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Technical Slight "ticking" in 9" ford decelerating

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by da34guy, Oct 18, 2020.

  1. Just swapped out rear pumpkin in my 9" rear.
    It drove great with out problems for about 50 miles,
    Yesterday took it out for about a 100 miles trip and noticed a slight ticking upon decelerating after about 35 miles.
    I did have to change the yoke to mate to drive shaft.
    Maybe not enuf torque on the pinion nut ?
    Any suggestions to check.
    Thanx in advance for any suggestions.
     
  2. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,874

    squirrel
    Member

    loose lug nuts? :) I only say that, because I've done it

    Get under there and see if anything is moving around. Turn it by hand and listen. Good luck
     
  3. harpo1313
    Joined: Jan 4, 2008
    Posts: 1,969

    harpo1313
    Member
    from wareham,ma

    Listen to the u joints and keep your hand on it so maybe feel the tic.
     
    da34guy likes this.
  4. wicarnut
    Joined: Oct 29, 2009
    Posts: 4,246

    wicarnut
    Member

    Check u joint, they can make a ticking noise, usually noise on deceleration is related to a pinion problem from my experiences.
     
    da34guy likes this.

  5. 1st thing I checked Jim, goin under 2 day to check U joint and pinion nut.(maybe re torque it)
     
  6. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 10,315

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    When you check it you need to have the transmission in neutral so there is no load on the drivetrain.
     
    da34guy likes this.
  7. I had a low speed driveline ticking tha drove me crazy trying to hunt down. I finally found it inside the driveshaft. It seems when it was made a couple "spark marbles" made their way into the shaft while being welded. Likely not your problem, just sharing.
     
  8. Hate to suggest it, but when you swapped pumpkins, did you remember to fill it with gear oil... It was a painful, expensive lesson for me as a much younger fella.
     
    mgtstumpy and squirrel like this.
  9. jaracer
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 502

    jaracer
    Member

    Everyone has given good suggestions. Back in the 70's I worked at a Lincoln/Mercury dealership and Ford had problems with their castings; they were soft. The spider gear housing would wear egg shaped at the axle gears. This would make a ticking noise when decelerating. It was most noticeable at low speeds, like coming up slowly to a stop sign. We did quite a few for this problem. We also did quite a few cylinder heads for worn valve guides at very low mileage.
     
  10. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,874

    squirrel
    Member

    I did that 30 years ago..it was a hell of a lot worse than just a ticking sound on deceleration!
     
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  11. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 13,786

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    That kind of reminds me of what my high school pal did in the early 70's. I had a 57 BelAir and he had a 210 wagon, both 283/4 speeds, his a somewhat healthier dual four 283.
    About a month after I blew up the 3.08's in my car and put 4.11's in it he called to ask where I found my replacement third member, apparently he bought the last one that our local wrecking yard had.
    He had blown up his ring and pinion and in his zeal to get it put back together he failed to get all the broken gear pieces out of the bottom of the housing and on his first test drive he blew the rearend again when the gear grease picked up a broken piece and ran it through the ring and pinion, that was an expensive lesson.
     
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  12. I may be crazy but I ain't stoopid fauj
     
    fauj likes this.
  13. I had the same symptoms with a chipped ring gear.
     
  14. When you replaced the yoke. Did you check the pinion rotational torque? If not right, the pinion bearings might be too loose or tight.

    Sent from dumb operator on a smart phone
     
  15. Bangingoldtin
    Joined: Sep 9, 2020
    Posts: 73

    Bangingoldtin
    Member
    from Virginia

    Assuming the pumpkin assembly ran quiet before the swap, and all that was done was replace the pinion yoke, I suspect it needs to be re-torqued. I believe the torque required is 100 ft lbs. to re-tension the crush washer.
     
  16. Doin that this am Banginoldtin. all research tells me 250 lbs.
     
  17. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 10,315

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    With a crush sleeve style pinion bearing preload system if reusing the crush sleeve there is no torque spec. If you try to go to a torque spec of ? there is a chance you can crush the sleeve more and that will create more pinion bearing preload that will smoke your pinion bearings. Best way is to get a new pinion nut and tighten as tight as you can without crushing the sleeve anymore. If that makes sense.
     
  18. jaracer
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 502

    jaracer
    Member

    Actually, the best way is to replace the crush sleeve every time you service the pinion bearings or replace a seal. It normally takes over 150 ft lb to get the sleeve to begin to crush. From there you are going by the turning torque on the bearings. It's a 9 in so removing the pinion assembly isn't a big deal.

    When I taught differential overhaul, we would "un-crush" the sleeve on our lab units. That way we could use them over and over. I wouldn't recommend doing that on anything that's going on the road.
     
    saltflats likes this.

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