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Technical Storing vehicle 4 extended period

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by TudorTony, Jul 29, 2019.

  1. TudorTony
    Joined: Jun 2, 2013
    Posts: 223

    TudorTony
    Member
    from NJ

    Always had good results storing cars w typical hit list 4 storing except brakes. Always seem to be issues? Any tricks, additives process to keep them viable over extended storage?
     
  2. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,258

    squirrel
    Member

    Before storing the car, replace all the rubber parts (wheel cylinder and master cylinder cups, flexible hoses), blow out the lines, but don't add new fluid. Then when it's time to get it going again, add fluid, bleed, and away you go.
     
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  3. Moriarity
    Joined: Apr 11, 2001
    Posts: 22,271

    Moriarity
    SUPER MODERATOR
    Staff Member

    I used to take care of a pretty big car collection for a guy that lived near me. He had about 40-50 cars, Mostly early corvettes but a few 5-7 chevs and a dozen or so old ford hot rods. The cars rarely got used but would get moved out of the building once per summer just to tidy up and to put a little fresh gas in each car and run them around the block a few times to warm them up. almost every time we would find leaky wheel cylinders or calipers from sitting un used. After a few years of this I started a program of every few weeks when I was dusting the cars, I would get in and pump the brake pedal a few times just to get things moving. the wheel cylinder failures stopped after that. I helped there on saturdays for about 15 years and the last 10 or so were brake failure free.... So, if you are going to store the car where it is handy to get at, pump the pedal every couple of weeks, worked for me....
     
  4. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,448

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This is really your collection, right?
     
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  5. TudorTony
    Joined: Jun 2, 2013
    Posts: 223

    TudorTony
    Member
    from NJ

    ‘07 BMW M Roadster, ’67 442, ‘35 Ford Tudor & most recent ‘40 Ford PU.
     
  6. 1ton
    Joined: Dec 3, 2010
    Posts: 589

    1ton
    Member

    When is the last time anybody changed out the old brake fluid for new. As we all know, brake fluid attracts moisture. It's the moisture suspended in the brake fluid that causes the breakdown of components in the system. When I buy a used car, the first thing I do is check, fill or replace all fluids in the vehicle. As far as brakes go, I inspect the system for any needed repairs, fix if needed, then loosen up the bleeders and change the old fluid for new. This way I know exactly where I stand with maintenance for the vehicle. If I were going to store a vehicle for awhile, I would make sure that it is not sitting there with 10 year old brake fluid. Change it out for new and you will not have any problems when it comes time to get it out and drive.
     
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  7. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,258

    squirrel
    Member

    That's a great idea....but we still don't know how old the rubber parts are, and how long he plans to store the car. "long term" could mean a month, or 20 years, or anything in between.
     
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  8. 1ton
    Joined: Dec 3, 2010
    Posts: 589

    1ton
    Member

    The rubber parts will certainly let you know when they are ready to be changed. Please pardon me for stepping on anyones toes, but in my opinion, draining the system is the worst thing you could do. By doing that you are allowing the rubber components to dry out. That combined with possible condensation, which may occur, would allow corrosion within the system. This goes along with my opinion that it is better to store your car with a full tank of gas rather than partially full or even empty. Fill the tank, run gas out of the carb.
     
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  9. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,258

    squirrel
    Member

    I suggested replacing all the rubber parts, then leaving the system dry, and refilling before driving the car. Just trying to drain a brake system is not going to work very well, is it? There's no drain plug.

    Also, I would rather completely empty the fuel system for storage, than leave it full. Fuel will evaporate from the carb, leaving some residue there and in the fuel line. Condensation will form in the tank. Gasoline (especially today's gasoline) is rather volatile, and eager to absorb moisture, no matter how much is in the tank. Having a non-vented gas cap will help.

    Of course, the best thing to do depends on the length of storage, storage conditions, condition of the car, etc.
     
  10. 1ton
    Joined: Dec 3, 2010
    Posts: 589

    1ton
    Member

    Hey Squirrel. what you said about the length of time that the car will be stored has a lot of meaning to it. The longer the storage may call for more drastic measures. If just being put up for the winter is another thing. Makes me wonder what an auto museum does to cars that will sit for years. Either way, I'm a big advocate of having fresh brake fluid in my lines. Old cars are a lot like women, keep them well oiled and lubed and they will , most likely, be ready to go for a ride whenever you are.
     
  11. hammer-time
    Joined: Oct 31, 2012
    Posts: 30

    hammer-time
    Member

    Well said...words to live by...;)
     
  12. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,258

    squirrel
    Member

    Changing brake fluid is something most of us never get around to like we should....and it's gotta help, if done regularly.
     

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