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Technical Surface Rust ... how to protect it from growing under car ?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by gr8rods, Aug 18, 2020.

  1. gr8rods
    Joined: Dec 7, 2006
    Posts: 64

    gr8rods
    Member

    I have a car who looks it has bare metal under, it looks like surface rust, no holes etc

    But how do you best protect it?
    How do you guys do ?
    I could buy some cans of under coating (like some tar oil)
    but would that not lock it in and encapsulate it and rust grows wild beneath it ?

    I was thinking to spay it with WD40 so it can still breath but then maybe dust builds up and you have a pancake layer ?

    Please advice
    What is my best option ?
    IMG_3106.JPG
    See picture ......
    rocket pans look solid and have the went open like it should be ....
    frame has the same problem ie bare metal no paint on it .....
     
  2. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,645

    gimpyshotrods
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  3. fordor41
    Joined: Jul 2, 2008
    Posts: 921

    fordor41
    Member

    I clean rust off as best as I can, prime with Rustoleum rusty metal primer and coat with Rustoleum. will last for yrs and it's cheap to touch up if needed. I did that on my '41 in 1995 and sold it in 2017 after we put almost 150,000 miles on it and the paint was still there.
     
  4. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    Is that all original? Never been worked on? I get that impression, from the look of the dirt, slight rust, and globs of seam sealer.

    I would just make sure to park the car inside most of the time, and let it be. You live in a decent area, it's not like you're in Seattle or something.

    btw that's what the underside of cars that have lived in AZ all their life look like, after 50-70 years. No need to do anything to it.
     
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  5. mr.chevrolet
    Joined: Jul 19, 2006
    Posts: 6,893

    mr.chevrolet
    Member

    spray it with OSPHO and forget about it for a couple years, then do it again.
     
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  6. gr8rods
    Joined: Dec 7, 2006
    Posts: 64

    gr8rods
    Member

    It is a New Mexico car I guess same climate as AZ. Ie dry and sunny most of the time. It’s going to CA also known for rust free cars.

    I know a throughout restoration is ideal but this is more a daily driver and not intended to be a trailered show car. I just doesn’t look right to me to see surface rust exposure.

    I just POR-15 before sealing trunk floor and other parts inside the car and that stuff is tuff and more like a epoxy paint. But I never sprayed it on I only brushed and I don’t think it comes in spray cans. And make sure it does not come on your fingers. It is almost impossible to remove and sits there for weeks and I have never been successful with resealing a can after I open it. It seals the lid for good and the inside harden as well so make sure not to buy more than needed for one job.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  7. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 27,516

    Mr48chev
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    I'd think that cleaning it good with a wire brush an using the right Rustoleum, Por 15 or other rust converter product would work pretty well.
    I wouldn't undercoat it over that though as it will eat away behind the undercoating.
     
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  8. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    No way would I put something like por15 on that!

    Sent from my Trimline
     
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  9. 67drake
    Joined: Aug 8, 2008
    Posts: 94

    67drake
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Avoca WI

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  10. Rusty Heaps
    Joined: May 19, 2011
    Posts: 612

    Rusty Heaps
    Member

    I do like fordor41 says. It is inexpensive and works well with the proper prep. It’s needed here in this temperate rain forest climate in East Tennessee. In your case, I think I would drive it as is and park it in a garage. As to the problem with POR15, after you put the lid on securely, notice the word “ securely “, invert the can and store it upside down. You should be able to remove the lid easily and the material will be as fresh as it was when sealed. I’m a painter by trade.
     
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  11. As has been said already here, spray it with a light coat of Ospho and be done with it. It will nuetralize the rust without a thick coat of crap to trap rust later. Its cheap, simple and effective what more could you need.
     
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  12. They sell similar products in a spray can at the hardware store as well. Screenshot_20200819-140435_Google.jpeg
     
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  13. Hemi Joel
    Joined: May 4, 2007
    Posts: 846

    Hemi Joel
    Member
    from Minnesota


    I second Gibbs lubricant
     
  14. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 3,926

    indyjps
    Member

    Really depends on how much work you want to do. 1 shot and done, or spend some time on it and detail the unserside of the car.

    If you wanna start neutralizing the rust, a VERY mild acid solution in multiple treatments. Vinegar sprayed on with garden sprayer, itll take a lot of coats, wash well with soap and water and monitor process.
    OSPHO, vinegar, oxalic acid, even coca-cola would work for the mild acid.

    For long term protection, depends. Paint it, spray on a chassis wax, spray on an oil coat that will get all gooed up with dirt.

    Ive been using danish oil, its a furniture oil that dries out, very similar to linseed oil, but its a blend of oils with solvent. I shoot it inside doors, rockers, cavities and seams of car for winter protection. Yes - its a dripping F'n mess until it dries, but it works.
     
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  15. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 3,926

    indyjps
    Member

    I have NO love for por 15. If you do use it, dont even take the lid off, drill 2 holes in the lid, pour and vent and put screws in after each pour.

    I just used some on my daily driver late model truck, behind the tailight housing getting rust inside the bed. Wire wheeled, wiped with acetone let it dry, applied por15, 2 coats in May. I replaced a bulb last week, August, and the Por 15 had already failed, rust coming thru it. Ive had it peel off in sheets at times too.
    GARBAGE. Failure in 4 months in summer time weather in a protected cavity. Whats it gonna do in winter and salt.
     
  16. gr8rods
    Joined: Dec 7, 2006
    Posts: 64

    gr8rods
    Member

    Hi again .... I never heard of Fluid Film before
    So I did a search for it and found a youtube video test about under coating for cars or metal
    Flex Seal I would think would be worst ever but in came in as 2nd place
    I wish they had tested OSPHO as well but they did not .....
    Motor oil was WORST even made the rust more



    Fluid Film test result.JPG
    upload_2020-8-19_16-54-52.png
     
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  17. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    What do you expect to be trying to corrode the car, now that you're taking care of it?
     
