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History Streamliner Dragsters

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by loudbang, Oct 17, 2017.

  1. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 12,698

    loudbang
    Member

    Noticed that there are photos of streamliners spread in a bunch of threads because there was no thread just for Streamliners.

    So I found a bunch and made this the place to put them. In their heyday they were very popular and there were a bunch of different ones.

    So if you have any feel free to posted them here.

    This batch found here:http://www.hotrod.com/articles/drag-racings-twilight-zone-streamline-dragsters

    Mickey Thompson Panorama City Special: 1955

    Appearing at the first NHRA Nationals in 1955 at Great Bend, Kansas, Mickey Thompson’s dragster is thought to be the archetype for the slingshot chassis configuration. At a 97-inch wheelbase, it featured a complete body with enclosed cockpit and rear tires. In this image, the front bodywork is removed. At Great Bend it ran 142 mph when competition was just shy of the 150-mph mark. Later that year it went 151.26 mph, becoming the first single-engine dragster to top 150 mph.

    1.JPG


    Tognotti Goldfinger/Bushwacker: 1964

    A NorCal effort to promote Tognotti’s Speed Shop in Sacramento, the 156-inch chassis was built by Pete Ogden with an aluminum body by Arnie Roberts. Christened originally as “Goldfinger,” it made its first appearance at the 1964 March Meet. With a Hemi built by Ron Welty and shoed by Lyle Kelly, low-8s at 196-plus mph were its early numbers. In 1965 Don Honstein repainted the body, then known as the “Bushwacker.” It ran at three March Meets and local tracks campaigned by Welty before being sold.

    2.JPG



    Mickey Thompson, Fritz Voigt Dragster: 1958

    Originally intended for the quarter-mile, an impromptu stop at Bonneville during Speed Week resulted in Thompson and Voigt temporarily abandoning their drag-racing intentions to instead capitalize on the dragster’s off-the-trailer first run of 242 mph on the salt. Later that week Thompson hit a one-way best of 294.117, breaking a connecting rod during his backup attempt. The front 392 Hemi was placed backward powering the front axle, while the rear 392 was in a traditional configuration, powering the rear axle. Lessons learned on this car resulted in the four-engine “Challenger I” Bonneville car. Thompson did extensive tests with this dragster at Lions Drag Strip, which he built and operated. Hitting 149.50 mph in the high-9s sans body, the twin was slower than contemporary slingshots hitting mid-9s.


    3.JPG


    T.V. Tommy Ivo Videoliner: 1965

    Another beautiful Steve Swaja design, Frank Huzar built the chassis and Bob Sorrell pounded out the aluminum body. This was the car Ivo planned on barnstorming around the country for 1965. Testing at Fremont, Ivo said the Videoliner wanted to swap ends in the lights, calling it a “reverse teardrop.” Besides handling woes, exhaust and burnt rubber channeled into the cockpit caused vision and breathing problems. Initially Ivo cut holes in the body above the slicks and vented the exhaust into the wheelwells, but pressure blew holes in the body panels. Yikes! Some of the body’s rear was sawed off, scalloping the fenders in an attempt to lessen the spooky handling. A best of 7.82 e.t. at 199 mph was achieved, but Ivo never sorted out the car’s evil handing, pulling the engine to use for the more conventional “Red Wing” dragster he soon built to replace the doomed ’liner.

    4.JPG


    El Tigre/Shadoff Special: 1966

    A repurposed Bonneville streamliner owned by Mal Hooper with a chassis by Carl Fleishmann and fiberglass body designed by Dean Batchelor, “El Tigre” was originally built in 1953 and raced as the “Shadoff Special,” setting 15 FIA International records between 1953 and 1960 with a best speed of 273.68 in 1960. By 1966 it was reconfigured as a mid-engine dragster by Ted Worobieff with Don Rackemann at the wheel.

    5.JPG

    More to come can't sit long enough to get them done in one night :(
     
  2. Deuces
    Joined: Nov 3, 2009
    Posts: 14,732

    Deuces
    Member
    from Michigan

    Good job!!!!!
    Keep them coming!... :)
     
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  3. Thanks,great read and history.
     
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  4. Here's a shot of Emory Cook in Jocko Johnson's streamliner. This shot is at Riverside the day this car rocked the drag race world with an unreal pass of 8.35 seconds. This was when the best in the business were just starting to run 8.50's. It was also, accidentally, the first ever slipper clutch. On the 8.35 pass, the clutch disc began loosing it's facing, and started slipping. The tires just hooked and the no smoke pass became the quickest ever in the summer of '59. For a time this was the world's quickest dragster.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. A couple shots I took of Mickey's twin at Old San Gabe, before the body was built. This was the first test, just before Mickey took over LIONS. Fritz made a couple of un impressive passes with the car that day, but at least he found out that his concept worked mechanically.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. [​IMG]

    The front engine was from Mickey's full bodied slingshot dragster. The rear engine was Fritz's.
     
