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Tech: Running Board Brackets 35 Ford PU type

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dirk35, Jul 3, 2008.

  1. Dirk35
    Joined: Mar 8, 2001
    Posts: 2,023

    Dirk35
    Member

    Just thought Id post how I did the running board brackets on my 35’ Ford Pickup. On mine, the stock brackets were made of a pretty thin material and they had torn away over the year and were causing the Board to move a lot and sag really badly. The pictures follow the sequence I built the brackets in.
    On the 35 Ford Pickup brackets from the factory, the bracket mount point is actually below the Board, instead of like a Model A with the mount point above the board. Hopefully some of you can use the ideas I used to make my brackets, to make your own.
    I used 1/8 plate and had the local Steel shop bend them to a “U” Shape. They also cut the curve in it, but you could easily do that yourself also if your metal shop doesn’t have that ability.
    Once I got them in the shape I needed I bolted the Running Board up to the truck and made sure measure its height front and back up from the ground. I actually also put blocks of wood up to the bottom of the board also so after I removed the bracket, I could ensure I got it back in the right position (so it wouldn’t be tweeked or sag). I then pulled it back off and ground the old bracket off from the inside. My Boards are pretty pitted, so I couldn’t tell where to drill out the spot welds on the top, or I would have done that as it would’ve been much easier. While the running board is off, you’ll want to drill out the old spot welds once the bracket is off, as you’ll be rosette welding the board back to the new bracket.
    Once I got the old bracket off, I bolted the running board back up and drilled the back plate of the bracket and bolted it to the frame (which is also through the running board). Make sure to hold the bracket up in place, and then make the back piece before drilling the holes. I had to grind the brackets so all of the “legs” of the bracket would rest against the frame.
    I then pulled the bracket off, welded it up.
    Next, I put it back under the running board, bolted it to the frame of the truck, then rosette welded it through the top of the running board. You’ll have to pull the running board back off to weld all of the holes to the bracket where the cab overlaps. Then clean the welds smooth with the flapper wheel and bolt the running board back to the truck. Now they are way stronger than the factory brackets, the running boards no longer sag, and look good too. Let me know what you think, and I hope it helps some of you.
     

    Attached Files:

    Ric Dean likes this.
  2. Dirk35
    Joined: Mar 8, 2001
    Posts: 2,023

    Dirk35
    Member

    Below are the finished in primer pictures.
     

    Attached Files:

    Ric Dean likes this.
  3. Flat Ernie
    Joined: Jun 5, 2002
    Posts: 8,410

    Flat Ernie
    Tech Editor

    Excellent! Thanks for posting!
     
  4. Mullda
    Joined: Apr 12, 2006
    Posts: 303

    Mullda
    Member

    Nice work. Thanks for posting. I've been thinking about how to do the very same thing for my '37 PU.
     
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  5. Dirk35
    Joined: Mar 8, 2001
    Posts: 2,023

    Dirk35
    Member

    Seems simple tech posts fall back quite quickly. Bump in case some missed it.

    Oh yeah, it took me a few hours to do the 1st bracket (measured a bazalllion times), but about an hour each once I passed the learning curve.
     
  6. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,086

    bct
    Member

    thanks for takin the time to post this ....doing this job soon.
     

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