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  18. gr8rods
    Joined: Dec 7, 2006
    Posts: 64

    gr8rods
    Member

    I opting between
    Fluid Film (Sold in Spray cans) $6.50 Summit Racing or 9.99 Lowes
    and
    OSPHO (brush on alt. I have to bring out the air spray gun) $23 a bottle
     
  19. Last one I used wasnt Ospho brand but some other brand of "Rust Converter" in a rattle can from Harbor Freight. Worked well, not that expensive either.
     
  20. Pats55
    Joined: Apr 29, 2013
    Posts: 412

    Pats55
    Member
    from NJ


    This particular test was done with a very mild brine solution. Rustolem was the first to fail followed by calcium sulfonate which is undercoating like fluid film and then the epoxy primer three coats. All panels had three coats.

    A salt spray test using road salt which just completed and the first three items were not even tested.

    Next video will be the advantages of metal prep with rustoleum rusty metal primer, self etching primer, Epoxy primer and maybe I'll throw in the Mastercoat primer for the hell of it. I'll post these videos when the testing is complete. If any of you would like me to test any coating PM me and I'll be happy to throw them in the tank.
     
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  21. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member


    What I'm asking is why you think you need to do anything to the car? Why do you think it's going to start rusting more?

    If you stay where you are, keep it reasonably protected from weather, don't drive on the Salt Flats, don't drive it on the beach, and don't park it in a rain forest or something, it will stay like it is for a very long time. Especially if you can keep it in a garage most of the time. You don't need to put anything on it. It'll be fine.
     
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  22. ^^^^^^^^^ I agree with above.. If you live inland from the coast DONT PHUCK WITH IT
     
  23. gr8rods
    Joined: Dec 7, 2006
    Posts: 64

    gr8rods
    Member

    rust2.jpeg rust.jpeg

    Here is example of cars (not mine) that has no rust protection or paint under and the frame and floor is covered with surface rust but no holes (yet) .... it needs a major sandblast and prep and paint but what do you do in the mean time while still driving it .... just want to stop and preserve it as good as possible cause this looks bad to me.
    Cars should be driven and used but when they end up sitting for a long period of time they start to look like this ie an unrestored or untouch old car that is put back on the road again ....
     
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  24. gr8rods
    Joined: Dec 7, 2006
    Posts: 64

    gr8rods
    Member

    For the record : Flex Seal I would avoid is possible, I have used it on other projects before and as someone pointed out it does never dry and becomes sticky and tacky forever ... so avoid if possible on a car ... my2cents
     
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  25. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,413

    Fortunateson
    Member

    I'm betting on Master Series.
    Now as far as doing anything for that particular rust situation you had better think long and hard before you decide to do anything at all. You probably don't realize it but if you mess with that rust you'll be destroying the priceless "patina" and your car will be worthless. What you really want is for that rust to develop and evolve into full on rotten floors that Fred Flintstone would be envious of! The value of your car will climb into the stratosphere and you'll have "flow-through ventilation" to boot!
     
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  26. mbat
    Joined: Oct 18, 2007
    Posts: 7

    mbat
    Member
    from Ohio

    Fluid film is lanolin and petroleum jelly. Not calcium sulfonate. Fluid film has worked very well for me in the road salt up here in the great lakes area. Heck I live 30 minutes from one of the world's largest salt mines.

    I have seen FF cause elastomeric materials to swell and deform. This is keeping me from putting it on my Aluminum bodied F150.

    FF us used extensively in maritime applications and by the US Navy. The best part about FF is there is practically zero prep work. Just spray it on directly over the rust. It will penetrate into the rusty surface and seal it up.

    I would not put FF on any surface you intend to paint. It soaks in and is almost like a thin grease.

    Sent from my E6910 using Tapatalk
     
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  27. simplyconnected
    Joined: Jun 5, 2009
    Posts: 64

    simplyconnected
    Member

    FYI... OSPHO is phosphoric acid. Yep, the same stuff used to give Coca-Cola that 'tang'. Other products also contain phosphoric acid like, CLR, etc. Read the labels!
     
  28. Baumi
    Joined: Jan 28, 2003
    Posts: 2,530

    Baumi
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    My 2 cents: I usually spray fluid film inside the doors, rockers, underfloor braces, and every cavity that may collect humidity, but then we are getting quite some rain here and even some salt on the roads. If I were living in a desert like area like you are, I think I´d just put it on a lift, wash it as good as possible with a good pressure washer and let it dry out for a few days. After that you could just spray on some Owatrol Oil, I have done it several times to keep unrestored vehicles from rusting . You can also paint over it should the need arise.
    https://owatrol-international.com/en/housing/9180-owatrol-ol-de.html
     
  29. Pats55
    Joined: Apr 29, 2013
    Posts: 412

    Pats55
    Member
    from NJ

    Fluid film is calcium sulfonate It is on the MSD sheet Along with petroleum lubricants
     
  30. enjenjo
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 2,515

    enjenjo
    Member
    from swanton oh

    If it peels off in sheets it wasn't applied properly. If all the rust is removed it won't stick. And if it's oily it won't stick. If there is just a slight amount of rust, just hand wire brush the loose rust, blow it off with clean air, and apply the POR15.

    The basic concept of POR15 and similar products is it soaks into the tight rust, robbing it of moisture, and sealing it in place. Moisture is what makes it cure. It is basically Super glue with a pigment added. Done properly it will last a long time.

    There is more to it than what I have explained but that depends on the situation. What you want is clean tight rust, and not surgically cleaned metal.
     
    2OLD2FAST likes this.

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