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Features T roadster gow jobs.

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by David Mazza, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 46

    David Mazza

    A spacer a little over a quarter inch needs to be placed between the top of the wishbone and the bottom of the axle.
     
    kidcampbell71 likes this.
  2. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 189

    guitarguy
    Member

    I think I used a 5/16" spacer if I remember right. I cut mine from plate steel. My spacer is currently between the top of the axle and perch. But it could be changed around easily enough.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
  3. My neighbor did this to one of his roadsters maybe 12 years ago, he was King Of the Hill once here in Long Beach at the annual hill climb, and I thought he said he just added threads to the perch? I've never done it, just trying to remember what he said. It was a quick and easy way to lower the car too, he used a stock A axle like guitarguy.
     
  4. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 46

    David Mazza

    I used the difference in the perch area of the t axle vrs the a axle. I came up with needing a space .263 thick and .685 Id. Anything over that is fine as long as the castle nut engages the the cooter pin hole. One could also cut the threads longer as well! Stay tuned when I get my engine to see what happens at the other end of the wishbone!
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2019
  5. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 189

    guitarguy
    Member

    Sometimes the obvious solution eludes us. I never thought about just cutting more threads in the perch. But the only issue I see with that---at least for me, is you'd have to turn the axle pin of the perch down before doing so as the threaded area and axle pin diameters are different.

    The spacer seemed quite easier to do. I know I first tried a 1/4" (.250") thick spacer first, and it worked, but you'd have to drill another hole for the cotter pin to go through...If you wanted the cotter pin to go through the castleated portion of the nut. The 5/16" (.312")spacer puts the nut where it needs to be for the cotter pin to go through as it should in the stock location.

    Hope I conveyed that info properly...it sounded good in my head.

    EDIT: I just went and measured, It was a 5/16" spacer I made, NOT a 3/8". I have corrected my posts to reflect that for anyone in the future.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
  6. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 46

    David Mazza

    8192863B-A65D-4DFC-8AB5-F24D4F7A4FEE.jpeg Wonder what could be in this crate sitting at guitarguys work place?
     
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  7. open it, open it!!!!
     
    David Mazza likes this.
  8. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,025

    The37Kid
    Member

    Bought this 23-25 T Touring front half in two different locations. Rough enough to cut in half and build a Lakes Modified. Fun finding stuff, even better when you can sell it to a friend on the HAMB who will build it a lot quicker than me. Bob DSCF4225.JPG DSCF4226.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
  9. ROCKER77
    Joined: Jun 30, 2008
    Posts: 493

    ROCKER77
    Member

    artwork-101.jpg

    NO NO...Don't open it...we have all watched Creepshow we know whats in "The Crate"
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
    David Mazza likes this.
  10. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 46

    David Mazza

    I want to open it so bad but another hamber has it at his place. Hard to believe in this day and age someone will help you the way guitarguy has! I don’t think I will be able to sleep until it gets here, too excited! And even when it gets here I will probably sit in it all night making engine noises.
     
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  11. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,025

    The37Kid
    Member

    That is a really nice T body, is it going through a professional trucking company? Bob
     
    David Mazza likes this.
  12. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 189

    guitarguy
    Member

    Yes, the seller built the crate and shipped it through a trucking company. Being trucking companies kill the pricing on residential deliveries---especially with liftgate service, I had David ship it to my workplace. Its loaded on my car trailer ready for delivery on Sunday. Sunday is going to be a great day!

    I peeked and opened it! :cool:
    It appears to be a nice body that needs some TLC. But that's why they call them projects, right? But it is a real steel Henry Ford body.
     
  13. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,025

    The37Kid
    Member

    DSCF4374.JPG How's the wood?

    Bob
     
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  14. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 46

    David Mazza

    It’s going to need wood, and some metal work but I can tell you for the number of model t runabouts built from 1917-1925 they are super hard to find in any condition at all! Here’s a sneak peak guitarguy sent me last night. Unfortunately that dark red dust is the shape the wood is in. Like he said it’s a project, but it will be done right and I will keep this car forever so if I get a tad deep into it I won’t feel to bad. If Isky can keep a t roadster forever why can’t I! 4641AC6B-2362-42FD-B3E6-9F8613C5C72B.jpeg E1C56B63-247F-4CC3-BBEF-51CC27D9CA8D.jpeg
     
    brEad, Jalopy Joker, Paul and 9 others like this.
  15. Very cool! Looking forward to your build.
     
