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Features T roadster gow jobs.

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by David Mazza, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. ClarkH
    Joined: Jul 21, 2010
    Posts: 1,142

    ClarkH
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I did the same thing on mine. As far as I'm concerned, those components date to the later gow-era and are acceptable. At least to me. My main consideration was that I was building a driver, not an artifact.
     
  2. RyanAK
    Joined: Sep 7, 2019
    Posts: 212

    RyanAK
    Member

    This thread is great. I've reread it several times as I'm researching and planning an achievable pre-WWII build, and I'm taking a ton of inspiration from the prototype and build photos. I like the early stuff, but plan on semi-daily driving the car... and I don't think I'm up for a T drivetrain. So I'm currently thinking about a fendered T body (roadster, touring...) on an A chassis. Still 'Gow', or does the Model A frame and drivetrain push it into a 'Supe Job', 'Hot Iron' or other designation? I see a few T chassis running A bangers... I'm still researching but the fabrication and alteration to accomplish that seems a bit beyond my skills for a first build.
     
  3. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,691

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    I think the big thing is not to sweat it. Putting together a collection of pre-war parts into something drivable is cool and it's got to please you. The terminology is something that Clayton and I more or less imposed on the different eras based on how we saw the evolution happen.

    The actual term "gow" persisted long after 1934 or wherever we said the gow era ended. To us, a gow was more or less a speedster but with stock bodywork. In practice, when Hot Rod first came out in 1948, actor Robert Stack (he was a rodder, long story) asked Pete Peterson why he didn't call it "Gow Job" since people knew what that meant.

    That indicates the term had a lot of currency even much later. In fact, the name of the magazine is probably responsible for solidifying the term hot rod to describe a car modified for speed.

    Put a lot of "A" parts into the mix, run V-8 wheels, and you naturally drift into looking like you're from 1937 or so. We termed those cars "hot irons" but you don't have to call it that. It's just semantics and an attempt to impose some order on the chaos of history.

    It'll be a cool car, no matter what you call it.
     
    RyanAK, ClarkH, guitarguy and 3 others like this.
  4. Blackbob
    Joined: Nov 19, 2008
    Posts: 140

    Blackbob
    Member

    125075285_3841051202606149_5741649259094719737_n.jpg 124864913_3841051182606151_8311012588487916865_n.jpg 125066436_3841051385939464_7636356252311719753_n.jpg i made a little progress on my "Gin Runner" last weekend, pushed it outside to get a better view.. I plan to change the rear tray back to a shortened touring style tub for somewhere the dogs can ride!
     
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  5. flatheadpete
    Joined: Oct 29, 2003
    Posts: 10,211

    flatheadpete
    Member
    from Burton, MI

    ^^^That looks like fun!
     
  6. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 73

    David Mazza

    .

    I’d say the best option is to keep it simple. Take a running and driving model a chassis. Leave it alone but lower it as much as possible, dropped axle, reversed eye springs and same in rear probably with a model t spring. Pinch rear of chassis to fit under t body and bolt a t body down. Keep the tires tall and skinny and you’ll have something that is basically a correct gow. You could even use juice brakes if that’s what your more comfortable with.
     
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  7. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 566

    guitarguy
    Member

    I couldn't agree more. That is by far the fastest and easiest way to get to the result. No need to start doing stupid stuff like we did, LOL. Maybe we both went a little overboard in our ideas, but the end results will still be nice. I can't wait to drive!
     
    Blackbob and Dannerr like this.
  8. RyanAK
    Joined: Sep 7, 2019
    Posts: 212

    RyanAK
    Member

    Thanks, man. I've been thinking on this a long time. The nomenclature of "gow", "iron", "supe" isn't as important to me as staying true to a period. Generally "pre-war" and more specifically early '30s. And I appreciate the work and thought that's put in to try to impose some order to the chaos!

    Well... you basically nailed my current 'recipe'! I want simple and basic for this car and a lowered A chassis with a T body feels 'right'.

    Pinching the frame... that's something I hadn't considered...

    And I want to keep mechanical brakes. At least initially. I'm in a rural area and I feel like I can put the work into setting up the mechanicals to work for me.

    The builds here are inspiring and the time you all put in to documenting the builds is appreciated. The photos really help to visualize how all the bits work together and make it easier to come up with a plan. Thanks to all for that!
     
