Register now to get rid of these ads!

Hot Rods Soldering electrical connections 101

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by blazedogs, Dec 19, 2021.

  1. One more trick to keep out water is to use heat shrink a size larger than needed, then fill a throw-away syringe with handle dip and shoot some into the heat shrink at the terminal or joint before heating it. Eliminates any moisture or air. The extra step is too tedious for every joint, but exactly the thing for headlights, taillights or anywhere that water and high amps do their dirty work. Learned this trick after repeatedly having issues with my Massey Ferguson.
     
  2. Dedsoto
    Joined: Jan 7, 2014
    Posts: 188

    Dedsoto
    Member
    from Australia
    1. Aussie HAMBers

    Reformed solderer here, mainly due to my brother providing me with all my auto electrical supplies, and it's always hot here!

    @Harv 42 (107F) forecast here for Christmas!
     
  3. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 40,112

    loudbang
    Member

    I don't know about now but when in was in the USMC MILITARY soldered connections sure were used in F-4 b Jet planes. Spent may a day all crunched up in the back seat of them soldering pins of cannon plug connections for the radios and Encryption boxes. :rolleyes: I would hazard a guess that they still use solder on those pins.
     
  4. I found a good one at Advance Auto Parts for around $32, it is adjustable and handles common crimp terminals. I have a few simpler ones that do the Packard style terminals. Lowes has a nice stripper for under $30 I use all the time.
     
    nochop and Boneyard51 like this.
  5. Ebbsspeed
    Joined: Nov 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,774

    Ebbsspeed
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I spent my first few "productive" years installing telephone central offices, in the mid 1970's and must have worn out a dozen of those darned wire wrap guns. My right forearm was 25% larger than my left. I could squeeze the sap out of a tree limb with that hand, and hurt one of my cousin's hands giving him a firm handshake.

    The company finally bought electric wrap tools and the exercise program ended.
     
    loudbang and Boneyard51 like this.
  6. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 4,516

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    some presses we use--old overhead line presses and a new stacon tool my friend just bought. Another handy item is self vulcanizing tape--To bring a wire out of a loom midway or seal ends of loom. Non-conductive as well.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 21, 2021
    loudbang and bobss396 like this.
  7. woodiewagon46
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 2,003

    woodiewagon46
    Member
    from New York

    All one needs to do is to Google, "should I crimp or solder electric terminals" and the answers are very clear that crimping is the way to go.
     
  8. '34 Terraplane
    Joined: Jul 11, 2011
    Posts: 277

    '34 Terraplane
    Member
    from Western PA

    Truckdoctor Andy, loudbang and blowby like this.
  9. 2OLD2FAST
    Joined: Feb 3, 2010
    Posts: 3,993

    2OLD2FAST
    Member
    from illinois

    Just for discussion , I have had my boat for 48 years , the wiring with connections I soldered taped with friction tape covered with vinyl tape are still fine. I'd opine the vibration & moisture is worse in a marine environment .
     
    Boneyard51, loudbang and 57 Fargo like this.
  10. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 8,302

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    loudbang likes this.
  11. If the terminals are tin-plated, they should hold up well. Just about anything I have used has been tin dipped.
     
    Boneyard51 and loudbang like this.
  12. '34 Terraplane
    Joined: Jul 11, 2011
    Posts: 277

    '34 Terraplane
    Member
    from Western PA

    I use it whenever I can even with the 14ga. 14 ga. is the smallest die.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  13. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 2,484

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    Is there a chart or something that tells you the physical size of different guage electric wires. What I mean is, there are a kazillion charts that tell you what "size" (guage) wire you need for a project...........but I have a lot of wire I have picked up over the years that is on spools or in a roll, and it has no identification as to what guage it actually is. Especially when you get down to the smaller wires, its hard to tell what you have. I thought about making a little board with the different size wires mounted to use for a quick reference. Anybody know of a way to tell what guage a wire is if there are no markings on it ?o_O
     
    loudbang likes this.
  14. G-son
    Joined: Dec 19, 2012
    Posts: 933

    G-son
    Member
    from Sweden

    If the wires weren't rated by a system invented by a drunk penguin you could just measure the diameter of one individual strand, calculate the area, multiply the area by the total number of strands, and know the total area as other countries rate their wires. I suppose you could still use that method, along with a AWG vs. area conversion chart.

    Knowing the resistance of copper and the length of a wire i suppose you could measure the low resistance through a piece of wire and calculate the approximate area. Would require 4 wire measuring.
     
