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Technical Tin Snips

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Mike Colemire, Jul 5, 2020.

  1. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,236

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    What is a good brand of tin snips that will last? I have around 10 pair and none of them are worth a crap, some of them weren't cheap. I watched a video on installing patch panels and the guy had a pair that he was cutting 18 gauge like it was paper and the edges still looked good when he was done. Anyone got any ideas from experience?
     
  2. quickchangeV8
    Joined: Dec 7, 2010
    Posts: 384

    quickchangeV8
    Member

    Lee Valley Tools. A pair of tin snips from Lee Valley Tools that are made in Germany will likely last you a very long time. Very high quality, but with anything that is high quality, the price will also be high.
     
  3. sloppy jalopies
    Joined: Jun 29, 2015
    Posts: 4,187

    sloppy jalopies
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I had the same problem, bought a nibbler, I removes a 1/4" strip and leaves a nice edge...
    about $50, worth every penny... would buy another tomorrow .
     
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  4. Firedup
    Joined: Feb 2, 2018
    Posts: 141

    Firedup
    Member
    from Oregon

    I do sheet metal work by trade. There are no tin snips that will cut 18ga like paper. Yes they will cut 18ga., even 16 ga., but likely need to use both hands and squeeze like your life depended on it. We use offset greens and reds, Midwest brand, on a daily basis. They will cut 20 ga. and lighter like paper.
     

  5. ClarkH
    Joined: Jul 21, 2010
    Posts: 951

    ClarkH
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've had very good luck with Wiss brand snips. The snips on the left are older Wiss "Metalmaster" series and are absolutely excellent. The ones on the right are newer and decent, but not as nice. All of these came from garage sales for around $1 each.
    IMG_2181.JPG
     
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  6. Firedup
    Joined: Feb 2, 2018
    Posts: 141

    Firedup
    Member
    from Oregon

    Also a good pair of double cuts come in handy and some are good up to 14ga.
     
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  7. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,346

    The37Kid
    Member

    Tin snips, I thought the thin cut off wheels replaced them, TV shows lying to us? :confused:

    Bob
     
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  8. Firedup
    Joined: Feb 2, 2018
    Posts: 141

    Firedup
    Member
    from Oregon

    Midwest brand are better than Wiss. Wiss used to be a good brand. They always loosen up and have to be tightened. Other than that, I would say Wiss takes second. Midwest brand are the same as the old craftsman brand.
     
  9. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,236

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    I have an electric nibbler and every size of cutting wheels you can think of. I'd just like to have a good set for small pieces that didn't destroy the edges of the metal. Small curves are easier to cut with them compared to a cutting wheel, I just came in and washed off ton of grit from them. Being 90 some degrees out doesn't help.
     
  10. I have had Wiss snips for many years ( like 40) and they are still good.
     
  11. Make sure you are only trying to cut off a small amount. Tin snips are not meant to cut a 1/2" strip of metal off they are meant for fine trimming to a final cut line. I use a cheapy electric shear to get my cut close to the line and then finish trim with tin snips and have never had much issue even with cheaper ones.

    Sent from my SM-G950W using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  12. ClarkH
    Joined: Jul 21, 2010
    Posts: 951

    ClarkH
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You want to go crazy, get a Beverly Shear. Man, they are nice.
    BevShear.jpg
     
  13. yep the beverly is the best way. IMG_0379.JPG
     
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  14. 51504bat
    Joined: May 22, 2010
    Posts: 2,160

    51504bat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've got the standard Wiss, Straights, Rights, and Lefts but in addition I have these that I got at a yard sale for a buck each. snip.jpg snip1.jpg snip2.jpg snip3.jpg
     
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  15. these are the pair I posted. I have never had problems cutting 18 gage one handed and never just small cuts. these cut through the center of a sheet easily. note test piece will not fit into 19 gage slot. IMG_0374.JPG
    IMG_0375.JPG IMG_0376.JPG IMG_0378.JPG had a harder time taking the photo left handed then cutting that piece up
     
  16. topher5150
    Joined: Feb 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,071

    topher5150
    Member

    I bought a pair from Menards and they've been working pretty good with 18g

    Sent from my moto z4 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  17. 0NE BAD 51 MERC
    Joined: Nov 12, 2010
    Posts: 1,368

    0NE BAD 51 MERC
    Member

    Actually Milwaukee makes some very nice cutting snips. Work full time as a finish carpenter and on a lot of the apartment complex's we build the unit entrance doors use a three piece metal frame that is at least 18 gauge and some times need to be trimed for floor elevation and they work excellent for that. bought some for the hot rod shop and now all the different style wiss that I have spend a lot of time in the tool box, use them for many ,many years but am really impressed with the Milwaukee ones. Of course I bought them three years ago , so the ones now might be cheap junk like everything else!:rolleyes::rolleyes: Larry
     
  18. flatford39
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 2,675

    flatford39
    Member

    Wis and Malco...that is what the pros use.
     
  19. fastcar1953
    Joined: Oct 23, 2009
    Posts: 2,229

    fastcar1953
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'm also in the hvac trade. We use malco.
     
  20. cornfieldcustoms
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 863

    cornfieldcustoms
    Member

    I use Midwest brand snips daily cutting 19 and 18 Guage. All body panels are finish trimmed with hand snips 880F462D-F690-48EB-836B-8A7151CC5EEA.jpeg
     
  21. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,870

    alchemy
    Member

    I think the key is using them the right way. As a few have said, you need to make sure you aren't cutting a couple inches off and hoping for a zero gap joint. Do the heavy cutting and try to get it about a quarter inch overlap. Then scribe the line and use your (insert favorite brand here) offset shears to get right on that line.

    You definitely need a left and a right, and many times I've used both on trimming the same panel. A straight shear is basically good for cutting the short end off a long strip. And trimming my grinder discs when they get dull.

    I've personally had Wiss that were bought at Menards and they are pretty good for a while. But I'm sure the higher dollar shears have got to be better. I do have a B-2 Beverly Shear but it hardly gets used. I just find it easier to maneuver the panel with the hand shears on my bench rather than through the Beverly.
     
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  22. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,881

    squirrel
    Member

    I think I got my Wiss snips about 30 years ago, I treat them well, keep them oiled, etc, and they worked fine for me today.
     
  23. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,236

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    Finish cutting is what I meant, cut it close with a wheel and then trim it with snips, like the 4 rounded corners on my 33 plymouth sedan top insert.
     
  24. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,236

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    tb33, that is what I'm talking about, something you can trim with without both hands and 1 foot to do it.
     
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  25. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,236

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    Home Depot handles Wiss.
     
  26. they bought a set of these at harbor freight for the shop.......I tried to cut one little piece out ... IMG_0380.JPG never finished. broke all three center bolts
     
  27. 38mag
    Joined: Jun 6, 2005
    Posts: 256

    38mag
    Member

    Midwest offsets, and never,never cut wire with your tin snips.
     
  28. stanlow69
    Joined: Feb 21, 2010
    Posts: 4,654

    stanlow69
    Member
    from red oak

    I bought a Bosch 1500A electric shear for about $325 30 years ago. It is basically a smaller version of a Beverly shear. No 1/4 inch strip of metal to waste either. Mines well worn so it won`t cut 18 gauge, but it does cut heavy waterproof door panel board. Use it weekly.
     
  29. 31Apickup
    Joined: Nov 8, 2005
    Posts: 2,321

    31Apickup
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I use Wiss, most are garage sale finds, all work good. Have a pair of Stanley which don’t work well, should toss those.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     

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