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Art & Inspiration The Flying Ford Flathead...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Jive-Bomber, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. Jive-Bomber
    Joined: Aug 21, 2001
    Posts: 2,959

    Jive-Bomber
    MODERATOR

    Jive-Bomber submitted a new blog post:

    The Flying Ford Flathead...

    [​IMG]

    Continue reading the Original Blog Post
     
  2. Bluedot
    Joined: Oct 26, 2011
    Posts: 267

    Bluedot
    Member

    Way cool. An all aluminum flattie - whooda thunk? I gotta wonder about the connection between engine and prop. It must have been quite a collection of gearboxes and u-joints, as it had to go under the cockpit. Either that or a heckuva driveshaft tunnel straight thru.
     
    LOU WELLS likes this.
  3. GordonC
    Joined: Mar 6, 2006
    Posts: 660

    GordonC
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    What a nicely shaped little guy. I would have put a tail fin on it to see if I could make it more stable and then...
     
    belair likes this.
  4. flamingokid
    Joined: Jan 5, 2005
    Posts: 2,080

    flamingokid
    Member

    Very cool, just a downright appealing little bugger.As for the Tri-Motor , there was one out at McCarran in Las Vegas that was used as a very small restaurant.My grandmother and I ate there, and they would occasionally do dinner flights.We had the ground version,but how many people can say that they ate on a Tri. The interior was interesting,it had the Brobdingnagian version of WWII bomber seats and wood paneling, giving it the aesthetics of a 1930's motor home.The 15p definitely meets my style requirements, though.
     
    tractorguy likes this.
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  5. KevKo
    Joined: Jun 25, 2009
    Posts: 82

    KevKo
    Member
    from Motown

    Ford's Dearborn Development Center on Oakwood is the old airport. Some of the old buildings are still there, including a big hangar. And the runway, although possibly repaved. Right across the street is the Mariott Dearborn Inn, originally built to provide close lodging to well-to-do travelers. Try Google maps.
     
  6. gearhead695456
    Joined: Aug 2, 2008
    Posts: 231

    gearhead695456
    Member

    I had a hard enough time keeping tune in my little Stromies at sea level, I cant imagine.....
     
    tractorguy and Bandit Billy like this.
  7. Great article. Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 2,256

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I was thinking the same thing. The flying flathead threads that start "my flathead stopped running" probably are not going get any responses from the OP.
     
  9. Lou39
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 119

    Lou39
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Cedar, MI

    I see no provision for carb ice under that Stromie either, yikes! The Ford Fliver, a single place more conventionally configured AC , had a "B" motor. Middle '30's experiment ended with the death of the test pilot. A replica hangs in the Ford Museum. Pietenpols, a popular homebuilt AC , was designed for an "A" motor.
    '
     
  10. tractorguy
    Joined: Jan 5, 2008
    Posts: 402

    tractorguy
    Member

    Great story ! For anyone who is interested in this kind of stuff, I would highly recommend the WAAM Museum in Hood River, Oregon. I have visited there twice in the last 6yrs on our trips from Wisconsin out to visit our daughter in Portland.

    What I love about the museum is the pairing of vintage light aircraft.....vintage motorcyles.....vintage cars. There are several Ford engine conversions on display, as well as motorcycle engine conversions such as Henderson and Indian. I really do have to cringe when I look at the heavy old cast iron Ford flathead V/8 hanging way out in front of the old airplanes......took some really skilled people to ever get them off the ground.....and then actually fly them.

    Plan to spend a LOT of time there if you visit. The staff and owners are great people.

    Have fun
     
    flamingokid likes this.
  11. The 39 guy
    Joined: Nov 5, 2010
    Posts: 2,133

    The 39 guy
    Member

    Very interesting. I have to wonder if any of those aluminum engines are still around or if any were used in vehicles .
     
  12. badvolvo
    Joined: Jul 25, 2011
    Posts: 127

    badvolvo
    Member

    Way back when, a friend had a little old plane that had belonged to his father, I don't recall the make, but it had a model B engine mounted upside down.
    Love to see an aluminum flattie, although I expect the standard cracks may be more difficult to repair.
     
  13. Lou39
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 119

    Lou39
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Cedar, MI

    Probably Pietenpol experimental, its a design from the '30's still being built and flown albeit with many other engines such as Corvair and Pinto.
     
  14. badvolvo
    Joined: Jul 25, 2011
    Posts: 127

    badvolvo
    Member

    I going to ask him. I know they sold it a few years back, might be back flying by now.
     
  15. Jonnie King
    Joined: Aug 12, 2007
    Posts: 1,956

    Jonnie King
    Member
    from St. Louis

    Jive-Bomber...
    Very cool ! That little guy reminds of some of the current "surveillance" planes that are in use...those small flyers that can get in-and-out of almost anywhere, have night vision, tracking beams, etc.

    The technology in the one shown here from decades ago is one-upped in the New Millennium, but can you imagine the look on the kids & adults faces when they saw that over 80 years ago ?! It would have been envisioned in the world's of Buck Rogers & Flash Gordon.

    Thanks,
    Jonnie
    www.legends.thewwbc.net
     
  16. Blade58
    Joined: Mar 5, 2012
    Posts: 225

    Blade58
    Member
    from apopka ,Fl

    Nice history info , 1st time hearing about this, as much as they show on the Discovery channel about "American History"it was never mention when they were talking about Henry Ford , they did mention his attempt to "FORD" town in South America, Cool Airplane ,more like a Bad ass radical design before its time
     
  17. Dan Roth
    Joined: Dec 3, 2017
    Posts: 1

    Dan Roth

    Arrow Aircraft of Lincoln, NE built a Arrow Sport V/8, using a 1936 Ford V/8 which was modified for aircraft use. That was approved by the US Department of Commerce. The certificate official #601 dated 4/15/1936 and certificate Official #151 dated 8/12/1936. Arrow did not build many, but there as still a few around
     
    Hnstray likes this.
  18. yhprum
    Joined: Feb 23, 2007
    Posts: 7

    yhprum
    Member
    from Phoenix

    Attached Files:

    Hnstray likes this.
  19. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 2,166

    jimmy six
    Member

    Leave it to Henry....an airplane for the masses. I wonder what it would have been like with a tail.... Great design.
     

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