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stupid question-upside down brakes ?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 6-71, Mar 24, 2006.

  1. 6-71
    Joined: Sep 15, 2005
    Posts: 542

    6-71
    Member

    I was doing a 4 wheel alignment on a 32 ford truck today at work,I was adjusting the rear 4 bar and thought something didnt look right on the rear end. I finally realised that the backing plates were upside down!! I mean the wheel cylinders were on the bottom and the e-brake cables on top! It is a currie 9 inch,and the owner said he bought the rear end fully assembled from currie. Is this something new that I havent heard about or could it be a major mistake? I am sure they could be switched from side to side and turned over if necessary.
     
  2. Flatman
    Joined: Dec 20, 2005
    Posts: 1,975

    Flatman
    Member

    No chance the rear end was installed upside down? I have to think the shoes wouldn't self energize very well.

    Flatman
     
  3. HemiRambler
    Joined: Aug 26, 2005
    Posts: 4,208

    HemiRambler
    Member

    I know nothing about Currie, but if they're like any other company then they are subject to their employees which may or may not ALL be up to par.

    That said - I think I too would definitely make sure the whole darn shebang isn't upside down - THAT would make me nervous as the pinion wouldn't be oiled properly.

    A similar post came up the other day - the majority belief is that you can put the wheel cylinders in any orientation as you want despite Detroit's efforts to keep the bleeders at the TOP of the "wells". I personally think bleeding will be difficult to get 100% of the air out - but I understand not everyone is worried about that.

    So with that said - IF you get the air blead out - I personally don't see any real problem with running the drum brakes upside down as the SERVO EFFECT is based on rotation NOT orientation. In addition to that - the "modern" rear end (9" you mention) have DUAL SERVO action and work equally well in either direction so you get full Servo Effect regardless of direction on the "modern stuff". IMHO
     
  4. texoutsider
    Joined: Jul 6, 2005
    Posts: 826

    texoutsider
    Member
    from Frisco, Tx

    That's gonna be a bitch to bleed....thinking they are upside down...maybe the ends are on wrong...

    Seen em come thru here every way but right...still working some...but..tried and true is best....who knows...

    I'll put em like they were way back when..they worked then...should still do it.

    M.
     

  5. Dugg
    Joined: Feb 11, 2006
    Posts: 160

    Dugg
    Member

    If the complete rear end were installed upside down, wouldn't the car have one speed forward and several in reverse?
     
  6. HemiRambler
    Joined: Aug 26, 2005
    Posts: 4,208

    HemiRambler
    Member

    Ahhh eerrhhh - gulp!! Yah you're right!!! Unless of course they installed the transmission BACKWARDS too!!!:D Or maybe they had a Reverse Rotation Engine!!

    Reminds me of the time my buddy made some CUSTOM linkage for his Muncie in his '34. Things were TIGHT and somehow flipping a shifter arm upside side solved a clearance problem - I think it was 3-4. So when he goes to drive it - yep - you guessed it it shifted 1 - 2 - 4 -3 Sure got his attention when he shifted into what he thought was 4th!!!

     
  7. muffman58
    Joined: Oct 24, 2003
    Posts: 999

    muffman58
    Member

    WHAT? How would that make a difference? The rear end has no trans in it!
     
  8. Slag Kustom
    Joined: May 10, 2004
    Posts: 4,312

    Slag Kustom
    Member


    with the ring gear on the other side the rotation is changed to the other direction.
     
  9. muffman58
    Joined: Oct 24, 2003
    Posts: 999

    muffman58
    Member

    Oh Hell! I knew that! Just had a brain fart! I use to flip ring gears in vws to run mid-engine buggys.
     
  10. Nimrod
    Joined: Dec 13, 2003
    Posts: 856

    Nimrod
    Member

    As long as the wheel cylinders where right side up there would be no problem bleeding it.
     
  11. chrisntx
    Joined: Jan 20, 2006
    Posts: 1,798

    chrisntx
    Member
    from Texas .

    Having the wheel cylinders at the bottom is less desirable. It would be a lot easier to snag something and damage a brake line. I dragged a model T rear axle across my back yard while ago and got the chain tangled in the mechanical linkage of my Model A
     
  12. i had a few dealings with currie and they are a pain in the ass. it seems to me if you don't buy thier top dollar rear complete they don't care. i took 2 9" rear ends in (years apart) to have them shortened and had problems with the end result. they wanted both complete (with 3rd member and backing plates), both they tried to return them to me with no backing plates, no T bolts, no nuts for the 3rd member, 1 they couldn't find the 3rd member, didn't do other work on the workorder (replace bearings) and tried to sell me a new shaft because one shaft was bent even though it came out of a running/ driving car. when i told them about THEM wanting the rear complete they bitched and gave me new T bolts.....on top of it all they both where about 2 weeks later then the est.
     

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