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Spring behind axle w/ wisbones-how do you do it?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by sedan_dad, Oct 13, 2003.

  1. OK, my spring showed today! It was nice quality for $75. I will post some pics soon, I am getting close to having this thing rolling
     
  2. Does Mr. Roadster have a site?
     
  3. yngrodder
    Joined: Dec 1, 2002
    Posts: 1,506

    yngrodder
    Member

    Im doing one right know and Im keeping track of all the parts you need and pictures for a tech. The 40 wishbone is the strongest one. and dont use a bolt to hold the spring perch. spend a little money and buy adjustable spring perches and cut them shorter and rethread it to make the threads longer. leave a shoulder on them and then take the wishbone cut a bigger hole in it. and then weld a sleeve in it so the pearch will rotate with the axle when it moves up and down that way you can move the axle farther out and the sping dont bind. As far as the adjustable spring pearches those are handy so you dont have to worry about drilling the hole in your wishbone at an angle. This will be a lot easier to understand when I get the pictures Posted and a full teck on it. any questions please Pm me. <font color="red"> </font> This way is a safe way to do it and the strongest that ive seen.
     
  4. [ QUOTE ]
    so the pearch will rotate with the axle when it moves up and down

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Adjustable perches are not suposed to rotate.
    That's why they do not have any type of bearings.
    Metal on metal will wear.
     
  5. J Man
    Joined: Dec 11, 2003
    Posts: 4,128

    J Man
    Member
    from Angola, IN

    I looked for a Mr Roadster site a couple weeks ago and could not find anything. I think the may be exclusive to Speedway.

    I was told that if using more than a 4" drop axle that ou run into problems with the axle twisting. The same person said that if you use 36" radius rods rather than the 27" it corrects the problem. Anyone else know about this. I was planing on using a 6" or 7" drop axle with the spring behind setup.
     
  6. When stock axles were dropped,the ends got thinner.
    The larger the drop,the thinner the ends of the axle.
    I think 4" was a practical limit for the material they had to work with.
    Anything more,and the axle wasn't strong enough because it got too thin.

    A custom made axle can have as much material as you want,where you need it.
    So 5",6",7" isn't a problem that way.

    Scrub line might be a problem. [​IMG]
     
  7. Toqwik
    Joined: Feb 1, 2003
    Posts: 1,308

    Toqwik
    Member

    how bout this ???
     
  8. Toqwik
    Joined: Feb 1, 2003
    Posts: 1,308

    Toqwik
    Member

  9. yngrodder
    Joined: Dec 1, 2002
    Posts: 1,506

    yngrodder
    Member

    Before you order a droped axle you might want to do a mock up. because when you move the axle out front and up your already dropping it. Yes the pearch rotates with the movement of the car. as you move the spring behind the axle and the axle goes up and down with the pearch mounted in one place you are puting the spring in a bind. and that results in problems after a while. (Broken spring bolt Or Broke springs) it would take a while for this to happen but if you drive a car like it they are meant to be then you might as well do it right the first time. NONSUICIDE FRONT END The farther you move the spring back the more it will bind
     
  10. Toqwik
    Joined: Feb 1, 2003
    Posts: 1,308

    Toqwik
    Member

    I emailed you the pic I was trying to post, hope it comes out. Seems to me alot safer way to mount the spring behind than drilling thru the wishbones, will distribute the weight/load more evenly, hope it helps...Scott
     
  11. thirtytwo
    Joined: Dec 19, 2003
    Posts: 2,640

    thirtytwo
    Member

    mr roadster is speedway's own little line of stuff , i cant see how differnt drops would affect twisting that much i think that person was refering to i-beam verses tube axle, i beam twists tube doesnt... at least not enough to even notice, that was the reason for four bar.. blah blah blah , anyway on a hotrod the suspension doesnt work much more than 3'' at the most the only time this becomes an issue is on driveway inclines if you have a ridgid chassis a front wheel will lift of the ground cause things arn't allowed to twist if this bothers you go with four bar or an i-beam, how ever alot of people use this setup and put up with it its on fairly steep inclines, i would rethink the 7'' drop however i built a 29 pickup with this setup and a stock 48 axle - 2" drop and its LOW... 7" would probely make it drag on the ground id use 36-48 bones too they are the heavyest ive seen it done on earlier ones and its dangerous , remember the weight of your car is now on the bone and not on top of the axle, eventhough the car is light the impact of hitting a pot-hole at 80mph is pretty severe make sure to over build it so you never have to second guess it , its not called a suicide axle for no reason
     
  12. thirtytwo
    Joined: Dec 19, 2003
    Posts: 2,640

    thirtytwo
    Member

    thiss is how i did mine i used the bungs that were cut off the 40 bones and gusseted it alot, not as trick as alot of ones ive seen but tons more stury than lots of others, and nothing to buy either
     

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  13. thirtytwo
    Joined: Dec 19, 2003
    Posts: 2,640

    thirtytwo
    Member

    otherside
     

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  14. 3bytheknee
    Joined: Nov 1, 2003
    Posts: 307

    3bytheknee
    Member
    from Sonora, CA

    First, a comment on Jimmy Shine's rod. I admire the clean construction shown in the various photos, no matter who built it or if it has been on a trailer. Nice work!

    The photo posted by Unkl Ian shows the small clevises on the single blade (probably 3/8") batwings. An option is to use the double sided batwings such as those sold by Speedway. These use the larger diameter bolts, 1/2", running in steel sleeves and nylon bushings connected to the bat wings. These would be substantially stronger. Using hairpins or 4-bars will give a space to run steering rods. Springs, shocks, or coil-overs can be mounted to gussets on the hairpins. Like several others, I am in the imagineering process and gathering parts and ideas. I've committed and bought the 4" drop axle and the double sided stainless bat wings. I am leaning toward coil-overs connected to the hairpins but have not bought them yet. The object is to keep just the big smile of a tube axle out in front with as little clutter as possible. Thanks to all the contributors on this suicide axle thread. [​IMG]

    3bytheknee
     
  15. nlualum82
    Joined: Dec 24, 2005
    Posts: 103

    nlualum82
    Member
    from Oregon

    I’ve been thinking on something like this myself. My 2350 lb. ‘36 Chevy pickup rides on an ‘82 Toyota chassis.
    I have 2 issues with the front end:
    The wheels need to mounted 4” further forward just to line up the tires with the front of the grill. Further would be cooler.
    The stock steering box is big and ugly and sits beside the grill shell.
    The Toyota chassis has torsion bars and I wanted to retain them.
    I want to link the existing arms at the end of the torsion to the wishbones. This will require some use of ball joints or something to allow for a little misalignment through the motion.
    Until I saw this thread I was a little squeamish about drilling through the wishbones and my idea was to weld a “fin” along the underside, for much of the length of the wishbone and drill my hole in that.
    Sound workable?
     

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