types. Can I do something with these? Is a motor a motor a motor? I was thinking while looking at a sewing machine pedal if I could throw that sucka in the mix. Arent those pretty much resistors? I have a bead roller from there that I "improved" and I think I made it worse. Time to either redo it, farm out my beads, buy a quality roller or stop buying cars that need all new floors.
     
  24. JOECOOL
    Joined: Jan 13, 2004
    Posts: 2,757

    JOECOOL
    Member

    not trying to steal your thread but I converted an old table saw table and a gear reduction motor ( 15 rpm) with some bicycle chain to slow it down even more. work great ,with the gear reduction it doesn't take much power to turn it.[​IMG]

    Uploaded with ImageShack.us

    [​IMG]
    Shot at 2011-04-12
     
    kmc777 likes this.
  25. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 10,625

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    Is the table a good idea ? seems to me it might get in the way in some cases ?
     
  26. Snickern
    Joined: Sep 1, 2009
    Posts: 46

    Snickern
    Member
    from Norway

    I allways make sure the grinder isnt pluged in, I just move it quickly forward/bacwards so i dont risk geting any sparks behind my glasses,
     
  27. hugh m
    Joined: Jul 18, 2007
    Posts: 2,142

    hugh m
    Member
    from ct.

    Seems like a real creative use for most jobs, and looks like the old saw carriage slides out the front? I've made tons of things like this, maybe half work out really well, but if you don't try it , ya got nothin...that's why these threads are interesting.
     
  28. 49, that some funny shit there, I use my drill motor the old fashion way by spinning it fast I can with the palm of my hand kinda like spinning the tires on your bysicle when you have it upside down on the bars and seat. All this time I thought the bits were dull, to afraid to plug it in.:D

    ok, nuff jokin around, Hey bama, you should save that for tech week
     
  29. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,289

    swissmike
    Member

    I think the only time the table got in the way if you want to run a panel which is not flat. I could see it being very helpful when doing flat panels. It's a great setup!
     
  30. I like the table saw too, sure makes it easy to controll a large flat piece.
     

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