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TIG welding rust holes

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 71buickfreak, Dec 7, 2010.

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  1. 71buickfreak
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 609

    71buickfreak
    Member
    from Oklahoma

    I have a few pinholes in the doors on my wagon, I have been thinking about firing up the new TIG to try my hand at filing these holes. These are really small holes and getting to the backside will be a challenge. What do you guys think? I do realize that cutting out the offending section would be the best solution, but there is a time issue that simply does not allow for it.
    I just got the TIG, and I kind of just want to try it out!
     
  2. Hyway Hauler
    Joined: Aug 31, 2009
    Posts: 670

    Hyway Hauler
    Member

  3. Francisco Plumbero
    Joined: May 6, 2010
    Posts: 2,533

    Francisco Plumbero
    Member
    from il.

    A nice test for your skills, you could try putting some brass or copper on the back as a stop so you can fill easier.
     
  4. 71buickfreak
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 609

    71buickfreak
    Member
    from Oklahoma

    yeah, I have some copper spoons for that exact purpose.
     

  5. Gsnickets
    Joined: Mar 22, 2010
    Posts: 164

    Gsnickets
    Member

    I've filled small holes by brazing them before, pretty easy.... but if you have a TIG to try out, more power to ya'
     
  6. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 11,349

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    Tiny rust holes usually mean the surrounding metal will be very thin. You can try but you may find yourself chasing all over thin metal that would be better cut out and replaced in a larger panel.

    As far as time goes, not fixing it right may come back to haunt you later on. There's always time (or should be) to do it right.
     
  7. T Fritz
    Joined: Jul 1, 2010
    Posts: 175

    T Fritz
    Member

    Rust and the TIG welder do not mix. Clean metal with the TIG and rusty with the MIG.

    Fritz
     
  8. 71buickfreak
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 609

    71buickfreak
    Member
    from Oklahoma

    as far doing it again later, that is actually in the plan, to fix it right later, but for now, I have to gloss over it.
     
  9. 71buickfreak
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 609

    71buickfreak
    Member
    from Oklahoma

    And the car has been media blasted, so the metal is clean on the outside, but I know its going to be thin
     
  10. :)Won't work unless you are just trying to make bigger holes and contaminate your tungsten.:)

    Edit... If it's media blasted you will have better luck.
     
  11. 1930FordRod
    Joined: Sep 11, 2009
    Posts: 20

    1930FordRod
    Member
    from Canada, BC

    I watched a TIG video by Ron Covell. Ron used silicon-bronze welding rod to TIG up small pin holes. I just bought some rod today and plan to try it myself
     
  12. KAJRIP
    Joined: Jul 28, 2007
    Posts: 296

    KAJRIP
    Member

    x2 on the silicon-bronze, it's really not that hard you can do it with a little practice.
     
  13. BadassBadger
    Joined: Oct 24, 2010
    Posts: 461

    BadassBadger
    Member
    from wisconsin

    tig will be next to impossible! mig it!
     
  14. Baron
    Joined: Aug 13, 2004
    Posts: 3,604

    Baron
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    x3 on the silicon-bronze. Low heat,flows good, and little warpage from the heat. Impossible to weld any rusty metal with the tig*(for me anyway).
    Could sand blast the area,cut out the rusted area and tig in a new piece, but it is lot more work. Good luck in which ever way you decide to go.
     
  15. inkmunky
    Joined: Jun 29, 2009
    Posts: 537

    inkmunky
    Member

    If you can access the backside you can tig it, though first timers its hard i learned the hard way on sheet metal before i started welding thicker stuff. Use some 0.30-0.35 mig wire to fill the holes. Start out on the material next to the hole to get your arc going holding the filler over the hole move the torch over to the hole as the filler melts feed it in. Have your hammer and dolly handy to keep warpage down while the weld is still hot, sand it down and finish it off.

    Or just zap it with a mig, grind it down and sand it. Just a little bit easier.
     
  16. woodienut
    Joined: Feb 17, 2009
    Posts: 349

    woodienut
    Member
    from So.Cal.

    Fritz,
    What if the rust holes are the size of a Woodie? LOL
    Dale
     
  17. 71buickfreak
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 609

    71buickfreak
    Member
    from Oklahoma

    That's the problem, it will be almost impossible to get to the backside, the doors are really tight, can't get inside there. MIG will blow right through the thin metal.
     
