Register now to get rid of these ads!

Tech Month~~Home made metal shaping tools

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by jhnarial, Dec 27, 2008.

  1. Docco
    Joined: Mar 23, 2007
    Posts: 286

    Docco
    Member
    from Ippy

    Ok cool so different sizes will work but the bigger the better. I'll use the stump i have and make the biggest dish i can without sacrificing the stumps strength on the edges. No point wasting a the good stump i have just because its a little small.
     
  2. Jimv
    Joined: Dec 5, 2001
    Posts: 2,927

    Jimv
    Member

    what a great post this is!! This is what its all about!!
    Jimv
     
  3. jhnarial,

    Is there a reason to place the dish off center in the stump?
     
  4. 5150merc
    Joined: Jul 29, 2008
    Posts: 153

    5150merc
    Member
    from oregon

    it might be off center to give you a flat spot for hammering?
     
  5. jhnarial
    Joined: Mar 18, 2007
    Posts: 410

    jhnarial
    Member
    from MISSOURI

    Metalman

    If you can't find a hardwood stump you can make one out of hardwood pieces and glue them together.That is what I used at first,it worked real good except I didn't leave enough material around the perimeter and It started to chip on me.

    20071117_1-1.JPG

    Picture.jpg

    5150 merc

    I had two bat hammers but gave them both to friends after I bought my shaping hammer.I did drive a wedge at the top.I made mine the same way Tim described.

    Docco

    Just make sure there is enough meat left on the stump so it doesn't crack like the one I just showed did.

    Mac the yankee

    I placed the dish off center for two reasons,you want it close to the edge so you can get your fingers out from underneath your panel your shrinking.I also had planed on putting some different size dishes on the stump.Not sure if I will now I love having the flat surface for beating on.

    Tim if this tach cup would work for you,you can have it.Me and Bill were just drinking some beer and messing around.Plus I wanted to help Ranunculous.
     
  6. dechrome
    Joined: Dec 23, 2004
    Posts: 303

    dechrome
    Member

    Here are some homemade tools for metalshaping.
    The E wheel is basically 3/16 steel welded in a box section with the lower anvil holder made from a semi driveshaft spline and yoke. A planishing hammer and other tools bolt to flanges welded to the sides to save space. Other tools include various hammers and a double ended shrinker/ planishing hammer.
    deChrome
     

    Attached Files:

    couvy likes this.
  7. beaulieu
    Joined: Mar 24, 2007
    Posts: 362

    beaulieu
    Member
    from So Cal

    more info and more pics on the double ended shrinker/ planishing hammer please

    thanks

    Beaulieu
     
  8. jhnarial
    Joined: Mar 18, 2007
    Posts: 410

    jhnarial
    Member
    from MISSOURI

    I want to know more too.
     
  9. Docco
    Joined: Mar 23, 2007
    Posts: 286

    Docco
    Member
    from Ippy

    Thanks for all the help, i'll post pics when its finished.
     
  10. Docco
    Joined: Mar 23, 2007
    Posts: 286

    Docco
    Member
    from Ippy

    Heres the block of wood i have with a 6inch circle scribed into it. I'll let it dry for a couple of days before i cut it out.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. tdoty
    Joined: Jun 21, 2006
    Posts: 822

    tdoty
    Member

    Dechrome,

    Paul, I thought that was you! The tool pics prove it! Nice work on the Ford shown in the sheetmetal shaping thread.....but for some reason i thought you were working on a Merc. I must be getting old.............

    Johnny, here's a guy who thinks outside the box and sees tools in the most unusual places! i never would have thought of using slip yokes and output shafts that way, and I'm a fairly creative dude!

    Tim D.
     
  12. Dyce
    Joined: Sep 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,808

    Dyce
    Member

    Johnny I missed this thread. Here is a picture of the tank I used for a stump.
    [​IMG]
    The tanks sit in dirt and water. Over the years they get rough and pitted. I chucked mine up in the lathe and ground and sanded a long time to get it this good (it could be better).

    Anouther low buck tool you can get are these weld on pipe caps.
    [​IMG]
    They come in many sizes.
    This is a model a axle I used to test a dropping fixture. I have it done now and am waiting on lower wheels. I ended up boxing most of it in because it was to flimsy. Here is a teaser.... I'll try to get a camera to the shop this week for a updated picture.
    [​IMG]
    Jeff
     
  13. tdoty
    Joined: Jun 21, 2006
    Posts: 822

    tdoty
    Member


    SWEET! Ya need to do that with a Peterbilt axle! I was considering making a planishing hammer out of a '53 F-100 axle..................I still have that axle, hmmmmmmm.

    Tim D.
     