  16. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,025

    The37Kid
    Member

    DSCF4390.JPG Just looked at Don Lang's catalog wood kits are rather costly, but key to having a proper body. Bob
     
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  17. GZ
    Joined: Jan 2, 2007
    Posts: 938

    GZ
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Detroit

    Saw this picture from Hershey on the AACA site. Looks like a nice roadster. Any idea who's it is, how much, etc? I like it! SAM_8215.jpg.59634a584e9eea190ef228dec55d6db9.jpg
     
  18. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,025

    The37Kid
    Member

    That was a nice car, all George Riley multi head and side cover. It ran the Race of Gentlemen, had front brakes. looks like a Connecticut plate on the trailer. Bob
     
  19. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 46

    David Mazza

    DDB6C0F6-2E62-4501-89CC-0A577CFAFF52.jpeg 01C602D5-281B-4CA8-96C5-EBA8776225BB.jpeg 63A79898-6195-447A-9FA0-31AB28299B48.jpeg D4CFA1DB-1D56-42E7-A343-4DBE511013BE.jpeg 9ADC9800-F765-4346-A1A0-F001D253B682.jpeg I am going to use 21 inch model a wheels on my car. The front will use a model a axle so easy there. I will just bolt to the model a hubs. I have the rear figured out as well. I am keeping the model t rear axle and will make my own adapter to bolt model a wheels to bolt on model t hubs. More on those latter. But the biggest problem I have is the fact that I don’t like the look of the 21 inch model a wheel! I am using them for there tall size and narrow tire that will look best on a t that is lowered but not lowered a lot like the Aldrich roadster. No way I can afford buffalo or early Dayton or pasco or simplex accessory wheels as they are super expensive these days! My solution is an old one! I will cover the wheels with something done in expensive cars and early racing car from the teens and 20s. I will make aluminum disc covers. Most of the disc from this era were spun like a modern moon disc. A moon disc wouldn’t really fit my application so I’d have to make my own. Unfortunately again I can’t spin large sheet of aluminum and having that done is also out of a model t enthusiasts budget. All until I found a car which they built aluminum cones overlapping on itself and riveted. So I set out to see if it’s possible for myself to make some for a model a wheel. So far I have perfected my templates. It took many many tries as there are three dimensions in which to accommodate in precision but it is possible. Now I can order up some aluminum. I also made a rear disc to hide wheel completely. The rear will just be made of sheet steel to keep costs down and painted semi gloss black. The disc will be held to the wheel with a carriage bolts passing through the front and through to the rear disc. It will be held in place with spring tension and easy to remove nut. Here is the inspiration and the final templates.
     
  20. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 14,406

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That is slick!
     
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  21. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 46

    David Mazza

    C7EBFCA1-2EEB-40BB-AE8E-FE45B727BAD2.jpeg A667CC9C-9421-4248-BD96-8DF1511088DF.jpeg I finally own a real steel ford roadster. With guitarguy and bigcheese we unboxed and moved the new roadster into its forever home. It will need more patches than I hoped and all new wood but for a guy in Massachusetts it’s as solid as oak compared to what most model t projects I see around here are! More pics to follow as I break it down make repairs and begin building the wood structure back up once I build a good work height stand for my chassis to attach to.
     
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  22. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,025

    The37Kid
    Member

    Nice! Looks like some insulation will make winter work more comfortable. Bob
     
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  23. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 46

    David Mazza

    14693323-E569-4956-95F3-2EDE1C4AC75A.jpeg C4C1687C-CA1F-402E-A999-39E57C8DEC88.jpeg For sure. I have the insulation just need to get off my ass about it. I just hate insulating, miserable and itchy but worth it! Here are a few more pics of the day. After we had a nice lunch out! We need more guys into super early modified cars in this area!
     
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  24. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 189

    guitarguy
    Member

    Dave, Thank You for a great lunch, your hospitality, and generosity with your old parts. It was great seeing you after a couple of years, I had fun having a part in this. It is very apparent our projects have a lot in common.

    Did you sit in it and make car noises yet?:D

    BigCheese(Dave), it was great meeting you. You really need to get started on yours.

    I think we all had fun today for a few hours.
     
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  25. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 189

    guitarguy
    Member

    A couple that I took.

    Mazza 1.JPG

    Mazza 2.JPG
     
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  26. Jalopy Joker
    Joined: Sep 3, 2006
    Posts: 23,452

    Jalopy Joker
    Member

    SAM_0738.JPG SAM_0737.JPG SAM_0729.JPG SAM_0730.JPG SAM_0731.JPG Sacramento, CA International Auto Show
     
  27. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,659

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    1933 Dancing Lady gow.jpg 1933 Dancing Lady gow 02.jpg

    A couple of ridiculously small stills from Dancing Lady, a 1933 film featuring everybody and their brother (including Joan Crawford, seen here) and this gowwed-up T on a shortened wheelbase.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
    Squablow, gsnort, David Mazza and 2 others like this.
  28. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,659

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    1940 Flivver Races, Walla Walla, Washington 02.jpg 1940 Flivver Races, Walla Walla, Washington 01.jpg
    The Flivver Races at Walla Walla, Washington, 1940.
     
  29. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,659

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    Speedy Aunt Molly.jpg 1940 Texaco.jpg
    Notice both "Speedy Aunt Molly" and the Texaco truck have similar Sky Chief signs on the door. Seems to have been The Thing circa 1938-'40.
     
    Squablow, gsnort, lurker mick and 4 others like this.

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