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Projects The Babushka "T"

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by edwardlloyd, Dec 10, 2015.

  1. woodbutcher
    Joined: Apr 25, 2012
    Posts: 3,197

    woodbutcher
    Member

    :D Hi Ed.Great build sir.Sweet sounding engine too.Please keep the updates coming.
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
     
  2. clever chassis work and a nice build.
     
  3. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Getting closer to a finished car now. Yesterday the mechanical fuel pump failed but I got many of the little problems resolved. I swapped out the 1 1/8" front brake cylinders with 1" cylinders and that almost doubled the front braking power, but it still isn't enough so I'm going to try fitting a master cylinder with a larger bore.
    New additions are the gas tank cover and the windshield wiper mount.
    DSCN0742.JPG DSCN0743.JPG DSCN0744.JPG DSCN0745.JPG DSCN0746.JPG DSCN0747.JPG DSCN0748.JPG DSCN0749.JPG
     
  4. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    DSCN0750.JPG DSCN0751.JPG DSCN0752.JPG DSCN0753.JPG DSCN0754.JPG DSCN0755.JPG DSCN0756.JPG DSCN0757.JPG
    License plate light is from a '49 Chevy. The parking brake is from an early 50s Morris Oxford. The taillights are reproduction '37 Ford. The rubber floor covering is Model-T Ford. The gas pedal is '32 Ford.
     
    Jeff34, Scott Mannion, Stogy and 3 others like this.
  5. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    DSCN0758.JPG DSCN0759.JPG DSCN0761.JPG DSCN0763.JPG
    I replaced those cheesy self locking chromed nuts which come with the '32 shackle kits with castle nuts and cotter pins.
    Also pictured here is the modified '40-'48 column gear change which now operates the automatic transmission.
    That lower water hose took some finding too! It is very tight down there and I needed a double bend in the lower hose. I struck lucky and found a 1938 Chevy truck lower hose which fitted after cutting down a bit.

    DSCN0764.JPG DSCN0765.JPG
     
  6. greaser
    Joined: Apr 30, 2006
    Posts: 835

    greaser
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Great job Edward! I always enjoy reading your posts, and seeing what your up to. That Nailhead will be a real torque monster in that little roadster!
    What are you using for front turn signal lights?
     
  7. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,068

    Mart
    Member

    Nice work, Edward, but (with respect) your statement on wheel cylinder sizes don't make sense. Bigger wheel cylinders should increase braking power relative to the pedal effort applied. Likewise a bigger master cylinder bore will decrease braking performance relative to applied pedal effort. The exception to this is if the original pedal is travelling too far and you're too far down the pedal when the brakes come on. In this case the smaller wheel cylinders and bigger master cylinder can make the brakes better because it brings the braking back into the "sweet spot" of the pedal. This is what happened with my roadster - it works better with a 1-1/16" cylinder than the 1" cylinder I had before.

    Mart.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2016
    Scott Mannion likes this.
  8. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Well that's what's happening Mart. Pedal pressure is no problem. Its servo assisted too. Brakes come on fine and the rears lock up but I run out of travel before the fronts are firm enough. The Smart master cylinder has a 19.05mm bore. I'm going to try one from an Espace 3 with 23.8mm bore.
     
  9. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    On Saturday we had a party to celebrate it's completion, even though it's not quite finished. However the final upholstery will be done later after it's registered.
    The hub caps are fitted and the seat bottom and side panels have been upholstered in black leather rescued from an old sofa. DSCN0845.JPG DSCN0846.JPG DSCN0847.JPG DSCN0848.JPG DSCN0849.JPG
     
  10. Looking great and I'll bet this is a REALLY fun car to drive - enjoy!
     
  11. So what you're saying is that you need more volume, not pressure? As you'll end up with less wheel cylinder pressure with the same pedal pressure - when going to a larger master cylinder. Let us know what the final 'solution' ends up being.
     