  7. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 2,450

    jnaki

    Hey Dean,

    We were some of the only Long Beach locals that never saw the Jocko's stream liner race at the dragstrips. But, we did get to see it in person at his shop in North Long Beach. His shop also did some porting and polishing on our 40 Willy's SBC heads. In Long Beach, if you wanted to go faster, porting and polishing was the way to go. Jocko’s place was the place to get it done.

    In person, that streamliner was impressive to say the least. We liked fairly streamlined race cars, Sidewinder, Speed Sport, Etc. But, we never saw that Jocko’s streamliner race.

    Junji
     
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  8. firingorder1
    Joined: Dec 15, 2006
    Posts: 2,117

    firingorder1
    Member

    The "Pulsator" at Pomona 1965. Twin injected Chevies. Ran 202 first time out.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Junji,
    Jocko was the ONLY place for head work in the early 60's. He did the heads on my RPU, and our Bonneville engines. Don Nicholson recommended Jocko, and that was good enough for us! I saw the 'liner in Jocko's shop with the engine out. He was getting ready to switch to the Allison engine. He was working with Jim Lytle (Big Al) on the drive train.
     
  10. dreracecar
    Joined: Aug 27, 2009
    Posts: 2,512

    dreracecar
    Member
    from so-cal

    Oldsmobile heads out of Jockos shop
    100_2332.JPG 100_2331.JPG
     
  11. rd martin
    Joined: Nov 14, 2006
    Posts: 1,801

    rd martin
    Member
    from indiana

    them babies are ported!
     
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  12. rd martin
    Joined: Nov 14, 2006
    Posts: 1,801

    rd martin
    Member
    from indiana

    kool thread thanks for starting!
     
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  13. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 12,698

    loudbang
    Member

    Tine for a few more. Forgot to add the usual please keep then to a HAMB friendly era as there were more done after the HAMB years :)

    Scrima, Bacilek, Milodon Scrimaliner: 1964

    Designed by Ronnie Scrima, he built the “Scrimaliner” with George Bacilek, while Bob Sorrell made the aluminum body. Don Alderson of Milodon built the blown 392 Chrysler. The idea for the exposed engine was in case of an engine fire or blower explosion the shrapnel wouldn’t be trapped inside of the metalflake red body, possibly injuring the driver. Built stout for running rougher eastern tracks, the car weighted 1,600 pounds, making it one of the heavier dragsters at that time. It debuted at Lions in August 1964 with Roy “Goober” Tuller driving. With a best of 8.14 e.t. at 202 mph, Scrima attributed its good numbers compared to other ’liners to the long tail and stiffer frame. Later Pat Foster got some seat time.

    6.JPG


    Everybody's favorite JOCKO after Big Daddy got his hands on it.

    Jocko Streamliner: 1958
    Jocko Johnson’s rear-engine dragster debuted in July 1958 to mixed results. Then in May 1959 the Chrysler Hemi-powered streamliner started setting records, though this could also be attributed to his courage to tip the nitro can more—first at 60 percent, then 75 percent—running 8.80 e.t.’s when the fastest fuelers were in the mid-8s. Downforce shattered the fiberglass body soon after hitting 175 mph. Reproducing the body in aluminum (and with Allison V12 power this time), it was never faster than 175 mph, which Jocko attributed to the 3,200-pound weight.


    7.JPG


    Breedlove Spirit II: 1964

    Built by Craig Breedlove and Nye Frank, with aluminum bodywork by Indycar builder Quin Epperly, “Spirit II” debuted at the 1964 HOT ROD Magazine Championships. This was a busy time for Breedlove to be putting efforts into a dragster when he was also embarking on a land-speed-record car. Notable for its covered front wheel “pants,” the theory espoused that besides streamlining for an additional 10 mph by cutting drag generated behind conventional open front wheels, this would aid in steering at high speeds. Why you would need that in straight-line racing escapes us now. The beautifully built ’liner ran 8.50 at 185 mph. Landing on the show circuit for a time, it now resides at the Don Garlits Museum of Drag Racing in Ocala, Florida.