  14. maddog
    Joined: Sep 3, 2006
    Posts: 693

    maddog
    Member
    from So Cal

    Dechrome, I would love to see more of that double ended power thing hammer shrinker or whatever it is. I think I need one of those.
     
  15. Dyce
    Joined: Sep 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,808

    Dyce
    Member

    Took alot of time with the rosebud:rolleyes:. Lots of flex, I didn't think it would be bad but it was. I boxed the back half up to the kick in the axle with 1/4" plate. I have a set of 1X3 wheels coming from Hoosier for it. I needed a wheel with more clearance and narrow wheels.

    I could have pulled the axle out of my Anglia. It would be an English Ford wheel then:p
     
  16. BuiltFerComfort
    Joined: Jan 24, 2007
    Posts: 1,620

    BuiltFerComfort
    Member

    Head up 44 past Cuba to the La Jara / Regina area for hardwoods. Juniper, cedar, old growth spruce. You just need a chainsaw & some owners permission (bring a beer or two and a good attitude). Might be something in a woodpile pre-aged for you - print out a picture or two of what you want. Nice folks up that way, or used to be.
     
  17. dechrome
    Joined: Dec 23, 2004
    Posts: 303

    dechrome
    Member

    For those that want more picts. of the double ended shrinker,here are what I have.
    The major parts are slip joints, with the motor driving thtough a 5 to one reducer.
    It is a little slow for pro but ok for my use.
    the thumbnail shrinking dies are not for this machine but illustrate the shape required.
    deChrome
     

    Attached Files:

  18. dechrome
    Joined: Dec 23, 2004
    Posts: 303

    dechrome
    Member

    While I am on a roll, here are pictures of a slip roll ane a tinker tool used for contour templates. Also a shot of the Ewheel graduated dial for repeat adjustments.
     

    Attached Files:

  19. Brad54
    Joined: Apr 15, 2004
    Posts: 6,006

    Brad54
    Member
    from Atl Ga

    I don't have any pics, but I've made pretty good use of pine blocks from left-over pinewood derby cars for bumping things back into shape--oil pans, valve covers, etc. I use them in conjunction with my shot bag.
    Hardwood is usually used for metal shaping, but the pine is sacrificial, and it absorbs more. Seems to work out the dents pretty well.
    Shapes easy on the disc grinder/belt sander too.
    Any chunk of lumber will work--handy for when you need a particular shape or need it to fit a particular area.

    -Brad
     
  20. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,725

    stealthcruiser
    Member

    O K ,dechrome,......You've done it!!!! Gonna' need a closer pic of the shrinker/stretcher doodad, specifically where the shafts, and I am guessing, the eccentrics, are all located.........Gotta see how that all came together, and what was used, If You please......
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  21. cabriolethiboy
    Joined: Jun 16, 2002
    Posts: 864

    cabriolethiboy
    Member

    Paul;
    I thought that was your stuff. I am really impressed. We've talked about this before, but I would like to set up a small tour of your place some time this winter. Probably 4 to 6 guys. I love homebuilt stuff and different ways people do things. I still have your card and I will call you in a few days.
    Steve Hardin
     
  22. Simply awesome, love all the info! Now just gotta get some bats and a hardwood stump. Thanks for the inspiration!
     
  23. dechrome
    Joined: Dec 23, 2004
    Posts: 303

    dechrome
    Member

    Stealthcruser,
    The eccentric is 3/4 in dia turned 1/8 in offset on a 1 in shaft and a 1/2 in dia turned on the end of the shaft for an outboard bushing. An olite bushing is slipped onto the eccentric to give a floating bearing for the splined U joint yoke with the ears cut off.
    The stroke is only 1/4 in and there is no return spring so no eccentric contact until metal is inserted in gap.
    The lower tool holder has an adjustment screw from below.
    I hope this is clear enough.

    deChrome
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2008
  24. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,725

    stealthcruiser
    Member

    Thanks, Bro....Thats pretty damn clear, now I have to sit down and draw
    it!!!!!! Thanks for the info!!! You did say the u-joints/ slip joint thingys are all big rig castoffs, correct?
     
  25. tdoty
    Joined: Jun 21, 2006
    Posts: 822

    tdoty
    Member

    Found my pics, finally!

    First 3 are my little reciprocating machine - some call it a power hammer, but it's not.