    Fogger, ekimneirbo and loudbang like this.
  15. woodiewagon46
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 2,003

    woodiewagon46
    Member
    from New York

    Yes, you need to locate what is called an American Wire Gauge Chart. It lists all the measurements you want.
     
  16. There are multiple charts giving conductor diameter for a given size but they all have caveats of one sort or another. The diameters given for AWG sizes are all for single-strand solid wire, with a note that 'stranded will be slightly larger'. There is also a 'British Wire Gauge' (BWG) and metric sizes, neither of which will quite align with AWG. Note that none of the charts include the insulation as that can vary widely. Any UL-rated wire is required to have the size marked on the insulation (and I'm sure that's true for the 'other' standards as well), although in the smaller sizes you'll need a magnifying glass to read it.

    I simply use my strippers to determine wire size if there's a question. Generally, the smallest hole that will cleanly strip the wire without cutting any strands will be the AWG size. Make sure your strippers are in good condition.
     
  17. The jacket size and strand count will differ on military wire, as well as domestic. So you can get a general idea of what gauge it is by the outer jacket on most commercial products. I tell by just looking at it most of the time.
     
    Boneyard51, ekimneirbo and loudbang like this.
  18. 2OLD2FAST
    Joined: Feb 3, 2010
    Posts: 3,993

    2OLD2FAST
    Member
    from illinois

  19. Luckily, those are now available with crimp and insert type contacts.

    That's not really a reliable way of determining wire gauge given the variety of commonly available insulations on wire - GPT, GXL, SXL, TXL, etc. One needs to strip the insulation and look at the conductor.
     
    Boneyard51 and loudbang like this.
  20. bobkatrods
    Joined: Sep 22, 2008
    Posts: 703

    bobkatrods
    Member
    from aledo tx

    Yes, fact I worked commercial aviation for 35 years,no soldered joints allowed
     
    Cosmo49 likes this.
  21. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 8,302

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

  22. 2OLD2FAST
    Joined: Feb 3, 2010
    Posts: 3,993

    2OLD2FAST
    Member
    from illinois

     

    Attached Files:

    blowby likes this.
  23. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 8,302

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Hey that's neat. Great, another horse in the race..
     
  24. Well, as someone who has used both types professionally, I'll go hydraulic every time. The mechanical ones work fine but can be gut-busters on the larger sizes and the one pictured has rather short handles which will make it worse.

    Do a 'net search before buying. The hydraulic one pictured is all over the 'net, with common prices $20 less (including shipping) than HF. There's also heavier 16T units that if you're primarily interested in battery cables will be a better choice for a few bucks more. Pay attention to the die shape; some have round dies, the hex-shaped dies are better.

    Considering that the name-brand pro hydraulic units cost 20X what these do, these are steals...
     
  25. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 4,516

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    ^^^ this--I have the old overhead line press type. Used them for years-still do but as said it can be tough to press larger conductors. Work well-just got to put the handles together!!
     
    loudbang likes this.
  26. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 8,302

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Thanks. For a hobbyist doing maybe a half dozen crimps a year I could handle the extra effort of the mechanical ones, but can you get 10 tons out of one? Would be nice not to have to think about hydraulic fluid problems, especially with the 50 buck ones.
     
    Boneyard51 likes this.
  27. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 4,516

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    the overhead line presses are for overhead conductors wiih heavy load and tension as well-used them for many years-if used properly-no failure-just gotta put the handles together!! I have a high dollar Burndy overhead hydraulic press as well with various dies-have not used it in many years.
     
    Boneyard51 likes this.
  28. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 8,302

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Which ones are the overhead presses? The bolt cutter type?
     
  29. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 4,516

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    yep-see them in post#96
     
    blowby likes this.
  30. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 5,573

    Boneyard51
    Member

    I have no faith it those crimper that have the dies! Several times I have had battery cable made at truck shops and they had those die type crimper. Big ones! I watched the man select the right die for the cable and the right terminal. I watched him do the crimp…all the way! When he handed me the cable, I pulled on it and it came out of the terminal! He was pissed ! Told me I ruined the battery cable! This has happened to me more than once!
    So , I quit those type crimpers. Period!
    I use the crimper pictured below! All crimpers I use have the deforming indent on them! Big and small! And no hydraulic, for me! I don’t do that many and don’t want to deal with foreign junk leaking fluid on my shit!
    47B1B661-19E0-4433-B3FE-4A657C00C7F0.jpeg FD02EBA0-6830-481E-B4D0-3820D83C3604.jpeg 8D1605DA-7652-4405-824A-A87517A2001A.jpeg
    But that is just me. Too old to change my ways!






    Bones
     
    olscrounger likes this.

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.