    8.JPG


    Tony Nancy Gas Dragster: 1963


    Tony Nancy’s AA/Gas “Wedge I” and similar “Wedge II” were penned by Steve Swaja, with Wayne Ewing and Emil Deidt pounding out the aluminum body over the RCS chassis. Powered by a wedge-head, 428ci Plymouth, Wedge I was said to “twitch” during runs. It flipped in the eyes in July 1964 at Sandusky, Ohio, doing an endo at more than 200 mph. Nancy was unhurt and concluded along with Swaja that pressure created by the slicks trapped air, lifting the rear of the dragster and flipping it. For Wedge II, elongated slots were added to the body above the slicks to aid air escaping—and the wheelbase was lengthened. Power came first from another stroked Plymouth wedge, then a blown Chrysler Hemi, and finally a blown Olds. At Monza in Italy Nancy set a record of 195 mph in 400-meter acceleration runs. He brought it back to the U.S., stored it, and built a conventional Top Fuel
    slingshot. Years later, he restored Wedge II.


    9.JPG


    Logghe-Steffey-Rupp/Logghe-Marsh-Rupp Dragster: 1964

    The Logghe brothers’ unblown Chevy ’liner made its maiden run at the NHRA Nationals in September 1964. Though it ran a respectable 8.10 e.t., driver Maynard Rupp fought spooky handling through the quarter-mile from the 1,000-pound, 136-inch wheelbase slingshot. Replacing the fuel Chevy with a Chrysler Hemi, times decreased to 7.93 at 191 mph, but handling remained scary. Determining low-pressure areas existed alongside of the fiberglass body, this explained the dragster’s habit of sudden lane changes without warning.


    10.JPG
     
  14. RMR&C
    Joined: Dec 26, 2009
    Posts: 2,642

    RMR&C
    Member
    from NW Montana

    Interesting topic, thanks for the history lesson!
     
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  15. dreracecar
    Joined: Aug 27, 2009
    Posts: 2,512

    dreracecar
    Member
    from so-cal

    After early issues, the Scrima Liner's body was removed and thrown into a dumpster. As with all attempts at streamlining, weight was always the problem, and lightness won that argument
     
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  16. nrgwizard
    Joined: Aug 18, 2006
    Posts: 940

    nrgwizard
    Member
    from Minn. uSA

    Jockos' Liner & Garlits' Liner are two different dragsters. Both are in Garlits' museum.
    Marcus...
     
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  17. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 12,698

    loudbang
    Member

    And they still keep coming. :)


    George Schreiber’s Yellow Fang: 1966


    Schreiber had Jim Davis build a 153-inch dragster chassis in 1963, but Schreiber was down on bucks. At nights he worked at Ed “Big Daddy” Roth’s, helping with fabrication that included Roth’s show cars. Over the years Roth workers threw loose change on the roof of a storage room, and it eventually collapsed from the weight. Knowing he needed money, Roth gave Schreiber all of the change and directed him to hit up Mickey Thompson for parts in exchange for the money he owed Roth for printing Thompson promotional T-shirts.

    This must have been enough because Schreiber contacted designer Steve Swaja, who came up with the basic design. Schreiber and Roth then tweaked it in a clay model they gave to Tom Hanna, who built the body—estimated to have cost $5,000. Roth painted it Diamond T Truck Yellow, christening it “Yellow Fang.” Bill Demerest built the 0.030-over 392 Chrysler, but soon Schreiber took over wrenching chores. Problems with the enclosed canopy in Connie Swingle’s shakedown runs resulted in removing the windshield, after which Schreiber piloted the Fang. Seeing an overseas campaign in Australia and a U.S. barnstorming tour in 1967 and 1968.

    11.JPG


    Pulsator Twin Engine Dragster: 1965

    Built by Nye Frank, who had a hand in a number of streamline dragster and race-car builds, “Pulsator” was a copy of his Freight Train Top Gas dragster, but with a fiberglass body. Both were driven by Bob Muravez, aka Floyd Lippencott Jr. Two 900hp, 327ci Chevy engines stroked to 364 ci on nitro powered Pulsator, tied by a sprocket at the back of the front engine and another at the front of the rear, wrapped with a chain. Inexplicable problems arose.

    Swapping engines front to back and to the front again, the rear engine would always exhibit extremely poor performance. On the dyno, each engine ran 900 hp, but tied together, they put out a combined 950 hp. Single-engine Top Fuel dragsters were hitting 1,500 hp, so no aerodynamic advantage could overcome the mysterious 600hp deficit. Interference between the two magnetos and other theories were put forth and solutions tried, with no
    effect on the performance dilemma. Finally, Nye threw in the towel. The chassis hangs from Muravez’s garage rafters today, while the body found a second life as the “Ice Kutter” snowmobile dragster show car by George Barris.