    100_3648.JPG 100_3712.JPG 100_3713.JPG


    Here's the homemade thumbnail dies that go with the above machine. 5/8" bolt shanks and some 3/4"x2" 4140 bar stock:
    thumbnail1.jpg thumbnail2.jpg


    Slappers anyone? The first 2 are wood slappers made from pallet pieces, third in line is a pair of steel slappers made from a C-10 spring:
    100_2997.JPG 100_3000.JPG metal_00014.JPG


    Need to put a flange on a part? Here's one of my favorite tools for the job. Been using this one since '04. Just a chunk of 1/2" square steel with a groove cut with a cutoff wheel. Mark your line, then start pulling it up, a little at a time. Finish it up with a hammer and dolly.
    100_3038.JPG

    The pipe tee hammer I mentioned in a previous post. It's as simple as it looks. I drilled a hole in the top of the tee and ran a drywall screw down into the handle....just in case.
    000_0010.jpg

    Cheap and easy planishing hammer. This one is just a little guy made for an experiment.
    100_2904.JPG

    My cheap and easy e-wheel........well, it was cheap. The majority of the frame is 1"x3"x16ga tube, laminated into a 3x5" tube. The balance of the tubing is 3" square.
    100_3633.JPG

    Finally, one of my beater bag stands along with homemade beater bags. Sold this one not long after the pic was taken. My current one has a hammer hanger on the center tube. Discarded disc blades, 2" pipe couplers and a section of 2" pipe makes the basic stand. The "post dolly" arm is 1 1/2" tube.
    metal_00068.JPG metal_00087.jpg metal_00096.jpg

    Tim D.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
    falconsprint63 and rytang like this.
  26. HotRod33
    Joined: Oct 5, 2008
    Posts: 2,245

    HotRod33
    Member
    from MO

    I have used a bat on a car before but not like this....great info....
     
    rytang likes this.
  27. You should post a thread on building one of these tools, nice.
     
  28. jhnarial
    Joined: Mar 18, 2007
    Posts: 410

    jhnarial
    Member
    from MISSOURI

    Thanks for sharing your homemade tools ideas!

    I think it is about time I start thinking about a reciprocating machine.I might have a few questions for you Tim when I do.My to do list is getting pretty long so it might be awhile.


    Hotrod 33

    I guess that would still be considered a form of metal-shaping:D:D.


    Anybody else have some homemade tools to share?I can always add a new tool to my to do list:D.
     
  29. tdoty
    Joined: Jun 21, 2006
    Posts: 822

    tdoty
    Member


    Thanks! After I get a new camera (mine died last night during the photography of my billet bezels), maybe I can do a quasi-tech piece. Quasi-tech as in I'll do up some drawings and tear mine down to explain it a little better. I ain't building another one of those right now, even though I do have a good sized piece of 3/4" plate :rolleyes:

    I'll look through my pics and see if I have any good stuff from the first one I built. It wasn't as pretty, but it worked. That one was all tube with no special parts at all.

    People have asked, no, I don't have any plans for either design, they were both seat of the pants engineering and made with what I had one hand and could scrounge....well, I had to buy the pulleys on the yellow one. The first had a 1/3hp furnace blower motor on it. The yellow has a 1hp motor on it. the first one had a tube-in-tube slide design with UHMW sliders added in. The yellow one uses a tool slide to guide the ram.

    Here's the first one:
    100_3609.JPG

    Here's the business end. I used a similar design on both machines, but made different ways.
    100_3584.jpg

    The first one had a variety of eccentric designs. In its first incarnation, it was built with nothing but a drill press, a chop saw and a welder. Ok, there was some grinding too. The first design eccentric was a cut off piece of shaft with an off-center hole drilled in it and a threaded hole drilled in the end of the shaft. The next couple of variants are harder to explain - especially without pics, so I won't even try.

    The eccentric on the yellow machine was made by sticking a piece of scrap steel on one jaw of the 3-jaw chuck and turning the 1-inch shaft down to fit inside the bearing. The stroke comes out to around 3/16".

    Both designs use a yoke over the bearing to lift it back up. Easier than a connecting rod. Might not be as good, but it's been working for me since '05.

    That's it in a nutshell.

    Johnny, fire away with the questions.....I'm a virtual fountain of useless information :rolleyes:

    Tim D.
     
  30. Brad54
    Joined: Apr 15, 2004
    Posts: 6,006

    Brad54
    Member
    from Atl Ga

    I've got one of these too, but rather than marking the line on your piece and inserting the tool up to it, and having to keep running that same line, I put a couple slits in the tool and marked them with number stamps-- One is 1/4-inch, one is 3/8-inch, and on the other end of the same tool is a 1/2-inch slit. That way you decide how wide of a flange you need and just bottom the tool onto the work piece.
    The one I have right now is made of 1/4-inch stock--being thin, it allows me to bend a flange around a bend. For instance, if you take a rounded edge and want a flange on it, the thin tool will make the radius. Work slow and "walk" it around, and you can work the metal that would normally need to be shrunk.

    -Brad
     
    jetnow1 likes this.

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.