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Technical The Right Crimper

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by blowby, Mar 26, 2020.

  1. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 6,279

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Are any of these crimper positions the correct one for these terminals? 0326201312_HDR.jpg
     
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  2. bill gruendeman
    Joined: Jun 18, 2019
    Posts: 219

    bill gruendeman
    Member

    I have the one on the left and like it. Not sure if it’s the right one for the job . The nib ( male)goes to the back side and flaps on the terminal go to the rounded side ( female). The one on the right is for plug wires I think.
     
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  3. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 6,279

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Thanks Bill, yeah that's my go to for the usual crimps but when I do these it looks like a 5 year old did it.
     
  4. oldolds
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 2,895

    oldolds
    Member

    I was told the indentation is supposed to be on the opposite side of the split in the terminal. I have both kind as well. Usually go for the left side pair. I seldom use ends like you show. Usually use the kind that are round already.
     
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  5. winduptoy
    Joined: Feb 19, 2013
    Posts: 1,770

    winduptoy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The connectors you show in your photo, one set of tabs is for the conductor and the other set is for the insulation. I don't know if it is correct but using that type of connector, I always bend the ears over on to the stripped conductor using needle nosed pliers, then crimp...

    Sent from my XT1585 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  6. bill gruendeman
    Joined: Jun 18, 2019
    Posts: 219

    bill gruendeman
    Member

    Mine look like a 4 year old did them so you better than me, that’s what they make heat stink tubing for
     
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  7. Mimilan
    Joined: Jun 13, 2019
    Posts: 398

    Mimilan
    Member

    Paul,
    For Packard terminals the crimp needs to double fold inwards.
    You need a crimper with the peak in the centre of one side so they fold inwards.
    Packard Terminal Crimper.jpg
    Wire Crimper.gif

    You need a wire stripper as well :D

    Wire Stripper.PNG
     
  8. jaracer
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 172

    jaracer
    Member

    Just bought the correct crimper from O'Reilly's for $32.00. The part number is SG 18600.

    When I worked for Freightliner we had all the crimping tools in kits for Packard 56 terminals (that's what you were showing) and other terminals used in the truck wiring. The Packard tools are still available, but they are around $100.00. I just tried the O'Reilly tool and it works perfect.
     
  9. rustydusty
    Joined: Apr 19, 2010
    Posts: 1,317

    rustydusty
    Member

    I'm sorry, but did you make that "wire stripper" just for this thread???
    Too funny!
     
  10. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 6,279

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Thanks guys. I'll get the correct ones, not in any hurry.
     
  11. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 10,156

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    I used those style terminals for everything on my RPU.

    They’re the best way to make connections as the other guys have said the small ears grab the wire and the large ones crimp to the insulation for strain relief.

    I also used a short piece of dual wall (glue lined) heat shrink on them.

    They’re vastly superior to other crimp connectors, there’s a reason why the OEM s use them.

    Those style connections can be hard to find, I found American Autowire had a good selection and you can order them through Summit.

    I bought their set of crimping tools, a good investment that made wiring my RPU
    a lot easier and did a top quality job.



     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2020
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  12. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,555

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Don’t get me started on crimps! Lol ........ I crimp and solder and heat shrink! Been doing it for 40+ years with success! But I was told here on the HAMB, I have been doing it wrong! I have several crimp tools! I use the one that best fits the terminal and wire. I have never had one of my thousands of connections ever fail! Must be doing something right!




    Bones
     
  13. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 6,192

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    Bones,Lol. The tool should have the insulation and the wire crimps in the same direction so don't have to keep rotating the tool?
     
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  14. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,555

    Boneyard51
    Member

    I never use “ insulated” terminals! If I am forced to use one, I remove the insulation! You cannot crimp a terminal with insulation on it! It is impossible! I am a uninsulated terminal guy that crimps the terminal as properly as possible, I have at least a half a dozen crimping tools, then I hit it with some solder, then cover it with heat shrink. But proper soldering techniques are very important!


    Bones
     
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  15. kabinenroller
    Joined: Jan 26, 2012
    Posts: 373

    kabinenroller
    Member

    I also use nothing but uninsulated terminals and shrink tube. The crimp tool of choice for me is this one: https://www.jensentools.com/eclipse...per-for-red-blue-yellow-terminals/p/711pl0002
    I have a number of inserts for the jaws that are specific to the type of terminal I am installing, it does pin connectors(Packard) in one operation. I have been purchasing my terminals from Waytek, I prefer not use solder.
    Jim
     
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  16. 325w
    Joined: Feb 18, 2008
    Posts: 5,232

    325w
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from texas

    You can order the Packard terminals form mouser electronics. The spelling might not be correct. You can use them no solder required. In the factory we could do a wire repair and never have an issue. They are expensive. The Packard pliers will crimp the insulated terminals nicely. I take the plastic off with the rotating wire brush.
     
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  17. sleepchamber
    Joined: Feb 11, 2020
    Posts: 15

    sleepchamber
    Member

    Well....i have never seen uninsulated terminals at the auto parts store...or i have not been looking. Learned something new again.
     
