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Technical Thread size?

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by sabre67, Nov 23, 2013.

  1. sabre67
    Joined: Nov 23, 2013
    Posts: 3

    sabre67
    Member

    Hello could anybody help with this question? I have some vintage ET torque thrust aluninum mags probly 60s or 70s,I need to know the thread size of the center cap holes,i have some broken screws i need to remove and need to know the thread size oif these holes Thanks
     
  2. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,792

    tfeverfred
    Member

    [​IMG]

    Can't you get one out and count threads per inch?
     
  3. KRB52
    Joined: Jul 9, 2011
    Posts: 1,018

    KRB52
    Member
    from Conneticut

    Another option would be to remove one and then take it to your local hardware store and check their nut/bolt checking device. Or remove one, take to local hardware store and try some nuts that look to be about the same size. Clean up the threads first, so you get better accuracy (I hate it when someone brings in a rusted up nut/machine screw and wonders why they can only thread a new nut on only a little bit.)
     
  4. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,792

    tfeverfred
    Member

    It's a wonder some hot rods even leave the drive way.
     

  5. dreracecar
    Joined: Aug 27, 2009
    Posts: 3,115

    dreracecar
    Member
    from so-cal

  6. sabre67
    Joined: Nov 23, 2013
    Posts: 3

    sabre67
    Member

    I got the rims with no caps or screws, just wanted to chase the holes with a tap to clean them up and was wondering if anyone knew the size
     
  7. sabre67
    Joined: Nov 23, 2013
    Posts: 3

    sabre67
    Member

  8. Live dangerously - check the size of the hole in the cap and then try the coarse thread tap that goes through there...or drill and tap them up the next size. No one will remember the tap size of some sheet metal screw in a 50 year old mag wheel.

    It's not rocket science - it's learning by trial and eror.
     
  9. bobwop
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 6,098

    bobwop
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    just went through this 2 days ago.

    but didn't have to come to the HAMB to figure it out!
     
  10. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,857

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    x2!!!!!!!!!!
     
  11. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,542

    noboD
    Member

    ouch!
     
  12. JohnEvans
    Joined: Apr 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,883

    JohnEvans
    Member
    from Phoenix AZ

    I've seen a lot of odd thread sizes but 8-24 ?? 8-32 is a standard size ,might be 10-24 OR -10-32. Seriously doubt 8-24.
     
  13. vtx1800
    Joined: Oct 4, 2009
    Posts: 1,244

    vtx1800
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I am with JohnEvans on thread sizes. I've got several electrical crimpers that have threaded holes from 6-?? through 10-32, makes it easy to make 1/2 inch screws out of one inch screws as well as check and clean threads, just one more tool to add to your arsenal of equipment:)
    I've got some old mags with the same issue, doubt that I fight the screws, will just run without caps:) The problem will be that some cobble mechanic will have lost the correct screw at some point and used a sheet metal screw to hold the cap on, good luck then:(
     
  14. briz
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 101

    briz
    Member

    everybody go get the Starrett tap and drill chart out of your toolbox. now check for the 8-24 tap. there isn't one.

    Hilarious, like asking a rookie to get a left handed screwdriver.

    a**hole... ;)
     
  15. rickl
    Joined: Aug 3, 2012
    Posts: 103

    rickl
    Member

  16. Go to the hardware store buy a hand full of 8-32s and a hand full of 10-24s the right length, an 8-32 tap and a 10-24 tap and you'll be equipped to "get er done" It is one or the other. Oh Yeah, buy stainless bolts so they don't rust into the wheels again! and use nickel anti-seize and make sure you get some on the wifes car door handles. LOL (I was kidding, Don't do that last one)
     
  17. So before you Know It Alls post, you might want to get the facts;
    Special Thread Size High-Speed Steel Hand Taps


    [​IMG]





    Find unusual tap thread sizes here. Taps are coated (bright finish) for use on most metals.
    Also Available: Additional sizes from No. 0 to 4". Please ask for 2595A999 and specify tap thread size (diameter and threads per inch); pitch diameter limit; and taper, plug, or bottoming chamfer.

    <TABLE id=RenderableTbl_635208842140610808VBVD class=ItmTbl style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"><THEAD><TR><TH class=ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign></TH><TH class=ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign></TH><TH class=ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign></TH><TH class=ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign></TH><TH class=ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign></TH><TH class=ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign></TH><TH class="ItmTblColHdrPriceInterior ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign ItmTblColSuperHdrDeflt" style="PADDING-LEFT: 3px; PADDING-RIGHT: 22px" colSpan=2>Bottoming


    </TH><TH class="ItmTblColHdrPriceInterior ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign ItmTblColSuperHdrDeflt" style="PADDING-LEFT: 3px; PADDING-RIGHT: 22px" colSpan=2>Plug


    </TH><TH class="ItmTblColHdrEndPrice ItmTblColSuperHdrAlign ItmTblColSuperHdrDeflt" style="PADDING-LEFT: 3px; PADDING-RIGHT: 5px" colSpan=2>Taper