  9. RyanAK
    Joined: Sep 7, 2019
    Posts: 212

    RyanAK
    Member

    [​IMG]
    1940 - Genoa, NV. Gow, buckaroo, Gow!
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2020
  10. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 73

    David Mazza

  11. It is in the capable hands of Mr. Peter Stevens, whom - among many things - is one of the designers of the McLaren F1 supercar; https://stateofspeed.com/2019/04/30/f1-designer-peter-stevens-takes-his-t-black/
     
  12. 282doorUK
    Joined: Mar 6, 2015
    Posts: 121

    282doorUK

    Not sure if it has been posted before or whether it's relevant to this thread, but this pic turned up on FB today captioned "Student vehicles at Stanford University in 1917."

    4B353894-1A74-4DD9-9C6C-7381B5CA985C.jpeg
     
  13. RyanAK
    Joined: Sep 7, 2019
    Posts: 212

    RyanAK
    Member

    Thanks, David! That’s a great build and answers my question about narrowing the rear of the frame. Does an A frame get narrowed for all T bodies or just the earlier bodies? Would a ‘27-‘28 roadster also need the pinch?
     
  14. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 73

    David Mazza

    Good question, I’m not sure. If you poke around online I think there is a line drawing of the 26-27 t roadster with dimensions. The 26-27 roadster seems to be easier to find if that encourages you. I got my roadster body a year ago and I’ve seen maybe three bodies come up since, @guitarguy being one just an hour from me(lucky devil!)
     
    guitarguy likes this.
  15. David Mazza
    Joined: Aug 25, 2018
    Posts: 73

    David Mazza

    35D61B4F-2206-442A-9AE1-E336008CBE00.jpeg EC305204-F74F-42B6-B027-0A2D550CF996.jpeg 35D61B4F-2206-442A-9AE1-E336008CBE00.jpeg EC305204-F74F-42B6-B027-0A2D550CF996.jpeg Here is a dimensions drawing for 26-27 t roadster body and also for ford model a frame
     
  16. RyanAK
    Joined: Sep 7, 2019
    Posts: 212

    RyanAK
    Member

    I love this place. That helps a lot David. I do hope I’ll be able to contribute back to the community once I get into a build. Thanks so much!

    PS - after a quick review... It actually looks like a ‘26-‘27 T body almost directly bolts to an A frame... NIFTY. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2020
  17. Well - the two rear crossmember bolts sort of do. But that's it...
     
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  18. RyanAK
    Joined: Sep 7, 2019
    Posts: 212

    RyanAK
    Member

    If I had a chassis and body here, I’m sure it would be obvious... but right now I’m building in my imagination so I’m trying to gather as much information as possible to make a determination of which direction to go. So any experience shared is very much appreciated!
     
    Dannerr likes this.
  19. I can take a ton of pictures when you need.
     
    Dannerr likes this.
  20. @hotrodfil, in case @RyanAK doesn't know your Ts-on-A-frames track record (an to refresh my own memory! ;-) ), could you please list the ones so far? :)
     
    hotrodfil likes this.
  21. They do seem to be multiplying.
     
    SR100 and Dannerr like this.
  22. fortynut
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,038

    fortynut
    Member

    I had always heard them called 'Strip Downs'. Another of those suggestive terms that might lead to a 'Gow Job'. Who knows?
     
  23. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,691

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    Strip-down/cut-down seems to have been a very prevalent term when these cars were being built the first time. To the modern user, though, I've always felt it might not be sufficiently descriptive, whereas "gow job" is such a unique term, the listener either knows enough to be able to picture the style, or will be confused enough to ask for an explanation.
     
    Dannerr, guitarguy and kevinrevin like this.
  24. 1952henry
    Joined: Jan 8, 2006
    Posts: 892

    1952henry
    Member


    Nice job on those seats.
     
  25. RyanAK
    Joined: Sep 7, 2019
    Posts: 212

    RyanAK
    Member

    I’m having a nice chat via PM with @hotrodfil about his cars. Great stuff. His track record is impressive! Several other guys have PM’d with great advice. Much appreciated all around!
     
    brEad and Dannerr like this.
  26. BeaverMatt
    Joined: Jun 17, 2013
    Posts: 35

    BeaverMatt
    Member

    The car is owned by Jim Lindsay of Shedd, OR
     
  27. touring20
    Joined: Nov 27, 2007
    Posts: 231

    touring20
    Member

    Love those early dodges!
     

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