  18. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,555

    Boneyard51
    Member

    It’s kinda my pet peeve, insulted terminals! I have seen real nice electrical systems in vehicles, color coded, routed nicely, labeled etc, then I see that they used crappy crimp pliers on an insulated terminal! I about up chuck! Really. Over the years I have acquired thousands of uninsulated terminals. Last Summer I bought a quart jar full of them at a flea market for $5.
    Wether you decide to solder or not, use the proper crimping tool on uninsulated terminals and follow up with a good quality heat shrink! Makes for a good connection, it will last forever and looks marvelous!

    Just my .02 , after a 33 year career working with a fleet that has a lot of wires! Lol






    Bones
     
  19. A 2 B
    Joined: Dec 2, 2015
    Posts: 95

    A 2 B
    Member

    I do have a few other crimpers but my "go to" set I've had for 50 years, made by Essex Terminals who made wire harnesses for the big 3. We never soldered wire terminals. DSC05870.JPG DSC05874.JPG DSC05880.JPG The wire is stripped to length allowing it to be crimped separately than the insulation.

    There sometimes seems to be a little confusion about "insulated". When I refer to insulation, I'm talking about the wire covering, not the plastic ends on cheap aftermarket terminals, which I have no use for.

    EDIT: Great video Blue One, explains it well.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2020
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  20. jaracer
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 172

    jaracer
    Member

    Del City is another source. They also have the connector bodies.
     
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  21. I see so many crimps in my line of work, most are insulated and hold well if they are crimped correctly and you have sufficient strain relief. We are a bug about tool calibration and training at work. Remember the days when we stripped wire with a Bic lighter and two fingers? Crimps were done with cutting pliers.
     
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  22. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,555

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Those “daul” crimp terminal are great, but hard to find. Those use the first crimp for the wire for electrical connection and the second crimps the wires insulation to “ spread” the flexing of the wire, so that it doesn’t break right at the first crimp joint.
    By using simple uninsulated terminals and crimping and soldering, or not and putting a heat shrink on the terminal and wires insulation, you accomplish the same thing. The heat shrink “ supports” the wire, spreading out the flex, so that is doesn’t break at the terminal.






    Bones
     
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  23. A 2 B
    Joined: Dec 2, 2015
    Posts: 95

    A 2 B
    Member

    Soldering sure couldn't hurt, but being in a fast paced production environment we couldn't justify the time or expense.
    My son recently showed me a very nice pair of crimpers he uses for work. He is a machine repair man. They had a whole lot more capability/versatility than anything I ever used. I'll ask him for some more details but I know they had to cost more than I would be willing to spend.
    Using a simple set like in my pic, there are quite a few different operations that can be done, not readily apparent for prepping or custom/odd terminals.
     
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  24. VANDENPLAS
    Joined: Dec 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,094

    VANDENPLAS
    Member

    2D11D131-6461-47C8-B4C2-AB96EDFEB9A9.jpeg

    I bought this set at princess auto, Canada’s version of harbour freight.

    works very well on all types of crimp connections.


    I’ve done thousands of crimps with insulated connectors and the “ fancy ones with the heat shrink already in them, without failure.

    rhe big thing is buying quality crumps, the cheap ones are just that ..... CHEAP !!!
    They fold and bend etc.

    a quality crimp connection with quality wire and a good tool makes a great crimp



    C6892982-5A3D-4B4D-9CFE-1F196F06D5A6.jpeg


    these are my go to crumpets for most jobs.
     
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  25. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,555

    Boneyard51
    Member

    That, my friends it the correct answer! A quality crimp! Sometimes that is a little difficult to accomplish. But one easy back yard test you can perform, while working for yourself, is to see if you can pull the wire out of the terminal. Give it a “ good” pull! If it comes out.... bad crimp! I have had some “ factory” crimps cause a bad connection! Just because it was crimped at some factory don’t assume it’s a perfect crimp.

    That’s why I crimp and solder! Not telling anyone to do it, as I have been informed it is not the proper way. But on my shit, it’s going to get both crimp and solder and then a heat shrink! It’s hard to teach old dogs new tricks! Lol













    Bones
     
  26. Budget36
    Joined: Nov 29, 2014
    Posts: 3,020

    Budget36
    Member

    I've a few pairs of Molex crimpers that do the same thing, but for smaller stuff, I also have just had the light bulb come on and know what that other crimper I have is for!

    I also hate crimping over a plastic insulator, looks like shit when done, even with my Kliens, the plastic will want to squish out some.

    I too, long ago just went with non-insulated ones and heatshrink or tape, depending what I have nearby.
     
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  27. David Gersic
    Joined: Feb 15, 2015
    Posts: 2,065

    David Gersic
    Member
    from DeKalb, IL

    For Packard terminals, this:

    [​IMG]

    is the best answer. A clip on the back holds the terminal in place. Insert wire, squeeze, done. Perfect crimps, every time.

    A friend (Ed) runs greatplainselectronics.com and can hook you up with one. His crimper prices are very good, too.

    Automotive connectors and wire are designed for crimps, not solder. A good crimp is air-tight and will last forever. Solder makes the joint more brittle. You can do it, lots of guys do, but it’s still not the right way to make a secure wire to connector joint.




    Sent from my iPad using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     

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