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Technical Stainless trim mig welded...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by ebfabman, Jul 17, 2014.

  1. Nads
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 11,628

    Nads
    Member
    from Hypocrisy

  2. Nads
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 11,628

    Nads
    Member
    from Hypocrisy

    Take a look at the thread above, hope it helps.
     
  3. 1934coupe
    Joined: Feb 22, 2007
    Posts: 4,074

    1934coupe
    Member

    You guys are good! This should be a piece of cake then:rolleyes:. Seriously where there is a will there is a way. That's "hot rodding"

    Pat
     

    Attached Files:

  4. M224SPEED
    Joined: May 12, 2010
    Posts: 171

    M224SPEED
    Member
    from Missouri

    Nice job, too bad that when someone posts good Tech Info. on here there ALWAYS has to be a few clowns to start a small riot...... Now I will get a ton of flack for speaking my say in this !
     
    48stude likes this.
  5. ebfabman
    Joined: Mar 10, 2009
    Posts: 651

    ebfabman

    I don't worry about what people say. Just believe in what you think is possible and keep trying.


    I have three mig welders. The one I used on the stainless trim is a Lincoln that was given to the teams when I was hanging bodies for a few cup teams. Its a 230 volt unit with a four position setting on the power. I used the lowest setting on the power and about 60% on the speed.
    I used a .020 302/304 stainless filler so it won't take much heat but you won't need a lot on thin trim. If you are getting a bump on the under side then you are getting good penetration.
    Grinding and polishing is no big deal, just be careful and go easy.
    There is no doubt tig welding for most people would be easier to control especially on thin stuff, but its by no means the only way. I'm sure a good mig job would be virtually impossible to distinguish from an equally good tig job when both are finished.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2014
  6. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,258

    The37Kid
    Member

    I've read all the posts and replies, a good welder can MIG stainless if they are happy with the finished look.. But for a perfect stainless weld TIG is the way to go, I can't understand why you would go 80% on a job if you had the time, skill, and TIG welder, but that is me. Bob
     
  7. ebfabman
    Joined: Mar 10, 2009
    Posts: 651

    ebfabman



    A perfect stainless weld is a perfect stainless weld. Mig or tig. No way to tell the difference by looking at the finished product.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2016
  8. flthd31
    Joined: Aug 5, 2007
    Posts: 561

    flthd31
    Member

    I agree. Those headers I posted earlier in this thread have quite a bit of MIG weld in them along with the TIG welds and not a single pinhole...and they're high polished to a mirror finish. Can't tell the difference.
     
  9. williebill
    Joined: Mar 1, 2004
    Posts: 2,594

    williebill
    Member

    Looks great to me, thanks for posting.
     
  10. I really wonder where this misinformation comes from.
     
  11. Just a question.
    When you weld stainless do you need stainless files and wire brushes? Do you need to pickle or passivate?
     
  12. ebfabman
    Joined: Mar 10, 2009
    Posts: 651

    ebfabman

    I used stainless wire brushes
     
  13. I've never understood why an interesting thread like this has to be turned in to some sort of shit storm by some people. Ebfabman I've been aware of your welding skills for many years through another board. Mig seems to be your weld style of choice, and you have it down for sure! Nice job!
     
  14. joeycarpunk
    Joined: Jun 21, 2004
    Posts: 4,443

    joeycarpunk
    Member
    from MN,USA

    I don't have a TIG so this is of some interest to me. Its unfortunate when someone pees in the pool sort of speak with this method is better, faster, etc. I could take it to someone and pay to have my stainless done but that kind of goes against my intent and pocket book . Thanks for posting this.
     
  15. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,258

    The37Kid
    Member

    For me it is based on seeing bad MIG welds vs good TIG welds. Bob
     
  16. Thanks for hanging in and answering the OP's question(s)! Your skills are phenomenal! I'd be interested in seeing a how-to video...do you also torch (oxy-fuel) weld (I'm trying to learn).
     
  17. Somebody wants to show me a video of that trim being stick welded, I'd be realy impressed then. :eek:
    -Pat
     
  18. joeycarpunk
    Joined: Jun 21, 2004
    Posts: 4,443

    joeycarpunk
    Member
    from MN,USA

    A craftsman doesn't blame his tools. Granted the right tools can make a job easier. Yet I've seen many impressive things done with very meager means. Better or easier to work with often determined by how much you need to do and when. Again thanks for posting.
     