    </TH></TR><TR><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrNoPivotIndent NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px">Tap Thread
    Size
    </TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrSpecInterior NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px">Pitch
    Dia. Limit
    </TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrSpecInterior NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px">No. of
    Flutes
    </TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrSpecInterior NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px">Thread
    Lg.
    </TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrSpecInterior NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px">O'all
    Lg.
    </TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrSpecInterior NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px">Drill
    Size
    </TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdr NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px"></TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrPriceInterior NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 22px">Each</TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdr NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px"></TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrPriceInterior NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 22px">Each</TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdr NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px"></TD><TD class="ItmTblBaseHdrBorderCell ItmTblColBaseHdrEndPrice NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 5px">Each</TD></TR></THEAD><TBODY><TR id=RenderableRow_635208842140766712OHSB><TD class="ItmTblCellIndentPivotNone ItmTblCellSpec ItmTblColSpaceSpec ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 15px; TEXT-INDENT: 0px" data-mcm-prodgrps="1,2,3">8-24</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellSpec ItmTblColSpaceSpec ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 15px; TEXT-INDENT: 0px" data-mcm-prodgrps="1,2,3">H3</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellSpec ItmTblColSpaceSpec ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 15px; TEXT-INDENT: 0px" data-mcm-prodgrps="1,2,3">4</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellSpec ItmTblColSpaceSpec ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 15px; TEXT-INDENT: 0px" data-mcm-prodgrps="1,2,3">3/4"</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellSpec ItmTblColSpaceSpec ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 15px; TEXT-INDENT: 0px" data-mcm-prodgrps="1,2,3">2 1/8"</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellSpec ItmTblColSpaceSpecBefrPartNbr ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 12px; TEXT-INDENT: 0px" data-mcm-prodgrps="1,2,3">1/8"</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellPartNbr ItmTblColSpacePartNbr ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" data-mcm-prodgrps="1">2595A736</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellPrce ItmTblColSpacePrceAftrPartNbr ItmTblColSpacePrceHorizPivotBefrPartNbr ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 9px; PADDING-RIGHT: 22px" data-mcm-prodgrps="1">$20.81</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellPartNbr ItmTblColSpacePartNbr ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" data-mcm-prodgrps="2">2595A735</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellPrce ItmTblColSpacePrceAftrPartNbr ItmTblColSpacePrceHorizPivotBefrPartNbr ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 9px; PADDING-RIGHT: 22px" data-mcm-prodgrps="2">$20.81</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellPartNbr ItmTblColSpacePartNbr ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" data-mcm-prodgrps="3">2595A734</TD><TD class="ItmTblCellPrce ItmTblColSpacePrceAftrPartNbr ItmTblColSpacePrceTblEnd ItmTblContentCell NoWrapCell" style="PADDING-LEFT: 9px; PADDING-RIGHT: 5px" data-mcm-prodgrps="3">$20.81</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>





    In stock at McMaster Carr!
     
  18. So, where are you going to find screws to fit it? MMC have them too? Not
    http://www.mcmaster.com/#machine-screws/=pipw8z
     
  19. That was not the point of my post. Someone said they were 8-24 original screws. Then guys jumped in and said essentially "No such thing". I was showing that there is such a thing.
    And they can be found - not easy but they do exist
    Suzhou Yongxiang Fastener Co ., Ltd We offer Titanium screws0-80 2-56 4-40 6-32 8-24 8-32 10-24 10-32 1/4-20

    And here is another tap found on Amazon Mountain (MTN55923) Mountain 3/8-24 NF Machine Screw Tap so there must be some use for them :D

    Apparently they were used in Clock making up into the 60's as well. For sure it is an oddball size (but then Henry used some oddballs as well) and I sure wouldn't spend much time looking for them if those were my wheels, but the fact is 8-24 does exist
     
  20. bobwop
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 6,098

    bobwop
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I found the proper screws, stainless, as the local hardware store
     
  21. JC Sparks
    Joined: Dec 8, 2008
    Posts: 723

    JC Sparks
    Member
    from Ohio

    8-24 is what is called a secondary standard. I would just drill and tap it to 10-24. That way you can get the screws in any head and material that you want easy. JC
     
  22. briz
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 101

    briz
    Member

    here is a discussion about 8-24 machine screws (not 3/8-24 by the way) on The Practical Machinist website.
    Apparently 8-24 was not a standard size going all the way back to the 1920s.
    not sayin it didn't exist, just sayin its not a standard size.
    I also find the similarity to a whitworth size interesting, and he is in Canada after all.

    Anybody got a left handed screwdriver?

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/ot-8-24-threads-191901/
     
  23. Engine man
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,476

    Engine man
    Member
    from Wisconsin

  24. bobwop
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 6,098

    bobwop
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    ok, ok. I will let the cat out of the bag.

    I bought 10-24
     
  25. hook00pad
    Joined: Mar 5, 2013
    Posts: 19

    hook00pad
    Member

    Ha Ha! Good one bobwop
     
  26. etwheels
    Joined: Jul 8, 2008
    Posts: 39

    etwheels
    Member
    from ca.

    I can't take it, I have some original drawings we used in the 60's and 70's, notes say 8-32 for 5 spokes , et super -#6 & #8 pan head self taping screw or 8-32 depending on stock. Et-IV said self taping or 8-32 pan head. The self taping could have been a thread cutting screw or a sheet metal screw. The hole size was #29 drill on all wheels.
    In the bigger picture drill out the bad rusted screws, if the hole is now too big then use an aluminum plug and redrill or use threaded insert , but that is the harder way since you will need to make a jig to drill the new holes on location.
    Bottom line now one will know or care which screw you use, but if purist is the goal then no stainless just zinc plated steel slot head.
    Scott

    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  27. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,904

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Oh, and if stainless is insisted upon, use anti-seize on the threads, or plan on never getting them back out. Probably a good idea with any threads in Aluminum.
     
  28. wheelguy
    Joined: Feb 19, 2011
    Posts: 340

    wheelguy
    Member

    I like to use 10-24 STAINLESS BUTTON HEADS (with anti-seize!) ..
    They are strong, look good (imo), and you don't wind up with screw slots running every direction like you do with the cheap original slotted screws.

    my 2 C worth, maybe less.
     

    Attached Files:

  29. Bert Kollar
    Joined: Jan 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,005

    Bert Kollar
    Member

    My ET's are 10/24
     

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