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T5 to 348 pilot (input shaft) bushing

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by dolsen37, Apr 7, 2013.

  1. dolsen37
    Joined: Mar 7, 2006
    Posts: 182

    dolsen37
    Member
    from Nebraska

    O.K. T5 or any manual transmission specialists I have a question for you guys. I have a 1961 348 that is being mated with a W/C T5-S10 transmission. I traded for this car 32 Ford 3 window and both the engine and transmission have been rebuilt. I decided to pull the transmission off to make sure everything was torqued and to make sure all of the clutch mechanism were o.k. I noticed that there was no pilot shaft bushing in place in the crank shaft. I purchased a bushing for a 1961 348 and that is where the fun began. The bushings OD was too large for the end of the crank (fit perfect on the transmission). No problem I researched and tried to find a bushing with smaller OD, no success. I took the bushing to the machine shop and had them turn it down to the OD of the crank hole (used an electronic dial caliper for the measurement). Brought the bushing home and it installed fairly easily ( I did have to use a brass dowel/punch and made sure not to damage the busing). Apparently I did not have the bushing turned down enough as the input hole has now shrunk down and does not accept the transmissions input shaft. NOW TO MY QUESTION, HOW PERFECT DOES THE ID NEED TO BE IN RELATION TO MY TRANSMISSIONS INPUT SHAFT?[/B] I have taken my dremel tool with a 120 sandpaper drum and "reamed" out the ID and the transmission slid right in. I am only testing at this time and can easily buy a new bushing and take back to machine shop. Currently the transmission fits nicely but the fit is not as "snug" as it was when the bushing was new. HOW MUCH PLAY CAN THERE BE IN THE PILOT BUSHING VS TRANSMISSION PILOT SHAFT? DO I GO FOR IT OR HAVE THE BUSHING RE-MACHINED? By the way I know the right answer (re-machine) but I am getting lazy and frustrated. I have heard of guys in the old days running with no pilot bushing with manual transmissions.
     
  2. The bushing you bought is brass?or oilite?,,do not need a snug fit to tranny input shaft,I am from the old days and never heard of NOT running a bushing,,,just remember that the bushing is always turning when engine is running,,input shat does not turn with clutch depressed..Now you figgure the "Snugness" you think is correct
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2013
  3. dolsen37
    Joined: Mar 7, 2006
    Posts: 182

    dolsen37
    Member
    from Nebraska

    Thanks for the reply and I stand corrected oilite bushing. Good news if the bushing and pilot shaft do not need to be a tight or precise fit. I would say that it fits pretty good now but a little more room than stock. Did not know how much the pilot shaft would move around if it moves at all. Have not messed with manual transmission stuff for 20 years or so.
     
  4. brokenspoke
    Joined: Jul 26, 2005
    Posts: 2,911

    brokenspoke
    Member

    I know in the old days the SBC engines, the crank hole where the bushing goes came from the factory with two sizes depending on if it was a auto transmission or standard....The auto engine took a smaller bushing (OD)...I have searched and there is no listing for the smaller bushing ....maybe a old time auto parts store might have a listing...
     

  5. dolsen37
    Joined: Mar 7, 2006
    Posts: 182

    dolsen37
    Member
    from Nebraska

    Yes, I think this is my problem. The crank is most likely from a car that had an auto transmission and it has the smaller O.D. hole. Thanks for the reply.

    Dan

     
  6. 48 Chubby
    Joined: Apr 29, 2008
    Posts: 1,014

    48 Chubby
    Member Emeritus

    If you got a perfect fit how precise would it be after 20,000 miles in town?

    Pilot bushings have a fairly long service life, so even a slightly loose one should be fine.
     

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