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Hot Rods "THE WALL OF SHAME"

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by duncan, Oct 8, 2018.

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  1. duncan
    Joined: Aug 23, 2006
    Posts: 974

    duncan
    Member

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    Took these photos today of the brake pedal out of my friend John’s 34 coach. A so called Hot Rod Shop, who shall remain nameless, changed the brakes from mechanical to hydraulic. To accomplish this feat of engineering, they scabbed on some angle, chunk of tubing to clear the wishbone and some 1/8”x1” strap. Keeping in mind that it was welded by a blind person, would any of you stake your life on this modification? Didn’t think so. On the wall.


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    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018
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  2. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 678

    alanp561
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    The parent metal immediately adjacent to the weld is only 85% of it's original strength.
     
  3. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 678

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Morgan still uses wood in their frames. The wood is steel clad.
     
  4. VANDENPLAS
    Joined: Dec 14, 2009
    Posts: 1,840

    VANDENPLAS
    Member

    To charge money for that :eek::eek:

    Like my uncle joe who does renovations for a living and lately has been going in after the TV show “ pros” to fix stuff They have done.


    “ this asshole deserves nothing less then being shot in the face with a sawed off shot gun! Not even his family should have the rights to an open casket funeral with his workmanship being like this.”

    Wow ok..... I’ll do better :D
     
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  5. topher5150
    Joined: Feb 10, 2017
    Posts: 1,506

    topher5150
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  6. I actually did this to a set of 4 dodge van donut spares to fit my 34 ford. They served to roll the car around the shop while building and transporting it on a trailer. I'm not proud.
     

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  7. Corey "Waldo" E.
    Joined: Sep 17, 2012
    Posts: 45

    Corey "Waldo" E.
    Member

    20181013_205831.jpg parts car I killed. The restorers used a few tubes of blue permatex aa well. 20181013_205914.jpg 20181013_205914.jpg 20181013_210007.jpg cut down 55 gallon drum spare tire well.
     
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  8. Ancient Chinese Proverb -" If one has a welder, it does not make him a welder"
     
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  9. Kerrynzl
    Joined: Jun 20, 2010
    Posts: 2,284

    Kerrynzl
    Member

    Ancient "Kiwi" proverb....... "She's f**ked when a welder can't fix it"
     
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  10. upspirate
    Joined: Apr 15, 2012
    Posts: 1,981

    upspirate
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    That's a little different than driving on the street.....sorta like using plywood discs for shop roll around wheels
     
  11. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,710

    BJR
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    Bleach, loudbang, XXL__ and 1 other person like this.
  12. XXL__
    Joined: Dec 28, 2009
    Posts: 1,711

    XXL__
    Member

    "Honing."

    ty_TN_man_with_jackhammer_1942.gif
     
  13. No they do not. Morgans have had steel frames from day one until the present. They have wood framed bodies, much like old coach built cars
     
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  14. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 678

    alanp561
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    I stand corrected. I remembered watching a documentary on Morgan cars and was sure I watched the frames being steel clad. I went back and looked again. The chassis frames are galvanized steel, the body frames are ash, and depending on the model, are clad in either aluminum or stainless. Beautiful work.
     
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  15. ClarkH
    Joined: Jul 21, 2010
    Posts: 734

    ClarkH
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    The frame of my speedster, as originally found:
    Frame-Crimes.jpg
    For starters, we have the sqaure tubing welded to the frame horns as a DIY lift kit. But the crowning glory is the retro-fitted middle cross-member attached under the frame (and just barely--perhaps they were running low on acetylene). The only point of contact is the lower edge of the frame. Compounding the problem--sadly not visible--is that 6 inches of the left frame rail's lower edge were removed just ahead of this. This was done to accommodate an oversized steering box, and you could see where it had been flexing like crazy for a long time.

    I don't know whether this is Wall Worthy or just what they did in the day. Or both.
     
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  16. duncan
    Joined: Aug 23, 2006
    Posts: 974

    duncan
    Member

    Perfectly acceptable, as long as the roller's are not desirable and it never hits the pavement like that.
     