    12.JPG


    Hank Vincent Top Banana Fueler: 1958

    Over a period of five years, the team of Santos-Vincent-Govia campaigned Frank Vincent’s “Top Banana” B/ and C/Fuel dragster to national records in both classes. Hailing from Hayward, California, the red beauty was a staple at NorCal dragstrips running an Algon-injected small-block. It was considered so beautiful that it graced the October 1958 cover of Rod & Custom magazine. In May 1960 at Baylands in Fremont, California, Vincent was running through the eyes when the dragster veered off the track, launching into a 170-mph barrel roll. Vincent was impaled by the pushbar, killing him instantly, with witnesses saying he never lifted.


    13.JPG


    Hatfiled Brothers A/F Modified Roadster: 1964

    Streamlining caught up with Modifieds, too. The Hatfiled brothers were building this 180-inch wheelbase Modified Roadster while helping on Manuel Gonzales’ “Californian” small-block dragster. Inspired by Holly Hedrich’s Speed Sport roadster, it was finished in November 1964. Unfortunately, it crashed in early 1965 at Lions, making images of it kind of rare. According to Doyle Hatfiled, the brothers decided not to rebuild.

    14 and road.JPG


    Masters Auto Supply Dragliner: 1956

    Sponsored by Masters Auto Supply, this was the first joint effort by Jim Nelson and Dode Martin, later to join forces to be known as Dragmaster—with Jim’s brother Tom building engines. The Dragmaster name originated from this C/Gas dragster. The successful Fallbrook, California, shop built hundreds of dragster chassis over the years. Built in 1956 with a Ford flathead, that engine soon gave way to a Chevy small-block the next year. The gold body and nose are fiberglass, from plaster molds made by Dode. At the 1957 NHRA Nationals, it won Best Engineered. Returning in 1958, it won C Dragster Top Eliminator. Sold to fund other Dragmaster efforts, it eventually disappeared, but Dode built a recreation in 2010.

    15.JPG
     
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  18. guffey
    Joined: Mar 23, 2008
    Posts: 996

    guffey

  19. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 2,450

    jnaki

    Hello,
    We were lucky to have been close up to Jocko's streamliner in person at his shop as stated before. But, the sad thing was we never saw that streamliner run. Of all of the streamlined race cars in this thread, so far, we saw the Hank Vincent, "Top Banana" at Bakersfield Smokers March Meet in 1960. That FED was immaculate and impressive.

    upload_2017-10-19_5-35-54.png
    Jnaki

    It was awful reading about the accident at Fremont Dragstrip, two months after I took these movies at the Bakersfield Smokers Meet in March.

     
  20. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 12,698

    loudbang
    Member

    Gary MacArthur Dragster: 1958

    No, this is not the Top Banana dragster. This is Gary MacArthur’s 1958 rail from Oakland, California. Gary was a brave soul to buckle up inside that enclosed pill bottle of a dragster. Running an Algon-injected Olds, the aluminum body was the work of the Bay Area’s Jack Hagemann. It won the Oakland Roadster Show’s “Most Beautiful Competition Car” in 1960. MacArthur ran the dragster in the Bay area, and later converted it to a 4-71 blown small-block Chevy with zoomies. According to longtime NorCal drag racer Denny Forsberg, MacArthur is still around.

    16.JPG


    Al Bergler’s More Aggravation III: 1966

    With sponsorship from Gratiot Auto in Detroit, Al Bergler’s “More Aggravation III” was the product of Al and the Logghe Bros. dragster and Funny Car factory (also in Detroit). Bergler was the tin man for the operation, forming the inner tin for Funny Cars and shaping assorted dragster bodies over the years. This was his own car, featuring a 1923 Model T body and a 484ci Hemi on gas and direct drive, running in the AA/Comp Dragster class, with a best of 7.80 e.t. at 190 mph. At the 1967 NHRA Winternationals, Bergler won both his class and also Best Appearing Car honors.


    17.JPG


    Stan Johnson’s C Gas/Modified Silver Bullet: 1964

    Johnson built this Modified in his Wisconsin garage, starting with a Lakewood chassis, opting for the then-new 273ci Dodge for power. He wanted mechanical injection, but with none available for the small block Mopar, he made his own. The handmade body is a combination of fiberglass and aluminum, and features wheel fairings covering the slicks and a canopy built into the tonneau cover. The “Silver Bullet” held the Drag News record for C/Modified at 142 mph, but Johnson would occasionally add nitro, upping the speeds to 162 mph.

