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Featured Hot Rods T Bucket Interiors

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by tfeverfred, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. wsdad
    Joined: Dec 31, 2005
    Posts: 1,174

    wsdad
    Member

    Thanks for the detailed information. I'll be building some in the future and hadn't thought about what angle to make the back. Do you think it may need to lean back a little more if your legs are floor-level?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  2. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    From what I've seen, it's not so much as whether the seat is level. It's your back that you're trying to support in a comfortable position. A seat that's tilted back could probably do the same thing. But I'm no expert. I can only go by what I've seen.

    In my daily car, with a fully electric seat, I have the bottom slightly raised in the front and the back is at a nice angle. If I can recreate that position in my T Bucket, I'd be more than happy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
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  3. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

    There have been books written on proper ergonomics!
    While designers have standards that must fit a wide range of people, a custom built rod only has to fit you and maybe a few others.
    A quick search found this video, along with all the others in the sidebar.

    this one is good too.

    Obviously a bucket is limited in size, so it requires compromise. Your height (legs and torso) will make some more comfortable than others.

    One thing you can try is go to a new car store and try out something with a multi-adjustable seating.
    Get it so it's really comfortable like the first video, then measure the various distances.
    Try to find something that has a low seat height, since we are trying not to sit 'on' a bucket, but 'in' it.
    Here's a diagram that's got a TON of measurements but is too big for the forum. This is what designers use.
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-wJOVXln2isw/TgcyNJhNHEI/AAAAAAAAAAw/Vy7XsJXJXZY/s1600/Picture4.jpg
    I found this and others by searching for "Car Seat Ergonomics Diagram" in images.
    Note that even gas pedal, brake pedal, wheel clearance, sight lines and other measurements are defined.
     
  4. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    Great stuff, Rod!
     
  5. steel rebel
    Joined: Jun 14, 2006
    Posts: 3,555

    steel rebel
    Member

    FUCK!
     
  6. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

    Now you just have to stuff ten pounds of you into the five pound box...
    Maybe when you go to the dealer, move the seat back to within the 49" total length so the angles work for you.
    With the narrow cowl, floor pivot brake pedal, and the trans hump, it won't be perfect, but you can get "best fit".
    [​IMG]
    ... and I mentioned before about hanging out at the local upholstery shop?
    dumpster dive around back for some foam to sit on and try out that new body!
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2017
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  7. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    Rod, you posted the standard body dimensions. This is the CCR stretched body specs:

    ccr_stretched.jpg

    It's also 48" wide at the rear and 28 1/2" wide at the cowl. Plenty of room.;) If you're not going to pay attention, you won't get any cookies.:D
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2017
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  8. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

    Yeah, but this thread is for everyone! :D
     
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  9. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    Well. in all fairness, it read like you were referring to me., using the CCR pic. You get cookies, now.:D
     
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  10. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    o_O
     
  11. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Rand Man
    Joined: Aug 23, 2004
    Posts: 3,248

    Rand Man
    Member

    I’m a big fan of Model T Fords. I have a ‘27 RPU project, so I’m subscribed here.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  13. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    Cool! There are a LOT of great interiors and ideas here.
     
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  14. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    I was sitting in my car at the laundry mat today and thought about the seating position in my Taurus. Basically what I found was that other than the electric powered options and mount, my vision for a seat follows the Taurus and a lot of what's been posted. The Taurus bucket seat was 18" from front seating edge to the back. Inside seat back was 23" tall, without the head rest. The inside seat width was 22", but only 18" of that was actually used. The base was 7 1/2" tall in the front, which would be too tall for my T and the base inside rear was 5" tall, also too tall.

    So, whether I choose to make a bench or buy the low back Empi buckets, I should be good to go with a lot of whats been posted in this thread. I'm set on incorporating the cross frame work that supports the door frame assembly and I'm also seriously considering making my own bench. Which, cost wise, would be close to purchasing 2 new buckets. The DIY factor being kind of cool. So, I'm now looking back at the bench seats that have been posted and looking at how the back panels were done and attached. I'm not sure if the back piece should be separate or if the back piece should be built from the body of the car itself.