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  17. bchctybob
    Joined: Sep 18, 2011
    Posts: 1,586

    bchctybob
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    After seeing some of the examples previously posted these don't seem all that bad but just the same.....
    The crude but presumably effective ladder bars from my Austin gasser. They did use "Supertanium" bolts though.
    IMG_1374.JPG IMG_1375.JPG
    The lovely trans crossmember and a 2 x 6 extra crossmember in my '33 pu. The frame was boxed with random pieces of 1/4" plate.
    IMG_1376.JPG IMG_1377.JPG
    And an interesting way to "flush" the doors on my '33 pu jun13_17 (3).JPG

    Note the firewall-to-dash closeout on my Austin, don't know how it passed tech. Also the firewall is two sandwiched sheets of .030 aluminum.
    IMG_1379.JPG
     
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  18. David Gersic
    Joined: Feb 15, 2015
    Posts: 1,902

    David Gersic
    Member
    from DeKalb, IL

    A couple of teenagers in a 1950s garage, that would be understandable. A modern shop, charging real money? Not. Name and shame them.



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  19. 62rebel
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 2,424

    62rebel
    Member

    Damn I'm glad I dismantled that homebuilt body I was making for my Jag special...... y'all woulda LOVED that POS
     
  20. Exhaust clamps are for exhaust.
    90538A53-046C-417D-B2C7-12B2B1C81A6C.png
     
  21. duncan
    Joined: Aug 23, 2006
    Posts: 974

    duncan
    Member

     
  22. bchctybob
    Joined: Sep 18, 2011
    Posts: 1,586

    bchctybob
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    It's hard to believe someone invested time and materials on those, but then I feel that way about almost all of the "cartoon" rods some people are building these days. They would be better off spending the time and materials on something that actually works.
    But I may be wrong. They would be 'da bomb' painted yellow and bolted to the orange rear end in a jacked up 4 dr '59 Rambler station wagon gasser with clear coated rust and bolt-on spindle mount front wheels.
     
  23. Don't have a picture but you can just imagine. A friend called me up and asked if I could help another friend align the rumble lid on his Model A coupe. When I got there I was amazed. Both 1/4's were rusted out about 4 - 5" up from the bottom. Someone had "fixed" them with screen wire and about 1/2" of Bondo. The outside looked fair but :eek:. The opening was not square.
     
  24. anthony myrick
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 4,355

    anthony myrick
    Member
    from al

    One of my students wondered why there were no Hoffman Group parts here yet
     
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  25. Blake 27
    Joined: Apr 10, 2016
    Posts: 518

    Blake 27

    Past crack "repair" on my 27 rpu. HPIM0484.JPG DSC01348-001.JPG
     
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  26. 62rebel
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 2,424

    62rebel
    Member

    The best I can say about that is that it's close to being metal.... My Dad was no welder nor very much with A/O torch, whereas my Granddad was pretty damn good (he owned his own shop in Detroit) at metal work. He was just not interested in hot rods nor restoring old cars, just new wrecks. Dad was forever hunting undamaged fenders for his A's and hated seeing them with cracks he didn't know how to fix. Granddad just couldn't fathom spending money and time fixing old cars. I won't tell y'all what he did to Great Granddad's '47 fluid drive Dodge......
     
  27. Why not? :p
     
  28. 62rebel
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 2,424

    62rebel
    Member

    Y'all might git agitated a bit. Okay, ya twisted my arm. Sometime during the mid sixties, the old faithful '47 blew a head gasket, and was relegated to the back of the tractor shed along with the hay mower, rake, three bottom plow, harrow, etc... Dad was in the process of replacing it and got sidetracked, and it sat, unfinished, until Great Granddad died in 1972. Probably seven or eight years, actually. It had gradually been the victim of childhood horseplay and weather and, even though I pleaded for the folks to let me have the thing, Granddad hauled it over by the chicken coop one fine day and cut it into pieces small enough to load into the trunk of his car and haul to the scrapper. Yeah. Small enough to handle loading into a car trunk. Dad wasn't altogether too happy about it, either, as it was supposed to have been his car.... to replace the '55 Ford Customline they'd already rolled down the hill into a gully to stop it washing out..............
     
  29. 62rebel
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 2,424

    62rebel
    Member

    Side note: I remember riding in this same car when my Mom drove it a few times. I stood in the front floorboard and she let me "steer" the car. Maybe that's why I wanted to keep it so bad. It was literally the only manual transmission car she could drive.....
     
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