    18 and road.JPG


    Mooneyham-Ferguson-Jackson-Faust Dragster: 1965

    This fiberglass body designed and built by Jocko Johnson actually ran on two completely different dragsters with the same results. Debuting at the 1965 March Meet as the Chrisman and Cannon “Hustler VI” on a Woody chassis, the team removed the body after weak passes. The next day on a checkout pass, the body-less dragster was destroyed.

    Johnson then talked the “Jungle Four” team of Gene Mooneyham, Wayne Ferguson, Jerry Jackson, and driver “Jungle Larry” Faust into giving the body a shot on their 354ci Chrysler-powered Woody chassis that just came off of a 7.53-e.t., 200-mph record run in A/FD. At Lions for test sessions Faust experienced extreme steering problems, smashing into the eyes and causing damage to the nose.

    Johnson made repairs overnight and the Jungle Four team was back at San Fernando, where the same thing happened on the first pass, causing the dragster to veer off the track. The team supposedly hired a NASA aerodynamicist, who concluded there was so much downforce on the covered front tires that steering could not overcome the pressure, rendering the car unsteerable. Its best time was 8.20 at 197.80 mph. The dragster survives today at the Garlits Museum.

    19.JPG


    Jack Williams-Ron Lowe Syndicate Scuderia Dragster: 1963

    Hailing from Vancouver, Canada, the team of Williams-Devine-McDougall took Williams’ old dragster and reconstructed it into the “Scuderia” Gas dragster. With a blue Lexan canopy matching the metalflake blue aluminum body, it ran a 404ci Chrysler Hemi with a Potvin front-drive blower and in-and-out box. With Devine and McDougall out and Ron Lowe in, the two hauled the dragster to the 1963 Winternationals in Pomona, where an early record run of 8.83 at 169.17 could not be bested after mechanical gremlins killed the dragster’s chances. Still, it won a “Best Appearing” trophy. Later at Arlington it set a Top Gas record of 162.22. Retired in 1967, Williams dusted it off and participated in 1980s West Coast nostalgia meets; he crashed at Fremont, sustaining serious injuries.

    20 and trophy.JPG
     
  21. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 12,698

    loudbang
    Member

    Last of this batch.

    Bob Ellic Dragster: 1955

    Even in drag racing’s earliest days, racers knew streamlining would help lower elapsed times. This 1955 shot of Bob Ellic’s dragster from Omaha, Nebraska, records his attempt at streamlining with a nose and bodywork, such as it was, covering the flathead Merc engine for better airflow. Weight for this dragster came in at 1,475 pounds.

    21.JPG


    Sorry no info on these last two it "got lost" in my computer somewhere.

    22.JPG

    23.JPG
     
  22. rooman
    Joined: Sep 20, 2006
    Posts: 3,073

    rooman
    Member

    "Sorry no info on these last two it "got lost" in my computer somewhere."

    [​IMG]
    Just scroll up to your own post #13

    And this one is the psychedelic paint version of the Roth/Schreiber Yelow Fang that is in your post #17
    [​IMG]

    Roo
     
  23. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 12,698

    loudbang
    Member

    Super Mustang

    STREAMLINER.JPG
     
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  24. ttwomotor
    Joined: Jul 26, 2012
    Posts: 376

    ttwomotor
    Member
    from Illinois

  25. ttwomotor
    Joined: Jul 26, 2012
    Posts: 376

    ttwomotor
    Member
    from Illinois

  26. ttwomotor
    Joined: Jul 26, 2012
    Posts: 376

    ttwomotor
    Member
    from Illinois

  27. frank spittle
    Joined: Jan 29, 2009
    Posts: 1,439

    frank spittle
    Member

    The Ron Rivera driven K&G Speed Associates front engine T/F dragster with Tom Hanna body work was one of the best looking ever and won the '68 March Meet. I will try to dig up a picture if someone doesn't beat me to it. Thanks loudbang for starting this thread.
     
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  28. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 12,698

    loudbang
    Member

    Going through my shots posted in other threads and adding them here too.

    Tony Nancy

    [​IMG]

    Frank Nye

    [​IMG]

    Jocko Johnson

    [​IMG]
     
  29. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 12,698

    loudbang
    Member

  30. catdad49
    Joined: Sep 25, 2005
    Posts: 2,017

    catdad49
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Does the AMT sponsored rear engine car count? Anyone have pics? The streamliner era in the 60's was both an exciting and disappointing time, but they sure were different. How about the Snake and Mongoose "wedge" cars?
     

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