  19. Stefan T
    Joined: Sep 15, 2008
    Posts: 2,166

    Stefan T
    Member
    from Sweden

    One tips accoring mig welding smal things is to put copper behind the welding place
    works good on stainless and "farmers steel" and on aluminum
    on aluminum it works even well with stainless steel

    Thats importanet to get rid of all blue or discororation if you need full rust stablisation
    and should use same grinding tools that have been used to normal steel
    thats even good to pickel the welds so it will passivated

    But this is normaly not necsarry to cars or motorcycles
    This for pharmaceptical use
     
  20. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 6,512

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    I've welded a couple A grill shells for a friend with tig....Color match and grinding/buffing of the welds was good....chasing all the stress cracks and keeping from making a bigger mess was not, damn shell was thinner than I thought it should have been made!! recently I made a 304 SS grill for my shoebox, I used wisdom [yeah, amazed me too!] and used .060 wall tube so I could bend and grind to my hearts content and not bend it buffing...I used mig to tack pieces [since my mig welding experience is short I only tacked but with the .023 SS wire it probably would have been great with some practice] when in place and removed and finished with tig...I'd love to see a video...Maybe a tall tale but a guy at work whose father was a Welder said that he [his father] could put a .010 bead of weld on the edge of a razor blade .
     
  21. randy
    Joined: Nov 15, 2003
    Posts: 677

    randy
    Member

    Looks good. My thoughts? Every time I've welded SS trim I've used a TIG and drop pieces of the same trim as filler rod. The idea behind this is that you're using the exact same material as filler so it will be invisible once polished.

    I've welded & polished plenty of stainless for non-car projects and I can always find the weld joint when using off the shelf filler rod. Usually it's just a slight tint darker or lighter than the base metal, but I've never had a perfect match. It's obvious that MIG welding SS trim is possible but I'd bet you could find a ghost of the joint in the finished product.

    Thoughts?
     
  22. got a youtube link for us?
     
  23. ebfabman
    Joined: Mar 10, 2009
    Posts: 651

    ebfabman

    55 dude, while the welding parts will apply to on topic hot rods, the vehicles in the videos are slightly off topic by a few years so maybe its not so appropriate to link them on this site. Just do a search, they are easy to find.
     
  24. ebfabman
    Joined: Mar 10, 2009
    Posts: 651

    ebfabman

    Thanks
     
  25. 50dodge4x4
    Joined: Aug 7, 2004
    Posts: 3,535

    50dodge4x4
    Member

    Up until this 2nd post, after I asked the questions, all this thread was, was a "look what I can do" thread. Thank you for the information.

    Looks like all I have to do now is wait for a cup team to give me a 230V, 4 welding position setting, Lincoln welder, so I can set it on the lowest power position. Then all I need to do is buy (unless you care to donate some to me, since I don't buy anything I might need) some .020 302/304 Stainless filler wire (which my local welding supply doesn't carry), and I will be all set. Good thing no one has ever helped you before.
    Thanks for the info. Gene
     
  26. ebfabman
    Joined: Mar 10, 2009
    Posts: 651

    ebfabman


    I already had 2 mig welders when I got the Lincoln, the others work equally as well. The lincolns were only given to a few of us. Easy to figure out who they decided who to give them to.
    Any help I EVER got I either paid for or exchanged work for. I had no mommy daddy to ask for anything or help when I needed something. Had to use whatever resources were available. Now you have the WWW at your finger tips and a wealth of information. The techniques and methods I use are what I developed by spending a lot of time trying different ways to get the results I was after.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2014
  27. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,744

    stealthcruiser
    Member

    302/304 stainless wire you can find, I'm looking at a roll right now, of .025 dia.
    Also has on the label other "boxes" to denote the size, 2 of which are .020 and .021 dia.

    It's known in the aircraft bidness' as "safety wire", and this particular brand is from the "Malin Company", of Brookpark , Ohio.

    Their website shows as :
    www.malinco.com

    There's your filler wire, now get busy practicin', 50dodge4X4 !...... ; )
     

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