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Technical Tech question on new nickel/copper trans/fuel lines

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by TBonez, May 18, 2017.

  1. TBonez
    Joined: Dec 21, 2004
    Posts: 283

    TBonez
    Member

    I'm gettin ready to get the tubing for my transmission lines and a friend of mine told me about an aluminum copper alloy tubing, easier to bend n flare than the steel. Pricey plus trying to keep my build a traditional look. Anyone use this? Opinions to my concern on the look or am I just overthinking this


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  2. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 2,187

    RMONTY
    Member

    Are you talking about nicopp, also known as cunifer?
     
  3. TBonez
    Joined: Dec 21, 2004
    Posts: 283

    TBonez
    Member

    Yup, my bad. It's a nickel/copper alloy


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  4. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 18,035

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I use it all of the time, for everything, brake, fuel, cooler, still (you did not hear that from me).

    No reason not to use it. Properly flared and supported, it will last longer than the car.
     

  5. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 6,924

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

  6. captainjunk#2
    Joined: Mar 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,395

    captainjunk#2
    Member

    good to hear this i want to try this type of brake line also
     
  7. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,792

    tfeverfred
    Member

    I used it for my brake lines. The best thing to come along since the Cragar S/S mag.
     
  8. Engine man
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,476

    Engine man
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    I use stainless and glass in my "renewable alternate fuel ;)" production.
     
  9. 39cdan
    Joined: May 11, 2016
    Posts: 41

    39cdan

    Great stuff. Spend the money for a tube straightening hand die.


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  10. fordflambe
    Joined: Apr 9, 2007
    Posts: 545

    fordflambe
    Member

    I've used it on brake lines on my delivery and also my project car. The delivery has about 6,000 miles since i installed the cu/ni and i just inspected last week.........no runs, no drips, no errors..........

    I purchased a coil of 3/16 inch and invested in a tubing straightener and make my own straight pieces to start with. It is easier to tweak by hand if necessary to get that perfect install...........not to mention it looks much nicer than the green coated stuff in the parts house.......and it doesn't rust like an un-coated steel line.......I really like it!
     
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  11. H380
    Joined: Sep 20, 2015
    Posts: 460

    H380
    Member
    from Louisiana

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  12. David Gersic
    Joined: Feb 15, 2015
    Posts: 2,361

    David Gersic
    Member
    from DeKalb, IL

    $26 for 25 feet, on Amazon.

    https://www.amazon.com/Roll-Copper-...spons&keywords=copper+nickel+brake+line&psc=1

    Same thing, from local parts store, is $50.

    Good stuff, easy to work with. Did my Dakota it last year, and my '37 over the last couple of weeks.




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  13. Rocket Man 57
    Joined: May 21, 2016
    Posts: 33

    Rocket Man 57

    Been using it for years. Probably ran at least 1000 feet of it w/o any issues. You really have to try to kink it.
     
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  14. Very pleased with it. Polishes up nice too.
     
  15. stimpy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,547

    stimpy

    great stuff , use it on many O/T DD vehicles around here due to rustbelt salt, and cheaper than going stainless . ( for a while I was doing atleast a mid 90's early 00's GM car/truck a week and they were complete retubes , we called it "The great GM feeling", stepping on the brakes and they were not there ) I wish I could find the armor springs in that stuff , as All I can find is plated steel and it rusts and falls apart in about 3-4 years .
     
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  16. ydopen
    Joined: Mar 14, 2010
    Posts: 204

    ydopen
    Member

    pat59 likes this.
  17. I was wondering about that, The question is, how long does the polish last?
     
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  18. TBonez
    Joined: Dec 21, 2004
    Posts: 283

    TBonez
    Member

    Thanx for the link. I need the 5/16 for the trans lines n have found it on line for $60 inc. nuts. It's $48 here.


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  19. stimpy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,547

    stimpy

    I have both stainless ( I get in bulk but is still pricey and does not look right on the greenish tubing) and the regular plated which kind of looks better as its more satin colored . I try to run stainless with stainless , plated steel with steel . I was thinking on trying to find some olive green epoxy paint maybe that will help .
     
  20. metalman
    Joined: Dec 30, 2006
    Posts: 3,280

    metalman
    Member

    I use Nicopp on all our projects unless we're doing it in polished stainless. Someone above said you have to try real hard to kink it, that is my biggest complaint with the stuff. My standard benders will kink it if I'm not real careful, the bigger the tube the bigger the issue. Matter of fact on 3/8 I've been having better luck with a hardware store spring bender around an old pulley the a normal bender. I do like how it flares and how it looks, I just wipe it down with Wenol and it looks great.
    Questain: Has anyone used it with AN style fittings with the 45 degree single flare?
     
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  21. I also love this stuff, but have one worry about it. How do you know it is the correct stuff if you find it in a swap meet? I've always passed on the swap meet stuff, because I don't know of a way to be sure it is the correct alloy and not something cheap that will fail at brake line working pressure. (not that I don't trust swap meet vendors) LOL
     
  22. stimpy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,547

    stimpy

    you don't unless the seller also has a place of business too ( I have a few that do swap meets and have teaser sales to draw you to the shop ) . with brake line I only buy from a hard store with a address or a manufactuer , I won't take chances cutting cost when it comes to human life , I want a paper trail . ( working in hazmat transportation we want to know the parts manufacturer /supplier ) even with online stores if they do not post a hard address ( not a p.o. box or UPS store box ) ,I will not buy from as several of them I found out why they do not have a hard address or even phone number as they are a no returns policy place , makes you wonder if they are really selling what they say they are .
     
  23. stimpy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,547

    stimpy

    its soft so it seals nice . actually easier than annealed stainless , but it has limited removal as it will flatten/thin out with multiple tightening . and breaks the cone off at the base of the tube sleeve , if it was a coupler joint that stays together and hardly taken apart it should work great . but a application where its taken apart often I would go steel or stainless .
     
  24. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,792

    tfeverfred
    Member

    I think I read somewhere that the two shouldn't be mixed.
     
  25. Stimpy, I was hoping to hear that you could dip it toothpaste and if it turned green it was good stuff or some other cool method. LOL I agree that this is one of those times/places that getting the "good stuff" is way more important than saving a buck.
    I took a chance and bought some from a vendor at the Iola swapmeet and have seen him there and at other swapmeets many times over the years. I suspect it is good stuff, but I think I will devise a pressure test before I use it in a brake system. I can always use it on vacuum lines, etc.
     
  26. stimpy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,547

    stimpy

    I know of a couple of chemical tests but carrying Nitric or Piranha acid with you is a little dangerous ..

    otherwise you have to get a chunk and destructive test it (fold it to see if it splits , bend it , flare it with gorilla force to see if the cone will split , ( if you see a seam drop it and run as the real stuff ( cupro nickel ) is die extruded .

    also cupro nickel will have a thicker wall compaired to steel due to the burst strength ,

    most ( steel ) is made from flatstock that is shaped . welded and roll died thru a mandrel , they might have a crisscross or barbershop pole marking around them . ( the zinc passivated ( green lines)) are made this way ( some times the rolling/weld is seen sometimes its not because of the acid treatment will etch metal and highlight the weld or the compacted metal )
     
  27. Candfury
    Joined: Dec 14, 2014
    Posts: 23

    Candfury
    Member

    AN fittings are 37 degree flare,I think SAE fittings are 45 degree.
     
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  28. metalman
    Joined: Dec 30, 2006
    Posts: 3,280

    metalman
    Member

    Duh. Your right, brain fart.
     
  29. Any recommendations on which straightener to buy? They all seem to be on the expensive side and I'd rather not make a mistake when I place my order.
     

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