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Technical Tomorrow starts the tail panel repair.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Do it Over, Apr 9, 2021.

  1. brading
    Joined: Sep 9, 2019
    Posts: 436

    brading
    Member

    Must say you made a top job of that panel seeeing what it was like to start with.
     
    Do it Over likes this.
  2. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 442

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    Why ?
     
    chryslerfan55 likes this.
  3. choptop40
    Joined: Dec 23, 2009
    Posts: 4,010

    choptop40
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    been done to death....looks smoother without...like it attached to the bumper...just my 2 cents
     
    Do it Over likes this.
  4. ems customer service
    Joined: Nov 15, 2006
    Posts: 2,582

    ems customer service
    Member

    GOOD WORK--- THE EMS GUY
     
    Do it Over likes this.
  5. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 442

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    Getting there slowly. It would have been much faster and easier to use the EMS trunk floor but I'm enjoying the experience of welding up my own patch. I used the roof filler panel that I removed from the car as it was 18 ga. It looks kinda funky but it'll work and no one will see it.
    A few more bracing plates to weld in, some triming and the patch will be welded in. Next I'll repair the bottom of the spare tire bracket, weld it in and bolt the patch down. Then starts the floor flanges and wheel well patches.
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    Last edited: May 17, 2021
    Squablow, brEad, reagen and 4 others like this.
  6. choptop40
    Joined: Dec 23, 2009
    Posts: 4,010

    choptop40
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Suggestion ....you could use a panel flanger on the flatter areas of the upper body...ive had great luck with that ..unless your gonna butt weld it....
     
  7. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 442

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    Good suggestion, I've flanged a lot of panels but I'm aiming to TIG butt weld this one. Time to force myself into improving my skills
     
  8. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 442

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    Back at it after too long. Seems all that shrinking can really move a panel in a linear plane as well. That's my explanation for the 1/4" plus tapered gap I now have at the bottom of the cut. I fitted and refitted the panel nearly a hundred times and did notice the gap increasing as the panel got to the smooth stage. My solution will be to cut a wedge to fill the gap and weld it in once the other patch work is all done and the complete panel is ready to weld back in. I was tempted to cut it right down the middle and fill it there but figure that would be much harder to do as it would create more warping. All the cleco holes were drilled before any spot welds were drilled out or any cuts made to ensure the panel went back in place.

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  9. Happydaze
    Joined: Aug 21, 2009
    Posts: 1,173

    Happydaze
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    When you're done nobody will ever know, as long as you don't tell them! Ha ha.

    Welding in a very thin sliver like that is really difficult. The filler piece can overheat and melt away and as that's happening the natural reaction, well my natural reaction, is to add more filler to try and catch it, which involves further heat and then, even if successful, results in large globs of weld requiring mucho attention before finishing, and, more crucially, the excess heat warps it all to hell and back, requiring yet more work. A solution to this, whilst sounding counter intuitive, is to cut the gap wider, to about an inch, and cut filler pieces to suit, which won't be troublesome like the thin sliver. Overall quicker, easier, and more likely to achieve a pleasing outcome.

    Enjoying the ride, observing your progress!

    Chris
     
    anothercarguy and Do it Over like this.
  10. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 4,274

    Fortunateson
    Member

    I agree with Happydaze. However I've seen guys fill those kind of gaps with welding rod. How good of welder are you?
     
  11. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 442

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    Depends on who you compare me to ;)
     
    chiro, loudbang and brEad like this.
  12. Hit it to close the gap a little more, hit it hard on both sides and it'll be right to weld. JW
     
    redoxide and loudbang like this.
  13. Jacksmith
    Joined: Sep 24, 2009
    Posts: 693

    Jacksmith
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Impressive work & patience... Perseverance furthers.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  14. Squablow
    Joined: Apr 26, 2005
    Posts: 15,355

    Squablow
    Member

    Interesting and a little shocking to see that much gap open up from working the sheetmetal that much.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  15. redoxide
    Joined: Jul 7, 2002
    Posts: 624

    redoxide
    Member
    from Scotland

    to fill the gap, find yourself a good solid dolly that will fit the contour of the body from inside.

    With a good chisel end panel hammer ( not sharp like a chisel but shaped like a chisel with a flat or rounded edge) hit the panel ON DOLLY with a forward strike motion about a 1/4 to 1/2 inch away from the edge.

    This will stretch the metal and at the same time, push / move it forward to close the gap.

    Spread the load between the tail and the body and you will find a gap that size will close easy . Try not to strike on the edge as you dont want to make the panel to thin where you intend to butt weld it . Occasionally you might need to tap the edge but try not to beat on it ..

    If you concentrate on small areas starting from the small gap, closing it and tacking it a safe distance from where it begins to widen, you will find that the gap will start to close of its own accord due to the localised heat in the small tacks , reducing the amount you will need to work it to close the widest part . Tap tap , tack, tap tap, tack, tap tap tak and so on, it will close easy without the need to bump in lots of heat and filler rod ..

    You have the ability to do it having looked at what you have achieved with the damaged tail pan.. Great attitude to push yourself to improve your skills , With that mind set your all good .
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2021
    Do it Over likes this.
  16. What’s it look like if you release the clecos and fit the joint then practice tack the joint or tab and Cleco the joint?
    I’m thinking the support structure of the tail panel could have been tweaked by the skin damage. You’ve corrected the damage on the skin but not correct the tweaks in the support structure yet . Just a thought
     

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