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TECH...well sorta... JAG IFS into mid fifties F100

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Tall Paul, Feb 28, 2010.

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  1. chevsen
    Joined: Feb 10, 2005
    Posts: 34

    chevsen
    Member

    I usually plumb the proportioning valves in the engine compartment, near the master cylinder. You could hide it further back along the frame as well. Progress on the Stude is slow....work, kids, etc.
     
  2. fishbone61
    Joined: Jul 12, 2011
    Posts: 8

    fishbone61
    Member

    Thanks Chevsen.Found out that the Jag M/C is f....cked.Need to replace it with one of a Camaro ore Corvette.Installed the XJ12 front springs.No bump steer and the ground clearens is up to 18cm.Power steering is perfect.Wat a Thread.
     
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  3. fishbone61
    Joined: Jul 12, 2011
    Posts: 8

    fishbone61
    Member

    Has anyone done some adjustment on the camber/caster from a Jag IFS that has bin instaled in a 53/56 F100?
    It feels a bid od going around corners.Steering wants to forse itself going in a streight line forworth.
     
  4. ford5t1
    Joined: Aug 30, 2006
    Posts: 62

    ford5t1
    Member
    from usa

    hey guy's, i'm reading on and on and i have decided to go with a jag set up in my '65 ford f100 also. but now someone tells me that the oilpan off a 302 doesn't clear the crossmember.
    can someone tell me if this is correct or not and are there kit's available to solve this problem?

    thanks

    see ya

    twan
     
  5. Smokey2
    Joined: Jan 11, 2011
    Posts: 919

    Smokey2
    Member

    Thanks "Tallpaul
    As result of the Previous Post, This front IFS is going in me '54 Chevy Choptop........mine came out of late 80's, there are a little harder to find HERE, and therfore cost is more, But still less expensive than front clip. Appreciate the Post.
    Smokey
    ____________________________________________

    Still Smoked up.......but, not as Bad ! See'ya :cool:
     
  6. Bobby Peru
    Joined: Mar 30, 2007
    Posts: 5

    Bobby Peru
    Member
    from Australia

    Hey Ford5t1
    In Australia generally when doing this conversion we use a sump from a ford bronco as these are a rear sump and allow just enough clearance.
    Hope this helps
    Bob
     
  7. igby
    Joined: Aug 6, 2005
    Posts: 109

    igby
    Member

     
  8. IRON MAIDEN
    Joined: May 28, 2010
    Posts: 517

    IRON MAIDEN
    Member

    Preface: 46' International Harvester K3 Longbed. I converted over to an 87' Jaguar XJ6 frontend. Rearend is a 95' Ford Explorer 8.8 with disc brakes.
    I'm starting to finish up the rear suspension, just going with the standard leaf spring setup. Just ordered my motor mounts and trans mount and will get the 327/700R4 combo transplanted soon.
    Also just picked up from another Hamb member, an Ididit 31" universal tilt/shift column.

    So looking ahead, I'm starting to look at brake pedal setups. I did take the complete pedal/master/booster setup from the Jaguar I took the front and rear ends from. It would need to be customized to be made to work and I'm not sure I have the room on the firewall for it anyways as it has a huge booster. Thinking I would rather just pick up a new setup as this is too important an area of the build to risk using used parts.
    So, my questions for the experts out there, with the huge Jag front disc brakes and Explorer rear disc brakes...... what do I go with? Is there any issues with the under floor setups? it would be nice to go that way and keep the firewall cleaner. My Harvester has a trapdoor in the cab under the drivers feet to access the the battery. My battery is being moved to a different location so this would be a good spot for it. I found this setup for a pretty good price but know nothing about it. Seems that similar products are far more expensive. Any thoughts?
    http://www.southernrods.com/categori...duct-1892.html
    <!-- / message -->
     
  9. styleline
    Joined: Feb 14, 2009
    Posts: 868

    styleline
    Member
    from so-hol

    nice pics i have alsow a jag conversion front&rear drives great
     
  10. 65-deluxe
    Joined: Sep 12, 2011
    Posts: 10

    65-deluxe
    Member

    Sorry to jump on the thread - Loving all the information and im convinced .
    Just need to ask if anyone knows what the rear end of an 86 XJS straight 6 would be - Inboard discs or outer and the gearing ratio . Ive been offered one at the right price but its along way away .

    would like to do both front and rear on my 48 3600 .
    Thanks Jon
     
  11. chevsen
    Joined: Feb 10, 2005
    Posts: 34

    chevsen
    Member

    An '86 XJS would be inboard brakes with either a 2.88 or 3.07 ratio, to the best of my knowledge.
     
  12. 65-deluxe
    Joined: Sep 12, 2011
    Posts: 10

    65-deluxe
    Member

    Thanks very grateful
     
  13. oldcarfart
    Joined: Apr 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,437

    oldcarfart
    Member

    You might be sorry you did not use the matching rear suspension for the best handling situation.
     
  14. aldixie
    Joined: May 28, 2008
    Posts: 1,644

    aldixie
    Member

    I did a conversion using front and rear Jaguar suspension on a F2 about 14 years ago. It rode really well. I have also installed one on my 50 Chevy Styleline and this time bagged it. Very easy to bag.
     
  15. oldcarfart
    Joined: Apr 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,437

    oldcarfart
    Member

    most OEM wheels are HUB CENTRIC and aftermarket wheels are LUG CENTRIC, so most aftermarket wheels should clear the issue.
     
