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Thrashing on Chevy Ad truck bed for LSR

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by phoenix5x, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. phoenix5x
    Joined: Dec 26, 2007
    Posts: 219

    phoenix5x
    Member
    from Ohio

    Well I decided for LSR it was time for the truck to get a real bed floor. The weather didn't cooperate so it only left me last week and this week to get it done before we leave Tuesday for Austin. I searched high and low on the internet for information regarding installing the bed wood in these trucks... I did not happen to find a whole lot of technical info so I hope to make this somewhat of a tech artical in hopes to help some of you out...Now I did not purchase a typical bed wood kit from one of the many companies out there as these kits can get quite expensive. I was lucky enough to have a specialty wood store that specializes in reclaimed wood and specialty woods here near the house. I am not a wood worker so coming up with the right wood and sealant combo to build a strong enough bed that can be used for hauling as well as take any weather while traveling, I needed some info. The owners of HLM here by the house were more than happy to answer all my questions and point me in the right directions..

    For stability they suggested using a hardwood such as white oak...which is what I used. I puchased the 8 boards I needed at a cost of 230 bux. Pretty cheap considering bed wood and parts were more than double that after shipping...not to say anything bad about bedwood and parts they have beautiful products..I just couldn't afford the cost after all was said and done...

    Anyway I got the wood home and chose an oil based stain, based on the suggestions of theguys at the wood store, called candlelight. Now these boards only came in 8 to 10 ft lengths as that's the only way the store sold which was based on board foot. Needless to say I have a lot of wood leftover to make a couple other things if I see fit.

    Like I said before I am not a wood worker so tools to cut and shape wood are almost non existent. So I went to my local home depot and rented a nice table saw for a few hours which only cost me about 30 bux.

    uploadfromtaptalk1364608981837.jpg

    I used this site for all my measurements...a very nice site relating to truck beds...

    http://www.gmcpauls.com/47-72_BedWood_Info.htm

    I first laid all my boards out to lay out the wood grain to make sure I liked the way the grain looked. Then marked and ripped them down to size. Once I was done ripping the wood down to the sizes specified I looked into the cross rails and needed to clean those up and get them sealed so I used some KBS rust blast which was another 30 bux at the paint shop.

    uploadfromtaptalk1364609565007.jpg

    uploadfromtaptalk1364609590094.jpg

    This brings up the location of the cross rails...I had no idea, so once I put them up next to each other it seemed to pop out at me and noticed the pads were in a different location. So if you look at the frame rails you notice that the pads closest together go at the front of the bed. The ones farthest apart go to the rear of the truck.

    Next was to cut out the grooves that the bed straps rest in. I again followed the diagram in the above website and setup a router table. I had to borrow the router but happened to have a tabletop router table that I could screw the router into. Long story why it is the only wood working tool I own.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2013
  2. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 26,218

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Cool, that should look good when it's together. I had planned to be sitting at my mother in law's place in McGregor Texas right now with the 48 in her driveway but too many things either happened or didn't happen. I didn't get the truck done, I didn't get to retire yet and my wife has another two quarters of school before she graduates.

    Keep the progress photos coming, that will give you something to do while the vanish dries and post a road trip thread.
     
  3. phoenix5x
    Joined: Dec 26, 2007
    Posts: 219

    phoenix5x
    Member
    from Ohio

    View attachment 1900742

    So once I had that setup I followed the diagram for the edge cuts of the wood...I setup the router and tested the cuts to get a feel for router setup..

    uploadfromtaptalk1364611477079.jpg

    Since it was setup for the one cut I went ahead made the 1st cut.

    uploadfromtaptalk1364611559628.jpg

    Then modified the router did another test cut and then made the remaining cuts on all the boards...

    uploadfromtaptalk1364611607156.jpg


    Now with all the cuts made the boards needed a lot of sanding...I first used 220 grit then finished with 400 grit to give the wood a nice smoothe finish..