  12. garth slater
    Joined: Apr 17, 2008
    Posts: 260

    garth slater
    Member
    from Melbourne

    Car looks great. Congratd on getting it finished
     
  13. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    I found a 33% larger bore master cylinder which fitted the Smart servo and reservoir as if it had been designed to fit! It's a 26.8mm cylinder from a non-ABS Renault Espace III. With 1" cylinders up front it works perfectly. Apart from the bore size, everything else was the same. A combination of luck and three hours trawling eBay for new master cylinders.
     
    indestructableforce likes this.
  14. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,068

    Mart
    Member

    Well, you ended up with more or less the stock ford master cylinder size, so it should be good. Car looks great by the way.

    Mart.
     
    kidcampbell71 likes this.
  15. Man the car looks great , now enjoy all the hard work !
     
  16. waxhead
    Joined: May 11, 2013
    Posts: 1,114

    waxhead
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from West Oz

    Very nice, enjoy.
     
  17. Gotta ask a question: The steering wheel sure looks like it it really back close to the drive . . . have you noticed that as an issue and would you have preferred to have it further away? (closer to the dash). Just wondering . . .
     
  18. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    The driver is very tall (6'6") and needs the space behind the wheel for his knees. The car was built to fit one person. All components, brake pedal, gas pedal, steering wheel and shifter were mocked up first and built around the driver. However I'm quite fat and a little under 6' and still have plenty of space behind the wheel. The wheel is quite high up. When driving you look through the wheel not over it. It's not a cut down, '40 wheel, it's a full size one. This makes for quite an exciting pre-war race car feeling when sitting in it. However there's still plenty of room between your body and the wheel to cross your hand to the other side. The seat back will only be thinly upholstered. It's actually surprisingly comfortable just the bare metal seat back.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2016
  19. Thanks - was just wondering. I kind of forgot about the very limited leg-room in a car/body style like this . . . so you have to have someplace to put them! This is a very common challenge in any early body style like this - especially when it is channeled (though your car doesn't look to be). The people back in the day MUST have been a lot smaller! Hell - every vintage race/dry-lakes picture you see . . . bunch of skinny damn kids! LOL!
     
  20. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Here's 6'6" Alex sitting in his Rod. As you can see, plenty of space but the wheel couldn't have been any closer to the dash.
    DSCN0863.JPG
     
  21. I can see that now - no "foot well" for his legs . . they gotta go someplace!
     
    volvobrynk likes this.
  22. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    I made some cycle fenders for the T. Fronts were made out of a 1933-34 spare wheel ring which fits on the 1934 wheels. Using a left spindle from a RHD car came in handy here as I was able to use the two redundant holes in the steering arms as one of the mounting points for the front fenders.
    Rears were made from a pair of new front fenders from a tractor. The fenders are bolt on and easily removed.
    DSCN1070.JPG DSCN1074.JPG DSCN1075.JPG DSCN1077.JPG DSCN1079.JPG DSCN1080.JPG DSCN1081.JPG DSCN1083.JPG
     
  23. gnichols
    Joined: Mar 6, 2008
    Posts: 10,680

    gnichols
    Member
    from Tampa, FL

    Nice fenders!!!! Gary
     
  24. bengeltiger
    Joined: Mar 3, 2012
    Posts: 469

    bengeltiger
    Member

    Nice job on the fenders!
     
  25. Great job on the fenders. They're fully functional, but hardly noticeable.
     
  26. volvobrynk
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,588

    volvobrynk
    Member
    from Denmark

    It's funny you say not noticeable, it pops in to my eye as the first thing, maybe because I have wet dreams about some going era perfect on the fenders on a new build, I almost messed up my pants in pure ecstasy!
    That is awesome Edward loyd!

    Any more info on the supplier of said rear fenders, because they would be perfect to make my car live up to the Danish fender law!
     
  27. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,065

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    volvobrynk likes this.
  28. Baumi
    Joined: Jan 28, 2003
    Posts: 2,359

    Baumi
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ed, the T is outsatndingly nice! And thanks for posting the link! I just bought a set for my 34.
     
  29. bryanyeskie
    Joined: Jun 13, 2016
    Posts: 157

    bryanyeskie
    Member
    from Hixton

    I guess I can listen to it run a few more times. Sounds awesome looks great
     

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