    Built off the back of the body would save a few inches, but a back built separately would be easier for me to do. Another thing I considered was steering column length and angle, but that will have to wait until the seats are done and installed.
     
  15. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    Dennis, is the seat back permanently installed or can it be removed somehow?
     
  16. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

    Fred, since you are leaning toward a DIY bench, consider your comfort fit first, then consider all the other stuff you want to jam in with you.
    Fuse block under the seat?
    Anti-theft cutoff {fuel or spark}?
    Detail supplies?
    Fire extinguisher/first aid kit?
    minimal tool kit?
    Can of fix-a-flat?
    Jumper cables?
    Duct tape, flashlight, circuit tester and safety wire?
    Extra jacket/hat/jeans? A scarf for the cutie that just has to have a ride?
    Thinking of a tonneau cover or a bikini cover for the black interior so it doesn't cook on a sunny day?
    Phone holder so you don't have to dig in your pocket while seated?
    Jewelled billet cup holder?
    A spot behind the seat to tuck [lock?] the removable steering wheel so you aren't carrying it around?

    Giving up an inch or 2 in the right spot or for example building a hollow armrest to hold stuff AND support yourself comfortably should be thought out and planned before the build.
    That '29 I posted earlier had a neat little leather "glove box". The Curbspeed Coupe here has a parcel shelf under the dash. Heck, the American Graffiti Coupe had a pocket on the door. You could tuck one in the area below your knee where your leg won't hit the side.

    Have a box of the stuff you would like to bring along and after you have set up the seat bottom and thrown a few pillows against the back, see how the rest can be tucked in too. Set up your 'office' so you can enjoy it!
     
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  17. steel rebel
    Joined: Jun 14, 2006
    Posts: 3,555

    steel rebel
    Member

    Bomber seats

    Comfortable on a drive from Bay Area Ca. to Bonn. and then to Vegas.

    Just checking in.

    Don't make your own seats Fred. The time you spend can be put toward some overtime to buy some nice buckets.

    But then it is your choice. Don't let an old guys experience sway you. Forget the fuckin math just lay them back a little. Simple.

    Oh yeah don't put the fuse block under the seat. Too much back and forth wiring. Just put a small one under the dash. Simple.

    Rebel

    DSCN0006.jpg DSCN0006.jpg
     
  18. denis4x4
    Joined: Apr 23, 2005
    Posts: 2,679

    denis4x4
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Colorado

    Yes' it can be removed. The lumbar pad was the real key to making this a comfortable driving car. Here's a shot of the underside of the seat bottom. IMG_0857.JPG
     
  19. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    Rod, that's a major plus for a bench seat. My last T Bucket bench seat had a whole lot of tools, fuse box and junk. If I don't go with a bench, I think a couple pouches behind a pair of bucket seats will do the job. I'm still trying to figure out how to make and mount the back for a bench.
     
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  20. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    Thanks!
     
  21. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 14,963

    tfeverfred
    Member

    I've been doing the math, between a bench and buying a pair of seats and I'd actually spend a little more money by making a bench. The advantages of having a bench seat is the storage area underneath and the DIY ego boost. But ONLY if it comes out nice. And I won't accept ugly seats this time around.

    As for the storage with bucket seats, an idea I think I mentioned earlier, was to mount the two bucket seats on a removable flat base or a base that flips forward. The bucket seats only weigh about 15 lbs. each, so the pair (including the wood), would be about 35 lbs. Plus, the bucket seats would look VERY nice. It could take me a few tries to get a DIY bench to look nice, but I could make it any way I choose.

    Speaking of the fuse box, it's a sure bet it'll be under the seats. Even with the dash being a few inches bigger, it would still be a PITA to get under there. I remember how my back felt, trying to wire the gauges in my old T and it sucked.