  16. 26 roadster
    Joined: Apr 21, 2008
    Posts: 2,015

    26 roadster
    Member

    I have a 89 front and rear for 500, PM me
     
  17. IRON MAIDEN
    Joined: May 28, 2010
    Posts: 517

    IRON MAIDEN
    Member

    I know I will. I will always wonder how much better the ride could be. I still have the rear. If my financial situation ever improves, I could swap it out. Problem is the $$$ needed to re-gear the differencial and rebuild the rest of the suspension. I had to cut corners somewhere and this was a place that I could do so without it being a really bad thing. I will still have a good working rear suspension with a good rear axle in there. Oh well.
     
  18. 48buickkid
    Joined: Dec 8, 2010
    Posts: 163

    48buickkid
    Member

    Ok guys here is the deal, the guy I work for stripping little triumphs and mgs has an 86/87 xj6 wire wheels runs and drives clean title says I can have it if I strip three cars for him. Basically planned on diving it till something goes wrong with the jag driveline and then taking the front and rear suspension. I have a 1954 f100 and I have heard this be called and almost bolt in swap for f100s. Ive read this thread and would prefer soft mounted. My biggest concern is that I don't have a welder so how bolt in is it really and when it comes to steering I don't want some bulky ugly column just wonder what you have to use for steering? Also how hard would the rear be to install? Detailed pics would be great. If it came down to it I can have some welding done.
     
  19. IRON MAIDEN
    Joined: May 28, 2010
    Posts: 517

    IRON MAIDEN
    Member

    The whole "almost Bolt-In" thing just means it doesn't take too much fabrication to swap it in. No welding means no swap! There will be a lot of welding required. in fact, the F100 requires notching the frame as well. here will be about the best you will find in terms of what you are up against. Good luck.

    http://www.uk-hotrods.co.uk/v2/garage_scene/me/page_1.php
     
  20. IRON MAIDEN
    Joined: May 28, 2010
    Posts: 517

    IRON MAIDEN
    Member

    Finally found a matching set of Centerline wheels for the front of my truck. I still need to get some tires mounted to them to use as rollers during my mockup. I was hoping they would slide onto the Jag hubs but it's a no go. So I need some advice, tips, direction.... Should I remove the hubs to take to a machine shop to have them turned down? Should I grind them down myself? If so, what should I use? Or should I just open up the wheel hole a bit? I'm worried if I open up the wheel hole, the center cap or spinner won't fill the hole right. Anyone? And are the original Centerline wheels Lug-centric or Hub-centric?
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2011
  21. chevsen
    Joined: Feb 10, 2005
    Posts: 34

    chevsen
    Member

    IIRC, the interference is only at the "shoulder" area of the hub/wheel mating surface, and would not require increasing the ID throughout the entire wheel's center if you decide to go that route. Also, I doubt that any aftermarket wheels are truly hub-centric. Back to your question, I have heard of either solutions being done successfully in the past, but no personal experience. For my current build, I am changing to a 5 x 4.5" bolt pattern (weld and drill, since the hub castings are thicker at the stud areas) and will be running wheels that already have a large enough center.
     
  22. 53sled
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 5,818

    53sled
    Member
    from KCMO

    I pulled the studs, spun the hub and used an angle grinder, but you could use a brake lathe if the local part store has someone who is willing to break the rules.
     
  23. toddc
    Joined: Nov 25, 2007
    Posts: 981

    toddc
    Member

    Being a machinist the idea of doing it with an angle grinder seems pretty dodgy, but it would probably work.

    It should only take 15 minute to do the job in a lathe. I'd take the hubs to a machine shop.
     
  24. Slag Kustom
    Joined: May 10, 2004
    Posts: 4,312

    Slag Kustom
    Member

    any wheel is best mounted hub centric.
     
  25. Great thread. subscribe!
     
  26. IRON MAIDEN
    Joined: May 28, 2010
    Posts: 517

    IRON MAIDEN
    Member

    I do understand that, but I was under the impression that the original Centerlines like I am using are not hub-centric. I'm sure the best way to do this would be to take the hubs and my wheels to a machine shop and let them measure the wheel openings and machine the hubs to just fit. I was hoping for a less expensive route as I don't know many shops around here and the ones I've contacted before for other things were crazy overpriced. But, doing it the right way is always the best option. Any tips on removing the hubs? Anything special I should know?
     
  27. toddc
    Joined: Nov 25, 2007
    Posts: 981

    toddc
    Member

    Try a community college for the machine work, the teachers are always after quick cash :D
     
  28. IRON MAIDEN
    Joined: May 28, 2010
    Posts: 517

    IRON MAIDEN
    Member

    So I'm gonna remove the hubs and take them to have them machined down. What is the proper way to remove them? From just looking at them, is this correct? Remove the brake calipers from the rotors. Pop off the center cap and remove the hub bearing nut. I assume it will now pull off. Unbolt the hub from the rotor. This sound about right? Will a machine shop need to remove the studs to take down the shoulder? If so, am i going to need to get new studs?
     
  29. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,797

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    I do not recommend removing metal from the hubs. Open up the wheels.
     
  30. Mark T
    Joined: Feb 19, 2007
    Posts: 1,901

    Mark T
    Member

    Do you have access to a brake lathe? It should work to turn them down.
     
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