    Once the sanding was finished it was time to break out the various stain and sealants the guys at HLM recommended I use...

    uploadfromtaptalk1364611773102.jpg

    The 1st can is the oil based candlelight colored stain...the stain is easy enough to use...brush it on and wipe it off...do it a couple times to go darker if you wish...I used to coats, which were done pretty much back o back. The stain does not require a dry time before reapplying..

    uploadfromtaptalk1364611946238.jpg

    Depending on the light the darkness of the stain changes it really neat. Next is on to what the wood guys called a vapor barrier for the wood or shellac...This requires a very thin coat brushed on and a 45 min dry time...because it was sandwiched between a couple different products they said I only really neededthe one coat. It gave the wood a decent sheen to it..

    uploadfromtaptalk1364612115416.jpg

    The next product was an interesting one..it is a UV barrier and exterior protectant for the wood...it requires that it be mixed with naptha. The guys at the wood shop that there is a small empty space left in the can and to just fill that remaining space with the naptha this will give it about the 10% solution the product requires. This product is to be brushed on and it is a very sticky substance that brushes on cloudy and dries clear. It litterally feels like your brushing sunscreen onto the wood. It takes anywhere from 8 to 12 hours to dry...being as I only have the abiltiy to do one side at a time I had to wait over night for the one side to dry. Once all sides were dry the wood looked absolutley beautiful..

    uploadfromtaptalk1364612507275.jpg
     
  4. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 26,218

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That does look good.
     
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  5. phoenix5x
    Joined: Dec 26, 2007
    Posts: 219

    phoenix5x
    Member
    from Ohio

    I had ordered the metal strips and hardware kit a couple weeks ago and they were plain steel because I wanted to paint them so I just used self etching primer and rustoleum on them... The hardware kit was just cadmium plated. The strips and hardware kit cost me 130 shipped..

    uploadfromtaptalk1364612727202.jpg

    Once those were dry and the wood was dry it was time to install the bed wood... When I test fit the cross rails earlier I had taken a bunch of measurements in an attempt to square the bed and get the cross rails parallel..after sighting the cross sills I measured each side starting from the back of the bed to the 1st cross rail was about 25.5" ..from front of that1st rail to the middle rail was about 21.75"...from that rail to the front rail was about 23.25"

    Once those were close I had my wife help me lift the bed and get the side pieces of wood in the bed...the entire bed rests on these 2 outer boards...so getting the holes lined up and the bed squared with these 2 boards is paramount... These beds and frames were meant to flex and I will admit that some of the holes hadto be oblonged a bit to get it all to fit...I did however get the bed to within 3/8" of being square which I thought was quite amazing for this truck not having a bed floor since god knows when and I had only placed a piece of plywood in it for he past couple years.

    uploadfromtaptalk1364613329237.jpg

    Tomorrow I will be finishing the bolting in the remaining wood pieces... But to keep you all interested here is a test fit of the remaining wood pieces

    uploadfromtaptalk1364613749147.jpg



    Sent from my DROID device using the TJJ mobile app
     
  6. tnich123
    Joined: May 26, 2009
    Posts: 160

    tnich123
    Member

    Looks good see ya at the roundup.:cool:
     
  7. FlynBrian
    Joined: Oct 5, 2007
    Posts: 759

    FlynBrian
    Member

    Nice job, Looks Great!
     
  8. motoandy
    Joined: Sep 19, 2007
    Posts: 3,286

    motoandy
    Member
    from MB, SC

    very nice. Thank you for sharing. Can't wait to see it in the sun. Don't forget to post a pic.
     
  9. phoenix5x
    Joined: Dec 26, 2007
    Posts: 219

    phoenix5x
    Member
    from Ohio

    I will say as your bolting these pieces if wood in and going from the outside in is the right choice...leave the last 3 metal strips in the middle loose so you have some adjustment room on the wood so you aren't stuck with boards bein too far apart...but here is the finished product for 8 days worth of work spanning 2 weeks..

    uploadfromtaptalk1364681733336.jpg

    uploadfromtaptalk1364681753301.jpg
     
  10. e-tek
    Joined: Dec 19, 2007
    Posts: 424

    e-tek
    Member
    from SK, Canada

    Beautiful work! Love the dark grain.
     

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