    I really didn't think I'd have so many options, when it came to seating. But it keeps my mind occupied and motivated.;)
     
  22. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

    While I like the simple look of the gauges directly mounted in the flat dash of a bucket, I'd really look for (or make) a removable panel. Wire all the gauges and put in a single multi-connector, along with enough 'slack' so that the entire thing could be unfastened and pulled out enough for basic troubleshooting.
    [​IMG]
    It also allows creativity and a chance to carry a theme or tie the whole car together.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017 at 8:49 PM
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  23. steel rebel
    Joined: Jun 14, 2006
    Posts: 3,555

    steel rebel
    Member

    Fred the wiring under the dash is a lot easier with a door.
     
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  24. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

    Let's say you wanted more than the "5 Minute Fabrication Flat Dash Panel" look.
    Measure the distance from your eyes the the dash. and where is directly ahead of them on the dash.
    Lets' say it's 48".
    Layout the gauges so they are to your liking and visible through the wheel.
    Take a flat chunk of 1/8 ply or Luan, and cut it to the size and shape of the dash.
    Lay out the gauges but use small wedge cuts of ABS pipe so each gauge is directly angled toward your eyes. The one straight ahead would be flat, the one at the far right would be angled the most.
    Example:
    [​IMG]
    This can be finished with bondo and paint so it matches the rest of the dash yet is still removable.

    Or since this is the HAMB, grab a vintage chevy dash to fit bucket and interface with the engine.
    Say the 1964 Chevy Impala cluster. Nice and thin.
    [​IMG]
    They are fairly cheap and there are modern replacements, if you gotta go that way.
    It's got some curve, so it will need to be molded into the dash.
    [​IMG]
    EXAMPLE of a 1963 listed here but sold. Good pics to show curve
    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum...scayne-instrument-panel-gage-cluster.1036488/
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017 at 9:40 PM
  25. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

    Did you have issues with glare or reflections on your last bucket?
    Would tunneling the gauges or adding a ledge over them help?
    [​IMG]
     
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  26. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 1,965

    RodStRace
    Member

  27. DaPeach
    Joined: Apr 22, 2009
    Posts: 196

    DaPeach
    Member
    from NE OH

    Fred, I talked to the trimmer yesterday, said he used luan on the side panels with ABS on the rearward curved area. He said he attached them to the sides w/ plastic push pins. I did grab more pics but they suck, should've tucked the ugly belts under for the pics. I'll be picking it up tonight, was done a couple days ago but the weather hasn't cooperated.
    int2.jpg

    in1.jpg in2.jpg


    in5.jpg in6.jpg
     
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  28. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 7,675

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    One thing I'm happy about with my 26 RPU build is that by adding 4" behind the doors when I built the body is that I get some leg room and that I could get my steering column at a reasonable angle through the lower part of the cowl and get a decent steering wheel angle like a more normal car.

    Looking at that picture above, I don't think I could enjoy driving like that at all with an almost horizontally flat steering wheel :eek:

    Like driving an old bus :D
     
  29. nrgwizard
    Joined: Aug 18, 2006
    Posts: 822

    nrgwizard
    Member
    from Minn. uSA

    Hey, Peach;
    Any shots of the interior in progress? Backside of the side panels, etc?
    TIA.
    Marcus...
     
  30. DaPeach
    Joined: Apr 22, 2009
    Posts: 196

    DaPeach
    Member
    from NE OH

    It was originally built in the late 60's from the CC plans. it's definitely got the turning radius of a greyhound bus...I'm not too quick to pull out into traffic, but it does spin itself straight pretty quickly without much help on my part. I'm only 5' tall, so leg room isn't much issue, my knees are still up & the shifter lands right under my right leg. I think he may have given me another inch or so with the back a bit flatter than it was.

    I don't have any other progress pics than what was posted earlier, sorry 'Wiz..
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2017 at 1:36 PM

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