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Technical Split "gripper" Screwdriver

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by jaw22w, Apr 12, 2021.

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  1. jaw22w
    Joined: Mar 2, 2013
    Posts: 1,259

    jaw22w
    Member
    from Indiana

    I used to have in my screwdriver collection a flat screwdriver where the flat was split up quite a ways up, and there was a sliding collar that when pushed down spread that split tip, and it gripped the screw. I hope that made sense. It has been a long time since I have seen it and can't find it. Never saw one before or since. I don't know where it came from or where it went, but it sure would be handy right now. Is this a common thing?
    I am working on tuning a carb and changing air bleeds. The primarys bleeds are tough in front of the choke. I have been putting blue tape on the screw driver tip until the jet sticks in the slot, but that is a pain in the ass, and it scares me working on top inside of the carb. I can just see a jet down in the manifold!
    I don't know what it is called or I would google it. Any one know where to get one?
     
    scotty t likes this.
  2. greybeard360
    Joined: Feb 28, 2008
    Posts: 1,748

    greybeard360
    Member

  3. Dirty Dug
    Joined: Jan 11, 2003
    Posts: 3,678

    Dirty Dug
    Member

    I have one too. Also a couple of Proto tools that do the same thing , screw starters. Don't know how I'd install points without one.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2021
    Sporty45 likes this.
  4. dalesnyder
    Joined: Feb 6, 2008
    Posts: 457

    dalesnyder
    Member

    They are called screw starter screwdrivers.
     

  5. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,655

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I had one, very handy. (#2 blade size, just right) Last time I saw it, my younger brother was looking at it, probably stoned, laughing..."Why would you keep a busted screwdriver in your screwdriver drawer??? Ah, hah, hah..."
    I explained its use to the nimrod, showed him how it gripped the screw, then placing it back in its niche'.
    Next day or two, I went to the drawer and...Where? Didn't use it...gone.
    Where indeed.
     
  6. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 5,739

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I have one of these. It must have been abused in the past because it never worked very well.
     
  7. GeezersP15
    Joined: Dec 4, 2011
    Posts: 555

    GeezersP15
    Member
    from N.E. PA

    I'm retired now, but at my job prior to retirement, we had a plethora of these things. We referred to them as "Screw Shooters" because frequently, the screw you were trying to secure had a tendency to eject from them. Do a search for "Holding Screwdriver", and I think you'll find what you are searching for.
     
    Ford52PU likes this.
  8. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,655

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ha! Just found another one! Klein tools, on Amazon! $ 8.95 for a single 1/4", $29.00 for a set of 3, graduated sizes... Woo hoo!
     
  9. fabricator john
    Joined: Mar 18, 2010
    Posts: 166

    fabricator john
    Member
    from venice fl.

    favorite screwdriver trick a older race engine builder showed me in the 80s . dip the screwdriver tip in a lil valve grinding compound strait or especially phillips makes em grip like crazy , allways kept some in my tool box since then ...
    fabricator john
    miss you dad
     
  10. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 2,648

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    The best ones I own are kinda spring loaded , twist set the screw and release the twist and it’s good to start any screw . I hold you are not working on a carb that is installed on the engine . What you are doing spells disaster fast . Murphy will move in on you when you lease expect him to .
     
    Murphy32 and VANDENPLAS like this.
  11. Glenn Thoreson
    Joined: Aug 13, 2010
    Posts: 211

    Glenn Thoreson
    Member
    from SW Wyoming

    I know exactly what you're describing. I used to have one, too. Lost it and most of my tools in a burglary in the early '60s. I wish I had it back. I had another neat screw driver/starter that was just a knurled shaft about 5/16" diameter by 3" long with a blade on one end.. In the center of the blade was a separate little portion that you turned at the top to line it up with the rest of the blade, put your screw on there and let go of the top and it would grip the screw tightly. Absolutely perfect for working on distributors with their crotchety little screws that hold the points and especially the condenser. I hope that thief enjoys my tools. I had a lot of neat little gadgets. Maybe you could could use a piece of thin tubing that would slide over the blades while held together with needle nose pliers. It would be a bit too big but you could put a crimp in it so it would slide down to close the blades. (?)
    Keep an eye on ebay (motors - tools). A lot of stuff shows up there.
     
  12. Those are known as 'holding' or 'starting' screwdrivers and are commonly used by electricians. Not useful for tightening, but very handy for starting screws in places you can't get your hand. Most any electrical supply house should have some.
     
  13. Here is a bunch of them I bought at an estate sale awhile back.The nylon ones are great for working on electronics where getting zapped could be a problem. Some of them are stamped,"Blue Point" BluePointScrewHoldingDrivers 001.jpg BluePointScrewHoldingDrivers 002.jpg BluePointScrewHoldingDrivers 003.jpg BluePointScrewHoldingDrivers 004.jpg
     
  14. I've got a couple of this type also. The problem with these is they don't work as well on worn or 'less precise' screws. Generally work best on flat or pan head screws like in terminal strips or points screws, not so much on other types.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2021
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  15. jaw22w
    Joined: Mar 2, 2013
    Posts: 1,259

    jaw22w
    Member
    from Indiana

    Thanks for the name. I just ordered a set of Kleins. 3/16, 1/4, and 5/16 Be here in 2 days.
     
    Atwater Mike likes this.
  16. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,655

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ah, 'Blue Point', the China mfg. arm of Snap On.
    Did you know... 'Blue Point' was the original tool company Snap-On bought way back?
    Now they're 'back seat status'... Covid tools.
     
    warhorseracing likes this.
  17. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 29,612

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I had one in my tool box for years. It seems that when you pushed the collar down the split blades slid over each other and were supposed to wedge themselves in the screwdriver slot.

    I have one or two of the spring loaded ones that Safarinut showed in post 13 that I use a lot. Probably more now that my fingers don't work so well.
     
  18. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 2,648

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    The grinding compound , works well with a stripped out screw head , never expected it to hold the screw . Usually lots of new potty words and the drill are the final answer for me
     
    stillrunners likes this.
  19. RidgeRunner
    Joined: Feb 9, 2007
    Posts: 906

    RidgeRunner
    Member
    from Western MA

    Got one, also a similar one with 4 points for small Phillips head screws. Stashed where I wouldn't loose 'em (or can remember where they are), don't recall if they had a name on 'em or not. Impulse buy at a farm supply store when I spotted them on sale on a counter display. Been real handy at odd times over the 50 years or so when I can remember where I can find 'em.

    Ed
     
  20. carbking
    Joined: Dec 20, 2008
    Posts: 3,092

    carbking
    Member

    I still have the set of 6 Craftsman that I bought from Sears some 50 years ago. The problem with the Craftsman set is none of them were sufficiently small for carburetor throttle plate screws.

    I finally found the small size produced by Vaco. These come in a number of lengths

    In addition to the split blade with the sliding collar; someone else produced a holding screwdriver with the center of the blade rotating to wedge against the slot. After the second screw went flying while the "holding" screwdriver was still on the bench, the holding screwdriver went flying into the round file!

    There are also magnetic holding screwdrivers. 60 years ago, before I knew about such factory tools (and it would have made no difference if I did know as I would have been unable to afford them), we used to magnetize normal screwdrivers. They would lose magnetism after a few weeks, and we would just re-magnetize them.

    Useful tools!

    Jon.
     
  21. corncobcoupe
    Joined: May 26, 2001
    Posts: 5,581

    corncobcoupe
    SUPER MODERATOR
    Staff Member

    This really belongs in the Garage Journal site.
     
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