  18. hillbilly4008
    Joined: Feb 13, 2009
    Posts: 2,919

    hillbilly4008
    Member
    from Rome NY

  19. hillbilly4008
    Joined: Feb 13, 2009
    Posts: 2,919

    hillbilly4008
    Member
    from Rome NY

    Are you using a 110v or a 220v MIG? I agree with the MIG blowing holes IF you are using a big welder.

    A 110v welder turned way down will fill the pin holes. Yeah your going to burn through the thin stuff, but eventually you'll get into the thicker material. Once you get there you can go back and fill the holes you made.

    Rust is a pain in the ass, i deal with it almost daily.
     
  20. oldcarfan
    Joined: Jan 7, 2010
    Posts: 315

    oldcarfan
    BANNED
    from missouri

    can you tig aluminum foil?

    becasue the metal around those pin holes will be about that thick, your gonna spend hours chasing holes youll be burning. it will be easier in the long run to cut it out and replace.
     
  21. hillbilly4008
    Joined: Feb 13, 2009
    Posts: 2,919

    hillbilly4008
    Member
    from Rome NY

  22. 71buickfreak
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 609

    71buickfreak
    Member
    from Oklahoma

    The doors are too narrow to get that eastwood tool in there, but I do have a magnetic copper strip from Eastwood that might (stress the might) fit. I have a Miller 211 with autoset, I can run it down to 22 gauge, and it runs on both 110 or 220, but it seems to work a little better in 220. I just got a Miller Diversion 180 TIG machine, it has a similar auto-set feature. I used the same machine at SEMA, first time I had ever TIG'd, and seemed to be pretty simple. It may not have looked like a stack of dimes, there were some nickels and quarters mixed in there, but I thought I might try it for these small holes. There isn't anything much bigger than 1/4", but most of them are 1/16"-1/8".
     
  23. fast30coupe
    Joined: Nov 15, 2009
    Posts: 1,019

    fast30coupe
    Member
    from Illinois

    you can use brazing rod as the filler and file it down nice!
     
  24. ironpile
    Joined: Jul 3, 2005
    Posts: 915

    ironpile
    Member

    Might I suggest dimpling with a ball peen hammer and cutting a small disk of good metal and tigging in small increments and filling it with body filler
     
  25. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 6,071

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    Lotta bad suggestions here, only a couple good ones. Quit fooling around and do it right, cut it out and replace it. Absolutely NO reason not to, if you're TIGing it anyway!
    Almost every time I hear someone say, it's just temporary, it turns out they never get back to it, and it's permanent.
    Probably only take a couple minutes longer to fit up a nice patch, than to chase around ever-growing holes!
    AND the surrounding area is probably thinned out on the backside, as well, and will soon pop through to the outside as soon as you put paint on it!
     
  26. theHIGHLANDER
    Joined: Jun 3, 2005
    Posts: 8,903

    theHIGHLANDER
    Member

    Listen to chopolds. The difference between good and perfect is about 15min. I figure you'll piss away more time than that trying to "save" time. The patch should take maybe an hr to fab up, the welding another 20-30min. Do it right you can skip the bondo too.
     
  27. robleticia
    Joined: Oct 15, 2007
    Posts: 2,497

    robleticia
    Member

    I mig welded a few holes in my car, you are not going to do it withought something on the back side, the hole is just going to get HUGE QUICK! Take the time to cut it out and weld in a new piece. Just my .02
     
  28. 71buickfreak
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 609

    71buickfreak
    Member
    from Oklahoma

    Long story short, I have an article due on a section of the car, I don't have to do anything about the rust holes, I could just primer over them, but I would rather take a few hours and see if I can close them up. There is simply not enough time to go the full resto route, I need two months for that, not two weeks.
     
  29. freeflynstl
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 287

    freeflynstl
    Member

    I'd use the MIG first then fire up the TIG and go over those welds to soften them up and then you can hammer and dolly them a lot easier. The MIG welds are really hard and I've always used the TIG torch to go back and soften them up before I stretch 'em back out.

    Let us know how it goes.

    Andy L. Kaempfer
    St. Louis, MO
     
  30. chaddilac
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 14,004

    chaddilac
    Member

    Do it right!!! it'll blow there just like a mig welder would in those areas!!
     
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